Jump to content

Brian Shaw Easily lifts Gigantor Blob


Boulderbrew

Recommended Posts

And these formulas don’t take into account height. Obviously easier to be a muscular lifter at 5’2” in a low class as

opposed to 6’2

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 129
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Mike Rinderle

    29

  • Chez

    11

  • climber511

    10

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

If he spent 3 months learning the technical aspects of the grip lifts, he could break EVERY record in grip... in one contest.  Don't kid yourselves.  He's on another planet size and strength wise than

I said it to Strossen ten or so years ago.  "Grip is the last bastion for the "normal" man."

These topics always go this way, and I know better than to stick around and argue, but weight classes and formulas don't exist to make people feel better about themselves. You might be of the opinion

Posted Images

Mikael Siversson

Which I also stated if you look a bit more closely.

 

This does not fully apply if you change your muscle mass at a given height, only if you scale things up or down.

Edited by Mikael Siversson
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Mikael Siversson said:

Which I also stated if you look a bit more closely.

 

This does not fully apply if you change your muscle mass at a given height, only if you scale things up or down.

Yes and that is easy to figure out with very linear things like the weight of a block of known metal that has a known density etc like steel......obviously not that straight forward with a person. 

Edited by Chez
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Rinderle

When I eat Reese's Cups my strength cubes no matter what my weight.  

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Mike Rinderle said:

When I eat Reese's Cups my strength cubes no matter what my weight.  

I wanna live in that world 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Mike Rinderle said:

When I eat Reese's Cups my strength cubes no matter what my weight.  

I just took a big dump so I lost weight......I’m weaker now mike

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Rinderle
11 minutes ago, Chez said:

I just took a big dump so I lost weight......I’m weaker now mike

McDonald's is the answer.  Nothing more anabolic than a calorie... except a McDonald's* calorie.  Have you ever seen a skinny person that eats at McDonald's twice a day? I thought not!

*The one exception might be the air in Walmart. They're obviously pumping some anabolic aerosols into that place.  The average weight of a scooter rider there is 4 bills.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chez said:

does anyone know the allometric scoring formula..........I’m curious what Shaw has to lift on the axle to beat someone in 93k (205 lbs) class who lifts 400 or just over 400. Let’s say Shaw weighs 440 at the time (his weight flactuates but he’s weighed this in competition before)

 

Unfortunately I don't think much research has been done specifically for axle deadlift.  A Wilkes score would probably be a good starting place.  Using https://wilkscalculator.com/lbs I get just under a 114 wilkes for a 205 lifter lifting 400 for a 440 lifter to get the same total he'd need to lift 472.5.  There are some caveats to this though 1 the wilkes score is unfavorably biased against heavier lifters for the deadlift.  I don't know how much but I doubt it would be so much as to require lifting above 500.  The other problem is this is for the standard deadlift not the axel.  I don't think grip is as correlated with size as other lifts, it is definitely correlated but I don't think it is to the same degree as powerlifts like the deadlift in general.  This would lead me to think the number should be lower than the 500 and perhaps closer to the 472.5 but then you have the effect of hand size specifically on lifts like the axle deadlift.  Given the effect of handsize I'd think maybe height and size would help even more than it would for a normal lift.  I'd say call it even at round about 500 pounds.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Twirdman said:

I don't think grip is as correlated with size as other lifts, it is definitely correlated but I don't think it is to the same degree as powerlifts like the deadlift in general.

Yes, I agree with this and have always said it. The biggest advantage in grip using these formulas is a short guy (the shorter height allows him to maintain muscle at a lower weight) who lifts and has bigger than average hands. These guys will always dominate when using formulas in grip. 

The weight becomes more of non issue in grip when you have a 400 + lb deadlift since this is a huge milestone on the axle and the heaviest of our traditional events 

Edited by Chez
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If someone lifts more weight than us they are stronger... period... regardless of weight. Strength does not continue at a rate astronomical to weight once one passes the 200-250 level, otherwise all 400 pound weight trainers would be benching 800 and deadlifting 1200. Ain’t happening. 200 pound guys benching 400 and deadlifting 800? Absolutely! It’s that simple. It’s comparing apples to oranges when comparing a 200 pounder to a 400 pounder. The human tissues have a limit to where the stress will start to destroy the body. That’s why you don’t see people deadlift 2000 at 500 pounds. Believe it or not but there are limits. I wish there weren’t,but there are.

Link to post
Share on other sites
climber511

Given a similar degree of muscularity  and degree of training a bigger man should always have the "potential" to be stronger - especially in overall body strength.  Expressions of grip strength differs somewhat because of the effects of hand size on so many grip events but generally bigger is better.  The other elephant in the room is trying to compare the training of even a serious recreational lifter to the training of a top flight 400# plus Professional Strongman.  Brian routinely "trains" with poundage's most people have never managed even the first single with in their life.  Given similar levels of specific training he "should be" stronger but it's not linear.

