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    Mike Rinderle

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    Chez

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    Joseph Sullivan

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  4. Kluv#0

    Kluv#0

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/24/2018 in all areas

  1. 14 points
    One of my main goals for 2018 was to qualify and compete in NAGS so I was very excited for the opportunity to check that off my list this weekend. Training had been going well and I was confident in a strong performance. Rob and I were the only competitors registered for the 105 class. Since we train together I had a pretty good idea of my odds. I thought I could edge him in grippers and wrist roller but would lose substantially in the other three. With percentage scoring my only chance would be if Rob washed out on an event. My morning started with a very punctual 4 am pickup from Rob with Nick already in the car (he traveled an additional 1hr from London first). We then picked up Gus at a car park 30mins later. By 6 we had crossed the border with no issues. We made one stop for gas stateside and arrived at the venue sometime after 830. Jedd, Luke, Nigel and Adam Culver (who was working all day to make things run smoothly, thanks Adam!) were busy getting everything setup. We spent some time visiting (others arrived during this time) and checking out all the events. Once we could officially weigh in at 9, our car left to grab some breakfast at a nearby greasy spoon. Rob and I both made weight easily. When we returned everyone was there and the contest started on time at 11. Grippers: I had warmed up jumping every 10 from 80 to 140 and took my opener at 145. It was a miss. Frustrated I decided to drop back to 140 to get myself on the board. I took my third attempt at 145 and missed again. I could feel my set needed to be just right if I was going to get this, and I managed to finally get it on my fourth attempt. I was hoping to do better here but it was enough to edge Rob who closed the 140. I know this gripper set had surprised some people last year and several people underperformed this year as well. However some managed great numbers and while I do agree that different makes of grippers feel different, and gripper ratings vary, I think the only thing going on is the added element of performing in a contest. Euro: This was my first time touching a euro. I had done all my training on a 2" climber pinch and decided to pinch at 52mm. I don't remember the exact numbers here. I opened around 180 successfully and then made a 10lb jump and missed it 3 times. A few thoughts here, the Euro has a very sharp corner relative to my climber pinch. As a consequence every lift I made warming up and attempts pulled a little skin in my thumb webbing. I managed to not tear but I only made about 10 lifts with it. I would not want to train with such a device. Also, the way the weights are loaded on either side makes it awkward to fit between your legs. I can only imagine, even more so for the shorter competitors. Otherwise, I like the Euro. It was well seasoned with great texture and changing widths while time-consuming ran very smoothly. I think an adjustable pinch device like the one @Adam Juncker built is the best option I've seen. Oh and I think Rob lifted like 30lbs more than me. Napalms Nightmare: Also my first time touching this implement. We had trained for this by fixing two rolling thunders together. Thick bar events are my weakest and I knew this is where Rob would smash me with the percentage based scoring. The NN felt easier than our double RT setup and I opened with an easy 280. During this time I was having a discussion with Tom Bryson about strongman training and lost track of what was going on a bit because suddenly it was up to 305. I asked Jedd if I was SOL or if we could drop back down to take an attempt at 290. He kindly agreed and I made it. I put it back to 305 for my third attempt and it ripped right out of my left hand. Usually, once I miss in thick bar its game over but I took a minute and to my surprise, I managed to get within an inch of the crossbar before I returned it to the floor. If I had been paying attention and was a bit more conservative in my jumps with longer rests I think I could have taken 300. Lesson learned. It would not make any difference as the contest was filled with thick bar monsters. Rob finished with 350 after taking an ambitious final jump to 370. Eric, Justin, and Tom didn't start to warm up until it hit 350. I believe Justin opened at 400+... The Medley: Medleys are always my favorite part of a contest and I was very excited to take a run at this one. A short medley like this requires the right strategy for success. Given that the lowest item in a category was worth 2 points it was obvious that the most important thing, was to do something in every category rather than waste time trying to upgrade a feat for one extra point. My plan was to start at one end and work my way through scoring points at each station and then circle back if I had time to reattempt. I had even printed off the medley list, hightlighted the weights I thought I would attempt and left it on my toolbox at work a week prior to prepare