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Mark Henry's Inch Dumbbell Lift: A New View

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LAINE SNOOK

I was asking the question, because of the way the dumbbell turned...it moved straight up, without a hint of even starting to turn then it seemed to start turning very high up on the chest and actually seemed to be over Mark's head and still turning.  I think it may have made contact, turning the dumbbell quickly just doesn't happen and in Mark's attempt it looks like the dumbbell actually completely changes direction from its original path.  I have had some limited experience with the Inch clean, and all I can say is that the dumbbell seems to be behaving in a very odd way.

 

Answers on a postcard please.

 

Laine

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Climber028

Can somepne explain to me why body contact is a bad thing. I would have thought that touching your body would slow it down and add resistance making it harder but it sounds like I'm way off base. 

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Alawadhi
20 minutes ago, Climber028 said:

Can somepne explain to me why body contact is a bad thing. I would have thought that touching your body would slow it down and add resistance making it harder but it sounds like I'm way off base. 

No one said it's a bad thing. Just not 100% perfect clean (still veeeeeery strong). And no it's easier to turn the bell. See at rich williams Inch clean. He had to touch his body if he didn't he couldn't. He did few attempts after his body touch clean and couldn't.

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LAINE SNOOK
59 minutes ago, Climber028 said:

Can somepne explain to me why body contact is a bad thing. I would have thought that touching your body would slow it down and add resistance making it harder but it sounds like I'm way off base. 

If you touch the globe on your body it helps the dumbbell turn, rather than using wrist strength.  Turning the Inch is the hard part, and if it comes up straight, without any initiation of the turn...it won't turn. Full stop.  Touching the body makes it start turning...one side slows down, so the other speeds up - that's something to do with Newton.

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climber511
1 hour ago, Climber028 said:

Can somepne explain to me why body contact is a bad thing. I would have thought that touching your body would slow it down and add resistance making it harder but it sounds like I'm way off base. 

It has to do with the definition of a "clean".  Way back (nothing to do with the Inch) a clean had to be lifted to the shoulders "clean" of the body - meaning no contact.  Over the years a "cleans" meaning has changed (in Olympic lifting - and certainly in Strongman) - the words meaning in this case is being applied to "cleaning the Inch".  

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Climber028
13 minutes ago, LAINE SNOOK said:

If you touch the globe on your body it helps the dumbbell turn, rather than using wrist strength.  Turning the Inch is the hard part, and if it comes up straight, without any initiation of the turn...it won't turn. Full stop.  Touching the body makes it start turning...one side slows down, so the other speeds up - that's something to do with Newton.

Thanks that's very helpful, I was only considering the vertical movement not the fact that the dumbbell has to rotate into position 

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