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New Phonebook Article


Clay Edgin

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http://www.nmstrongman.com/advancedphonebooks.html

This article shows two alternative techniques that you can use to tear a phonebook in half other than the popping technique. I'd encourage anyone interested in learning how to rip a book to learn all the different methods of ripping and not just use the popping technique. Your hands will be much stronger for it.

Linked fixed.

Edited by ClayEdgin
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Link not working....

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Added to the favorites!

Thanks for that Clay-great information! :bow

-Rick

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Thanks, Clay.

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Thankyou Clay its always nice to have detailed tips passed on by those at the top of there game mucho apprecio eh gringo :D

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Great article Clay, I immediately started trining on the new techniques :)

Strangely I seem to have more trouble with the sideways method than the Grip n' Rip.

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After ripping through a few Boston area phonebooks I thought I had it down, but now I've gotta learn the grip 'n' rip and sideways methods. Those are more impressive, anyway, since all the pages start basically at once. Luckily Verizon just delivered a forklift pallet of them to my office!! Thanks!

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http://www.nmstrongman.com/advancedphonebooks.html

This article shows two alternative techniques that you can use to tear a phonebook in half other than the popping technique. I'd encourage anyone interested in learning how to rip a book to learn all the different methods of ripping and not just use the popping technique. Your hands will be much stronger for it.

Linked fixed.

That's awesome, thanks Clay!

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Question: I'm working on the SW method now. I've gotten like 50 pages on to tear on the front & back of the book and see stretch marks on the middle pages connecting those partial tears. Is it important to have a clean edge, or should I keep working on the slightly mauled part? If I keep moving to crisp areas of the book, I might soon have a book that's a little mangled everywhere but not torn in half.

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Question 2: Is it a more traditional rip to go top to bottom (binding on one side) or side to side (ripping towards the binding)? I think the grain of the paper runs top to bottom, resulting in a cleaner and potentially easier tear. I've been ripping towards the binding, and I've found that so far I get a good, but ugly looking, rip, and right before the binding the tear usually takes a 90 degree turn, and doesn't rip straight thru. Not sure if this is unavoidable or if I need to grip even harder to force it straight, but I always assumed the classic way to tear was towards the binding. Not sure if that was a question or a statement.

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Question 2: Is it a more traditional rip to go top to bottom (binding on one side) or side to side (ripping towards the binding)? I think the grain of the paper runs top to bottom, resulting in a cleaner and potentially easier tear. I've been ripping towards the binding, and I've found that so far I get a good, but ugly looking, rip, and right before the binding the tear usually takes a 90 degree turn, and doesn't rip straight thru. Not sure if this is unavoidable or if I need to grip even harder to force it straight, but I always assumed the classic way to tear was towards the binding. Not sure if that was a question or a statement.

You get a neater tear if you tear with the grain of the paper. You can test tear one page of the book vertically and horizontally (in a spot your big tear won't go through, if you're concerned about making it one page easier). Usually, one of those ways, the tear will want to turn 90 degrees. In my experience, most books have the grain running vertically.

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More smoke and mirrors huh....I'd expect nothing less from a leather wrapping, nail folding, deep-setting cheater like yourself :D Good stuff Clay.

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Great article!!! Thanks, Clay.

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At work today i the break room they had a bunch of old pamphlets that were about 3/8" thick and built like a phone book so I gave tearin a try. Got up to 5 books thick (about 2") with the POP, 3 books thick with the grip n rip, and only 2 with the akward for me side tear. Super fun and really satisfying to rip. Hearing and feeling the big tear is more fullfilling I think than ripping decks of cards. And I got super pumped after the 2" thick tear.

Thanks Clay!

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Awesome, thanks for the info.

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Nice, thanks Clay!

Does anyone know if the 'Grip & Rip' technique is the one Dennis Rogers uses? I was under the impression that he used no technique at all, just kinda tore it.

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