myself to stick to the plan. There were a few adjustments I made after trying some items when we first arrived. I was very happy with my medley run. I stuck to my plan and when I met a feat I could not get I quickly downgraded and moved on. With time left on the clock I made a second attempt a the 2 35s pinch and got some air but not enough. I ended with 41 points. Rob had a great medley run and scored 51. There was no chance now. The Wrist Roller: I may have been one of the few people looking forward to this event. I expected this to be a good event for me but had no idea if I would lose steam half way down. Prior to my attempt only Nick had finished the distance with a time of 57s. I gave it my best effort trying to utilize longer strokes over faster shorter ones (these grip jokes just write themselves) and finished with 56s. My lead was not to last however as Chez, Justin, and eventually Luke left me in the dust. Rob had another great showing here and I only beat him by 1 second. In the end, I placed second to Rob in 105 and 9/18 overall. I'm pleased that I cracked the top 50% and overall with my performance. Congratulations to @Rob McMurren who not only smashed me but finished 4th overall. Though we were competitors we are training partners first and I was happy to see him do so well. Plus he was my ride home 😛 Congratulations to @Lucasraymond on his overall victory! Thank you to Jedd, Luke, and all the sponsors, and volunteers who helped run this event and all the competitors who made the trip! After the contest, I jumped on the arm wrestling table with anyone I could. With so many talented arm wrestlers there it was a great opportunity I didn't want to miss. We helped clean up a bit and hit the road at 630. We made one stop for gas and had planned to stop for food but Rob was a man possessed and got us all home in great time. I was wrecked the next day. My kids did not let me sleep in.
  2. 12 points
    Played with my new toy today. Should have done the 2" first. May have gotten 400. @Lucasraymond and @Jedd Johnson have a killer product here. 500 X 5 on 1" handles - actually 1.25" 395 lbs on 2" handles Need a longer loading pin or skinnier plates. 😂
  3. 12 points
    Well to start I definitely did not think that I was going to win at the start of the day with Eric Roussin and fellow Canadians including Justin Major and Tom Bryson I was hoping to sneak into the top 3 overall. To start the day I woke up at 4:15am super anxious for the contest which is normal if anyone knows me. My weight was somewhere near 205 but wasn’t too concerned whether i would be in the 93k or 105k class so i ate a small bowl of oatmeal and drank a creatine drink. I had a bunch of stuff I needed to load in my truck and planned on being at the gym early to help Jedd setup what he didn’t have done. After the 50 minute drive there it was 7:45 and only Jedd and Nigel were there. This was my first time meeting Nigel but following him on IG and FB I feel like I already knew him. After messing around with the two different scales we realized they were both about 1 lb over after checking them with the calibrated plates so we were both good for our respected weight classes. After getting everything settled in an people slowly coming in I relaized there must be something in the water in Canada that makes the people grow bigger because their smallest guy was over 6’ tall and the lightest Dan Fleming is a grip monster. Chez had put together a list of the USA team for each event and after going through it, the lineup was set and knowing it was going to take some serious lifts to surpass the team from up north. Event 1- Grippers- I hadn’t been able to train heavy grippers R handed due to injurying my R middle finger when chalking the hub in the Armlifting Contest in Philly (yeah quite the way to injure your finger); so I was unsure how I would do and I was hoping I could get 1-2 decent closes RH on the first two attempts and then if I had to go LH. First attempt I decided to go fairly high with a 155 and smashed it closed, immediate sharp pain in my finger but dissipated enough for me to try 160; close but no cigar. Next attempt I took LH and wasnt close and final attempt RH again no close. Finger held up enough to get me where I was hoping to end up. Event 2- Euro Pinch - Last contest I was training and consistently pulling 227+ training but wasn’t able to reproduce those numbers in contest. This event I didnt even train Euro specifically instead training flask and IM blockbuster so I was unsure where I was going end up especially since tearing on my last flask session. Warming up I felt pretty good and was able to a few singles at 216 lbs on the warmup implement but is much more seasoned. After hitting my first two attempts at 203 and 208, Rob and I decided to jump up to 218 and both of us unsuccessful. Event 3- 60mm Napalms Nightmare- thickbar has always been where I lag behind compared to the other elite 93k people and this was no different. I started light at 323 and took my next three attempts at 333, 338, and 348 all successful. The three thickbar giants from Canada still hadn’t even started; Eric, Justin, and Tom. I wasn’t paying full attention but I believe Tom finished around 380-390 and the Eric and Justin at 412. Justin was frustrated as