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More Reps On Gripper Does Not Mean More Strength.


kelby

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i have been working out for years, this one time a friend benched 225 25 times. i could only do 20, but when it come to power i was benching way more then him. i was doing 380 at the time. he did it way less. is ti the same with grippers. i always here people say i can do 20 reps on number two, but still can't close the number threes. i don't know, but correct me if i am wrong. doesn't that have to do with endurance. and it doesn't mean you are more powerful then someone who can close it ten to fifteen times.

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If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

But will being able to do more reps on a #2 gripper enable you to close a #3?

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i had seen guys do way more reps on the bench press than i. or squats etc, but yet they can not bench worth crap. and i think it is the same for grippers. after five reps i think it becomes an endurance factor and not power.

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Generally speaking, no. There comes a point of diminishing returns (which I guess is a sliding scale and depends on the individual) as the body is trained to get better at what you do.

If you do high reps you get better at doing just that.

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i had seen guys do way more reps on the bench press than i. or squats etc, but yet they can not bench worth crap. and i think it is the same for grippers. after five reps i think it becomes an endurance factor and not power.

i agree with you, for bench i never do high reps. for that matter i never go for high reps on any lift.

but i guess it depends on your goals too, some guys may wanna get strong while others are trying to ''bodybuild''

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If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

If you close a gripper for 50 reps, and the next workout 55 reps, did you get stronger, i.e. would it be easier for you to close the next gripper up (to not get into the semantics of what "strength" constitutes, I use strength here as denoting absolute/max strength) ?

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My mate can rep his store bought gripper all day long but yet can just about close the Trainer. I think it is more of an endurance thing once you get past a certain amount of reps.

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But that is not the issue. I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

Yes or no?

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But that is not the issue. I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

define strength.

technically endurance is a form of strength which would make the answer yes.

but I personally don't give a shit about grip endurance which makes the answer either no, or very, very little, depending on the individual. Some people can actually get stronger from medium reps. I respond best (max strengthwise) from 1 rep or less(negatives, attempts, cheating)

Edited by ulgrim
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Although I have to say, training up to the 6-8 rep range help me build consitency with whatever weight I'm using and I would call that strength. So 10-13 might build strength for somebody.

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But that is not the issue. I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

Yes or no?

yes

if you did 1 rep with the #1 one day but the next day you got 2 reps have you doubled your strength?

i think when you improve in reps under 10 it will help alot as far as strength goes for the next gripper, but if you get 55 reps compared to 52 reps the time before and then try and close the harder gripper up you will fail. its a % thing

im not trying to sound smart caus im not :whacked

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"But that is not the issue. I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?"

For grippers no, if thats all the variables you give. What if the person were doing those 10 reps no set , then learn a better technique "set" and thus got 3 more reps, now did the person get stronger or just smarter? Not to be picky but when it comes to grip strength its not the same as say leg strength. For example in the area of the hand you have multiple joints therefore the muscle to ligament/tendon ratio is closer to equal then say the area of the quads. But if you say all things stay exactly the same i.e. technique, gripper, and previous other body training (either none or the same) and a person increases from 10-13 then yes he/she is stronger.

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But that is not the issue. I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

Yes or no?

Well you obviously see this as a semantic argument, which I believe is not the original intent of this thread.

In my perception, when people use the term "strength" they usually mean absolute strength, i.e. the maximum amount of muscular force you can apply to any given excersize/task.

From that standpoint, the answer to your question can be answered by a yes, but can also be anwered with a no.

Yes, you do gain some strength, since the rep range is still applicable to absolute strength. However, the diminishing returns would start at about 3-8 reps, until you reach a point where more reps would reap no strength, but only more endurance.

No, you would not gain significant strength compared with a rep range of 1-3 reps.

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I should have prefaced my statement with "all other things being equal," technique improvements not withstanding.

So now we have in fact established that "reps" can in fact make you stronger (defining strength as an increase in the ability of human musculature to produce more force over a given amount of time), at least in so far as the understanding and interpretation of everyone who has answered.

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But that is not the issue.  I will say again :If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

Yes or no?

Well you obviously see this as a semantic argument, which I believe is not the original intent of this thread.

In my perception, when people use the term "strength" they usually mean absolute strength, i.e. the maximum amount of muscular force you can apply to any given excersize/task.

From that standpoint, the answer to your question can be answered by a yes, but can also be anwered with a no.

Yes, you do gain some strength, since the rep range is still applicable to absolute strength. However, the diminishing returns would start at about 3-8 reps, until you reach a point where more reps would reap no strength, but only more endurance.

No, you would not gain significant strength compared with a rep range of 1-3 reps.

well said

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I should have prefaced my statement with "all other things being equal," technique improvements not withstanding.

So now we have in fact established that "reps" can in fact make you stronger, at least in so far as the understanding and interpretation of everyone who has answered.

If by "reps" you mean repetitions in the ~ 3-15 range, then yes.

That's not in my opinion a good definition of "reps" however, since "reps" do not imply a certain number.

EDIT: But in that context, I guess the name of this thread is poorly formed, as it maybe should read: "more reps than X does not mean more strength". I got the general idea, though ;)

Edited by nagual
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If you close a gripper for 10 reps in one workout and 13 the next time you train, did you get stronger?

So who is stronger, Individual A who can do 13 reps on the #2 but can't close a BBSM ( assuming average #2 and average BBSM) or Individual B who can do 10 reps on the #2 but can close the BBSM?

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So who is stronger, Individual A who can do 13 reps on the #2 but can't close a BBSM ( assuming average #2 and average BBSM) or Individual B who can do 10 reps on the #2 but can close the BBSM?

I know the answer, but I'd rather not say because I don't want to offend the weaker individual. But I will say that Individual C can kick both of their butts.

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However, the diminishing returns would start at about 3-8 reps, until you reach a point where more reps would reap no strength, but only more endurance.

No, you would not gain significant strength compared with a rep range of 1-3 reps.

So you're saying that you can't get any stronger unless you do 3 reps or less?
So who is stronger, Individual A who can do 13 reps on the #2 but can't close a BBSM ( assuming average #2 and average BBSM) or Individual B who can do 10 reps on the #2 but can close the BBSM?

Assuming we are gauging strength by the amount of reps performed then obviously Mr. A. If you are gauging by hardest gripper closed then B. Without defining how it is you are measuring strength, there is no meaningful way to compare the performance of two individuals.

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