he had pulled 430+ in training which is just unreal strength for both guys. I knew at this point I was close to the top 3, after figuring out the scoring I was indeed 3rd place behind Justin and Eric and felt I had a possibility of moving up based on the medley and wrist roller event. Event 4- Medley - based on the items and the weights I was hoping to coming in at 53-56/60 but trying to determine the order to which I could maximize the points without fatiguing and failing on items I would normally lift is that planning part of the medley that makes it challenging. Knowing fatigued I wouldn’t be able to lift the 160lb crusher or the fatman blob those were the first two items I did. I was able to get everything I wanted except the 50lb inverted DB which I ended up with 55/60 which was the winning score wit the next highest being 51/60. After this event Eric and I were tied for first and Justin close behind. Event 5- Wrist Roller- Ive had success with wrost roller events in the past and Jedd and I tried to figure out an appropriate weight that would lead to about a 40% success rate for the competitors and came up with 115lbs added to the sled. So 130lbs, 34’ and 60 secs was the course. As contestants went through the first competitor to finish was Nick Carigan (Canada) and then 3-4 more competitors coming in around 51-54 secs. Then in third place Justin Major sets a blazing fast pace with 39 secs with Eric and I still to go. In my head I now have to see how Eric does but also have to be able to stay within a few seconds of Justin to win the overall. Eric came up 2ft short of finishing and now I had to pick up my game as this was mine to win. No one else to help and all on me, I win or lose it’s all me. Prior to my attempt my anxiety was kicking in, heart rate was elevated, a little shortness of breath; so after chalking up I decided I would set a timer on my phone for 75 secs and when it said 60 I would start. As I am going I am focusing my eyes on the rope as it is winding on the wrist roller and nothing else, I could hear people yelling including Adam with the time but couldn’t decipher the words and the first time I looked up the sled was about 6’ from the line and I kept cranking on it until it crossed the line and looked at my phone which said 25 sec remaining so I had finished it in 35 secs and then In the excitement and couple yells I realized I had won my first overall contest and just happened to be NAGS. Jedd had informed me that Brad Martin the gym owner had donated a prize for the overall winner and to find out it was a genuine replica of the 1988 Winged Eagle WWF Championship belt was truly badass. It was a pleasure not only being in one of the closest grip contests but also competing with a bunch of new people that I had only ever seen on social media including; Nigel, Vinnie, Tom B (who made the trip from western Canada), Justin M, Nick C, and Bernie. Not to mention everyone that I had previously met an competed with. I look forward to many years to come and hopefully team USA can bring the team championship back!
  4. 12 points
    Jedd Johnson, Eric Roussin, and everyone who helped them deserve the gratitude of the 18 contestants and the spectators for hosting and producing a professional and successful event. Thanks, guys and gals! This was just my second comp, as I am new to grip sports, having started training in November at the young age of 48 1/2. I am now a slightly more seasoned 49, so next year, at least as long as the Nationals are held after my April 27 birthday, I will be able to compete directly against fellow 50+ Master Mike Rinderle. Oh wait -- guess I would be better off staying in my weight class, because Mike will never drop to 83kg. Oh wait, Dan Fleming. I already asked him to put on a few pounds and he was a little cagey with me about that, so I guess all I can do is lose 20 pounds to hit the 74kg class, and hope Nigel "the kid" Blackburn does NOT gain weight and meet me there. Those are three names of three super competitive, grip strong, good guys whom I had seen only in text on the grip board until yesterday. Pleasure to meet you! You are not the only three inspirations I met there, but you and the rest fit into this macho/geek hybrid sport where everyone is welcome as long as they like to squeeze and crush shit. Or even just to watch us do that. Then there is mighty Joe Sullivan, who came so close to winning his weight class even without knowing how to set a gripper. Joe, I, too, have a problem with sets. Chez has persuaded me to give it a go and see if I can up my numbers with some set practice. I agree with you that there is something satisfying about TNS closing a gripper than some strong dudes can't close no matter what they do. But, there are some strong dudes who can close monster bigger grippers than we can, and one of them insists that setting is part of that success. I'm gonna give it a go. I was also happy to see that I was far from the oldest competitor (I was the oldest at my first comp in February). Here, we had Mike, Bernie, and Gus in the masters group all over 50, and I hope they go again next year when I am also a master, so I can ... well, not be the oldest yet again. So my thoughts on the events: Grippers - I closed 135, then 140, then failed twice on 145. I've closed up to 149 rated grippers, but I never practice block set, and it cuts me down a bit. I was actually satisfied with the 140, as I got only 138 at my last comp. I would like to see a TNS or NS gripper event some time, maybe in a medley (e.g., have a COC 1.5 be the 2 point choice, then 2 is 3, 2.5 is 4, and 3 is 5, and you have to TNS it for the points). Joe, I know you're with me on this one. Euro - I pulled 172, 182 (plus or minus 1 or 2 because I think Jedd was actually aware of small variations in the plate weights and was calculating more precisely than adding the numbers on the plates). I missed on 188, twice, although I floated it. My PR is 193 and I've floated 200, but since every Euro is a little different, I am pretty happy with getting that close to my PR the first time I ever did Euro in competition. I think Jedd managed to run this very smoothly, and I heard others saying it could have taken twice as long. Napalm's Nightmare - here I was nervous because of the weirdness of trying to hit the cross bar. I don't know if I could have done it without standing on the plates, and I know the stance issue really screwed over Chris, which sucked. I got lucky that the single plate got me high enough, because the two looked awkward. So because I was nervous about the stance, I was a bit too conservative, and I pulled 235, 250, 260, 270. I had a little left and was considering trying 300 just to see, but I figured that would just tire me out for the next events. I should have started higher and done a more ambitious fourth attempt; my PR is 280 and I think there was a chance i could have done more. I'm not sure what to say about the stance issue. Other than that, I like that implement and would not mind seeing it contested again, but maybe the set up should be analyzed. Maybe just lockout should be enough? The big guys will still win. Medley - FUN! I had never done one before. I did 2 pull ups (didn't think I could do any after that morning since I suck at pull ups even fresh) for 3 points, the smallest blob for 2, the 25 plate hub lift for 2, the two 25s pinch for 3, the sledge choke for 3, the face lever for 2, the anvil for 4 (could have gotten 5 on that, tried after, I should have known because I am good for my size on anvil and the big guys were saying it was way too easy), the key pinch for 4, the dumbbell lift for 3, the full dumbbell blob for 3, rolling handle for 3 (32 total) -- like Big Joe, I completely forgot the 5 10s pinch! I can do 4 easily, so too bad I left that out for another 4, but playing it cool and doing it right is also part of learning how to compete, so I will do better next time. Wrist Roller - ok, could not finish that, and ripped up my thumb not doing so. Mike has this one pegged right. Hate. But, I do need to do more wrist work. I borrowed Anton's 8 pound sledge to get myself a little better in that arena. So I think I finished 14 out of 18 or so, and I might well have finished ahead of everyone lighter than me and behind everyone heavier than me -- which I guess means I am doing fine! Guys, thanks for being enthusiastic representatives of a sport and hobby that is healthy and fun; the positive vibes all around grip stuff are part of what makes it such an enticing pastime. I'm in! - I'm also Vin
  5. 12 points
    I learned a few things and notes on yesterday: - Wish I knew the Canadian team was made up of extremely massive beasts before I talked so much smack. 😂 Congrats to team Canada on a well deserved win. Great bunch of guys! - I need to train grippers. Skin between the handles, bad sets, poor choices on what grippers to try, and just not being very strong on them yesterday almost had me bomb out. Ended up dropping down to 135 on my final attempt, just to make sure I would get a close and some points. 34 lbs below my best 20mm block contest close. Oh well. Some days you have it, some days you don't. - A full week of rest before a contest is way too much for me. Going back to 3 days. - Luke Raymond is a Beast! Congrats on a huge win. - Eric and Justin pushed him right to the last event. Great job! - Didn't get my 200lb 2HP, but I did get 194 and change on a very humid day when everyone's numbers were down. Was very happy with that. - That was the best run contest I've ever competed in. Jedd did an amazing job. 2HP flew by instead of taking 3 hours. - Thanks to all the sponsors. Very much appreciated - Dan Fleming is a mutant. So strong for his size. Was a blast to watch him compete - Big Joe Sullivan did an awesome job. Without a mental error on his part in the medley (and if he'd learn to set a gripper), he would have taken me in the 120kg class. He accidentally skipped the 5 dimes pinch in the medly, but got it afterward. Dude's a beast. Always fun to compete with him. Once he's done a few more of these, I think he'll be competing for the overall. - Congrats to everyone who competed. Meeting everyone was the highlight of the day. - They should replace waterboarding with the wrist roller event. - Thanks to my beautiful wife. Without her there, I wouldn't have been able to snap back mentally from the disastrous gripper performance. - Most fun I've had in a long time with my clothes on. - After the medly, I got some air on the Fatman. It will be lifted this year! Oh Canada...
  6. 10 points
    No hook grip- 20 lbs over my BWT done after 20 sets of Greshamgripper rows, Pendlay rows and seal rows. 1 lb over my PR done at Autism fundraiser last year:) Goal 275 at BWT 220
  7. 10 points
    I guess today was NAGS Championship write-up day! I’ll add mine to the lot. This was my fifth NAGS Championship and one of my favourites. As I got closer to Elmira I felt a bit like I was heading into the middle of nowhere, but when I arrived I found the venue itself to be perfect for the contest. The separate room for the wrist roller and medley was cool. I think what I was most excited about was the fact that, for the first time, Canada had a decent-sized team at this contest. I think the previous participation record was 2 (maybe 3) Canadians. This time, we were eight! This truly helped make the event seem like the “North American Championship”. And with the last minute decision to add a Canada/USA team competition, I felt good about our odds! Action got underway exactly on schedule – which is great. I can tell you that this is not the norm for armwrestling tournaments. In the gripper event, I hoped to close at least the 155, but came up a bit short. I nailed 150. I was satisfied, but far from thrilled. I’ve had a lot of skin tears over the past few months. My hands were healed, but I was wary of the Euro. Sure enough, my skin started to tear on my first attempt. I was successful on my second attempt (203 lbs) but did more damage to my hands. Given that the 203 was difficult, I weighed the likelihood of success at 208 against the likelihood of further skin damage, and I decided to forego my third and fourth attempts. After two events, I was trailing Luke just slightly, but I knew my money event was coming up. Napalm’s Nightmare. Training had been going very well on this implement. I had lifted 410 in training, and felt I had room for more. On my third attempt I successfully lifted 412. I wanted to see if I could get the nice round number of 425 on my final attempt, but it was not to be. My strategy for the medley was to be very conservative. For instance, instead of lifting 5 10s, I went with 4 10s because I didn’t want to risk losing valuable seconds if I attempted 5 10s and they all came apart. The result is that I may have left a few points on the table, but not much. I earned 49 points to Luke’s 55. After four events, Luke and I were tied to the hundredth of a point. This was bad news for me, because I have a bad track record with wrist rollers and he’s amazing with them. I didn’t quite get the sled all the way to the end, but I think I got it furthest among those who didn’t complete the full length. Of course I wish I would have done better, but I was satisfied. By the end of the contest, Team Canada had 45 points and Team USA had 60. With reverse strongman scoring, this meant we had won! I’m already looking forward to next year’s contest. A special thanks to Jedd, Luke, and everyone else who helped make this contest a success.
  8. 9 points
    Thought I’d share a performance from last week. I was asked to perform as an oldtime strongman in an circus themed opening act at a theatre in Stockholm. Instead of the stereotypical mustached trongman in leotards, I figured I’d deliver a more modern take on it and go for a tattooed shirtless strongman. Which I think worked out pretty well. I did a few things at the show, acrobatics and lifting people. But I also included a steel bend where I bent a 12 mm x 1 m HRS over my head. Which is a super easy bar to bend, but the next size up would have been a 14 mm bar. And that would’ve been a bit too risky considering I had to bend it over my head with no wraps or padding while making it look easy. So I went with the safe bet of 12 mm. The first pic is just me posing like a douche during the opening act. But if you swipe you can see the bar I bent during my solo act.
  9. 9 points
    I went to NAGS this year with no expectations. Training had been going well until a skin tear, a work trip and a cold got in the way. My main goal was to not zero on anything and see Gus have a successful day . Grippers suck, or I suck at grippers. I never spend enough time on them and it usually hurts me in comps. I opened at 135, made it and went for 145, not even close. Dropped to 140 and missed it twice. I had been closing in the 146-149 range 2 weeks earlier but just didn't have it. 2 hand pinch was a PR for me. I pulled 208 to tie Lucas in the event. It felt really good , so Lucas and I both went to 218 and both missed. Napalms Nightmare. I had no prior experience with this apparatus, but I really like it. I opened at 315, took my next lift at 348 or 352, can't remember. I then jumped to 370. I took the big jump because I only had 2 attempts left and Eric, Tom and Justin hadn't gone yet. If I was going to push them I would have to make some big jumps. 370 wouldn't move. I finished 4th or 5th. Medley's are my favorite and this one had a lot of implements which suit me. I went into the medley in 9th overall and came second to Lucas. I did have a couple of firsts, my first time front levering a 10 lb sledge and I lifted a fatman blob (not during the medley though) Wrist roller. We had a wrist roller at NAGS in 2014 and sucked at it then. Not an event I really look forward to. Having done Josh's Instagram contest this year helped. I finished in 57 seconds, which I was happy with. In the end I won the 105s over Andrew. and placed fourth overall, which I was extremely happy with, given my shitty start with grippers. It was good to see Gus Bush do well. He set a couple PRs, (I think he was top 5 on the napalm) After we finished the Napalm he says, "its nice to beat the young guys once in a while"
  10. 9 points
    I wanted to do a good physical challenge that was bending related for my 40th birthday today. I came up with 40 red nails for my 40th. I did it in 59 minutes and 28 seconds. The bending itself is not bad and I could probably go on for a lot longer but the pain started getting a little intense when the skin was ripping off my index and middle fingers of both hands and the palm of my left hand. The skin started failing at about 20. I have not been doing much volume on DO, mainly a couple max type bends. Hands were not used to this volume. A fun challenge and I am very happy with it. I used moderate sized single leathers. Not much difference in size than IMP but a lot easier with wrapping, etc with the volume. Here are a few photos from the fun:
  11. 9 points
    Found this on my phone after cutting the grass while pulling my sled. Apparently my wife thinks I'm an idiot. She's correct. Sled grass cutting As for what will the neighbors think... Exactly what I want them to think: Stay away from the crazy man's yard!
  12. 9 points
    For years I kept my Medley a secret - but then because I was competing - people starting saying I had an unfair advantage. Hell at my age I'll take every advantage I can find - and not feel bad about it either
  13. 8 points
    I'll start off with a little background before the competition: I come from a strength training background. I was a competitive powerlifter who also messed around with a few strongman events. Powerlifting inevitably became a "chore." I didn't look forward to training, which is always my favorite part of the day. I started brainstorming and realized that grip, to me, is the most fun thing to train. When I get into a hobby, I REALLY get into a hobby. I contacted @Jedd Johnson about getting serious about grip, and we started working together. In January, we started discussing possible opportunities to compete; we both agreed that NAGS 2018 was the way to go. I weighed about 158 at the time, so I hit the qualifying numbers for the 74kg class, but I knew 66kg was attainable (my previous powerlifting weight class). I was given the green light, so I booked a hotel and got my flight from Florida to Elmira. Fast forward a few months: After a full day of traveling, I made it to Elmira. My meals consisted on protein bars, unsalted cashews, and a small amount of water. I have always had a lot of anxiety about weight class sports. Making weight is something that scares me. After a poor night of sleep, it was game day. Jedd picked me up and drove me to the gym a few hours early. I had about 3 hours until comp time, and I was damn near ready to get it going. I made weight--not by much. It was a figurative sigh of relief. Weight was taken care of (66kg); now I could shift my focus to the competition. I had the pleasure of meeting and talking to all the competitors, which was great! Everyone was friendly and supportive--surely a nice change of pace from the near-toxic level of competition I have experienced in other sports. Time was flying; before long, it was go time! The first event was a 20-mm block set close. This event worried me because I had discovered very close to the competition that the block I had been using was closer to 19mm. I ended up packing a Jenga block of all things. I was a tidbit wider than 20mm, but I was set on using my own block so I could place it in my teeth for a super quick transition into the block set. Once it was announced that the lightest weight class starts it off, a fire was lit; that meant I was the first person to take an attempt. Immediately my nervousness transitioned into laser-sharp focus. A deep breath, and I was off. I started off with a BB rated at 130. The set felt spongy and easy, I quickly transitioned and slid the block through, and crushed the first attempt. I was off to a hot start and confidence was high. My goal was to close a gripper rated at my bodyweight, so my sights were set on the 145. My confidence got the best of me for my next attempt. I took a big jump and missed the 140. No worries. My third attempt, I got the 135, but not very convincingly. I ended up fumbling around with the block set and had trouble opening it wide enough. The fourth and last attempt crept up on me, and I retried the 140; close but no cigar. I was admittedly a little discouraged as I closed much heavier in training, but it seemed like everyone had a rough gripper day, so I couldn't be too mad. Regardless, the 135 gave me a WR by a wide margin, shattering the previous 115 in my weight class (although it was not contested many times). The 2HP was next. I had my number in mind: 172. 172 would break the recently set WR. I was really thrown for a loop here, as I ended up unintentionally halting the competition as I was trying to find out exactly what I needed. I felt like I was inconveniencing everyone and felt a little embarrassed as a result. After hitting 160 convincingly, I attempted 173, which was the closest it could get to 172. I broke 173 off the floor, but I couldn't lock it out. Not only would this be a WR but also a 10-lbs PR. I was visibly frustrated, but I tried it again. This time, no budge. Hindsight bias really got into my head here. I knew I could've gotten 170 and posted a better number, but I got greedy. The Napalm Nightmare followed shortly after. My goal was the hit around 260. I knew this would likely be my worst event, and I was right. I hit my opener at 235, and it went downhill from there. Despite hitting 238x4 in training, I couldn't get 245 on my next 3 attempts. I was actually just happy I didn't bomb out on this event. The medley room was a sensory overload--12 objects in 90 seconds. I never got to practice medley because I ended up resting about a week and a half before the meet to mend up a few aches and skin tears. Once the timer started, I moved quick and efficiently. I had a plan, and I executed very well. I made two huge mistakes, one of which I did not even notice until after: I forgot the anvil completely and did not lift the crusher. The clip on the Crusher got stuck on the loading pin, so I skipped it and came back at the end. By that time I was gassed and failed to lift it. Rookie mistakes, undeniably. Last event: the dreaded wrist roller. I can't write much about this. It was honestly a blur, and I'm 100% convinced I have already repressed the memory. All I can tell you is made it about 26 feet and my forearms nearly exploded. So, yeah.... that's all I have to say about that. Initially, I was very disappointed in my performance. I took gold and set a modest WR, but my main goals remained unachieved. I then gave it some though. This was my first ever grip competition--WHO CARES. It was that simple. I'm 23 years old, and I just finished my first competition. My main goal was to get my feet wet and experience what gripsport is all about; I did just that. I also got the meet the community--every single person I met was kind, encouraging, and well-spoken. I had competed and had a blast doing it. With that being said, I would consider NAGS 2018 is be a great success and a day I won't forget. I'm already looking forward to all my future competitions where I will get to meet more people and run back into the great people I have met. I would list everyone out, but I feel this post is already way too long as is.
  14. 8 points
    I remember this and want to share it with few people. Brian Shaw competed in Grip before his first WSM competition in 2007 or 2008. He always had strong grip. The earliest mention on him here that I remember was by Clay Edgin and David Horne (David just documenting grip events). We see here in 2005 Iron Will Grip contest, California, U.S.A. that Brian Shaw got the second only after Clay himself. And was the best pincher on that day too. He was documented in David Horne thread too. Clay Edgin in his topic Freak Alert here on the gripboard (he also spoke about him back in Grippermania if anyone remembers it) that he is 6'8", 315 lean muscle, and 9" hands. In Clay's word "Yesterday at my strongman and grip comps, there was a guy from Colorado named Brian Shaw. Brian is the real deal. 6'8", 315 lean pounds. Deadlifted the Inch right and left EASILY multiple times upon request. 9" hands. He closed my #3, missed a hard Elite by 1/16", two hand pinched 200 with lots of gas in the tank, one hand pinched 95lbs without chalk or warmup, pulled 180 on the equalizer handle (2.5" steel, spins on ball bearings), narrowly missed 200 on the same handle, and is just one of those guys who is freaky strong all around. He also ran with 300lbs per hand on 2" farmers walk handles for 100ft in 14 seconds." He said his strength comes (he thinks) from grippers and strongman training which made his pinch and thick bar super crazy too. We also see Wade here talking about Brian Shaw ( https://www.gripboard.com/index.php?/topic/22475-impressive-im-news/&page=2&tab=comments#comment-284572 ) and says is on par with him (when Brian wasn't as strong as he is now. Now is MUCH stronger) along with Sevajian Vache. Guess what? He became WSM many times when the top people where competing (Unlike Mariusz pudzianowski who didn't have the tops like Zydrunas Savickas except once) and lifted the biggest blob with ease. He also liften the 98KG inch so easily. Certainly our grip training helped him to reach WSM level 😛JK people.
  15. 7 points
    Hello All, Nathan made my Millennium replica - now owned by Bader - it weighs 106kgs/234lbs, so is heavier than a standard Millennium. Nathan also made me an exact replica of Apollons Wheels, made to specifications (extensive) provided by Dr Randall Strossen. It is these wheels that proved to be very difficult to make, and yes, many where made before they got them to the exact weight. I know that Rob Blair has a Millennium copy at the Commando Temple in London - it was purchased from its previous owner on the quite untrue claim that it had belonged to me - I think the confusion lay in the fact that Nathan made other copies using the mould he used to make my 'original' copy. It also weighs 106kgs. These are the Apollons Wheels that Nathan made for me - 166kgs/366lbs. Laine
  16. 6 points
    ...the bend is lacking the flow, as I haven't bent long bars the last few weeks, but I am happy nevertheless! Let's see what's next... 🙂
  17. 6 points
    OSH"18 final results. Fun day, cold at start 53 but ended up low 60's- Very tired but helped a lot of new people and had wonderful shared experience. Thanks to my man special K and Adam Juncker for donating prizes:) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7i4yvgyUug OSH 18 Final Results.xlsx
  18. 5 points
    Yes, that actually would seem fair. And I am certain of two things: 1) I am better at grip than at least 99 % of people my weight, of any age; and 2) someone from the other 1 % will be at Nationals, if not every meet I attend. It's all good. I have been in this for maybe 6 months now and have not had so much fun, felt so strong, and met such good people in YEARS if not DECADES. Looking forward to Saturday!
  19. 5 points
    Hello, It doesn't look like a Millennium to me...I think that name is reserved for the real thing, which is a very different beast to pick up.
  20. 5 points
    I may just drink all day and make you drive me home We should do grippers on skates, give everyone a chance against you
  21. 4 points
    http://www.ironmind.com/news/IronMinds-Man-of-Pen-and-Stone-Steve-Jeck-19642018/ I saw this on the Ironmind site yesterday, and was very saddened to read this news. I used to love to read Steve's columns in Milo and became a huge fan of Cellar Dwellers (on DVD). I never met Steve in person but communicated with him on Facebook. In the brief encounters I had with him, he was very accommodating, polite and gracious. He was one of the few people in the Iron Game that I looked forward to reading his original content and I admired him in a lot of ways. Rest in Peace Steve.
  22. 4 points
    Best part was when he couldn't quite lift it. I went over and picked it up and said, "don't worry buddy, only Thor can lift it." Looked at me like wait a minute, is my dad Thor? Haha
  23. 4 points
    Hello! It is not hard to brake records, it is hard to oprain official equipment eligble for records. I prefer to compete against the strongest, I am not so interested in braking the records alone.
  24. 4 points
    @JHenze646 your wait is over.
  25. 4 points
    I’m exhausted from a good bending workout today. I made some progress on the Edgin. Photo below. I did a 5.5” Bastard DO to about 3”. I wanted to do a reverse cert bend for the 6” x 1/4” Square Stainless Steel. I did the bend but found out it was just over 30 seconds when I watched the video. I went for 1 last hit I probably did not need. Here is that video. I tried the 6.5” Golden Bastard DU, thinking I would get it because the 7” was not to bad, but it was tough and only went to 20 degrees. I finished up with some braced bending ISOs and a scroll I tried to coil tight that is pictured below.
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