Edited by climber511
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike Rinderle

Brian squats 200kg from depth and a dead stop every time he gets up off the crapper.  Just sayin.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Squeezus

I tossed some data into the allometric scoring formula to answer the question that @Chez was asking about. I took the best axle lift from the 59kg class, @Electron, and the 93kg class, @Eric Roussin, and then figured out what Brian would need to lift to meet the allometric score of @Eric Roussin. As you can see it would be a 681lb (308.9kg) lift at 190kg bodyweight (the average weight in his wiki page). I doubt that will ever happen, mainly because you will never find a version of Eric's phenotype with the same training methods scaled up 2x. Eric is built and trained to lift thickbar. Brian is built and trained to be enormous and strong.

Lifter Weight (kg) Axle Lift (lb) Axle Lift (kg) Allometric Score
Yori 59 264 119.7 7.90
Eric 93 423 191.9 9.35
Brian 190 681 308.9 9.35

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage
54 minutes ago, Squeezus said:

 

I tossed some data into the allometric scoring formula to answer the question that @Chez was asking about. I took the best axle lift from the 59kg class, @Electron, and the 93kg class, @Eric Roussin, and then figured out what Brian would need to lift to meet the allometric score of @Eric Roussin. As you can see it would be a 681lb (308.9kg) lift at 190kg bodyweight (the average weight in his wiki page). I doubt that will ever happen, mainly because you will never find a version of Eric's phenotype with the same training methods scaled up 2x. Eric is built and trained to lift thickbar. Brian is built and trained to be enormous and strong.

Lifter Weight (kg) Axle Lift (lb) Axle Lift (kg) Allometric Score
Yori 59 264 119.7 7.90
Eric 93 423 191.9 9.35
Brian 190 681 308.9 9.35

 

Well its probably more just the fact that its 309kg!! He probably wasn't as strong as he is now no but Mark Felix was a decent bit stronger than Brian at rolling thunder when they competed and Mark is just as strong with both hands + I can tell you Brian was absolutely massive that day as I talked to him for a good half hour prior to (his forearms were as big as my head) and Marks best ever axle in contest was 220kg, often getting 210kg. 309kg is a crazy number, if anyone did anything close to that it would insane at any bodyweight.

Edit - Also definitely higher at 6 foot 8 but in my experience (at 6 foot 3) bodyweight increase doesn't equal grip strength when you get over 100kg. Ive had similar grip strength at 95kg as I have at 175kg. For lower weight classes its definitely a factor.

Edited by Paul Savage
Link to post
Share on other sites
David_wigren

I wouldn’t be surprised if Brian pulled 250-280 kg on an axle if he really applied himself for a year or two. Sure, he already trains his grip but it’s not his primary focus. 

In a way, I think it might be disrespectful to diminish any current record holder by speculating how much more a certain athlete would lift if he bothered. But at the same time we have to be real. Like Rindo mentioned earlier, Jason Bergmann is a great example. Though it took him a little longer than 3 months to make minced meat out of us. Jason contacted me in the middle of the spring in 2012 and at that point he had already been bending horseshoes for a short while. He didn’t take the first spot until late autumn or early winter that year. So 6 months is probably closer to the truth. And then he went on for another 4-5 months after that where he really left the rest of us in the dust. So it took him 10-11 months to set the record which noone else has ever come close to. I don’t dare to think what he could’ve done if he kept it up for 4-5 years. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage
1 hour ago, David_wigren said:

I wouldn’t be surprised if Brian pulled 250-280 kg on an axle if he really applied himself for a year or two. Sure, he already trains his grip but it’s not his primary focus. 

In a way, I think it might be disrespectful to diminish any current record holder by speculating how much more a certain athlete would lift if he bothered. But at the same time we have to be real. Like Rindo mentioned earlier, Jason Bergmann is a great example. Though it took him a little longer than 3 months to make minced meat out of us. Jason contacted me in the middle of the spring in 2012 and at that point he had already been bending horseshoes for a short while. He didn’t take the first spot until late autumn or early winter that year. So 6 months is probably closer to the truth. And then he went on for another 4-5 months after that where he really left the rest of us in the dust. So it took him 10-11 months to set the record which noone else has ever come close to. I don’t dare to think what he could’ve done if he kept it up for 4-5 years. 

 

There was a video of him (shaw) almost getting 220kg on the axle after 3 reps at 200kg from way back. He was already doing major grip feats back then and hasn't shown a whole lot of improvement in grip strength at least on the frame at worlds strongest man apart from this year where he got it all the way with no drops. Again he's had nerve damage, fatter hands from weight gain may not help and he's had tons of other things to try improve as well (obviously doing a brilliant job). Felix would always win the grip events against Brian and others if you look through Hercules holds or car deadlift holds no straps in the past. Also its worth taking note that Brian used a mixed grip to clean the the 182(?)kg axle at the last Arnold classic, which he's torn a bicep doing before so it makes zero sense that he wouldnt double overhand it if grip wasn't an issue, was last event etc Obviously this is just educated guessing at best and I'm sure if Brian was asked he would tell you what he can either do or give you an accurate idea if he doesn't do overhand axle deads or if he doesn't do them heavy but I think 250-280kg is probably beyond him (again he already trains his grip hard and axle is something he's very used to having hold of). Obviously he is strong as hell at blobs and pinch etc has excellent thumb strength.

One where it does make sense for him to be able to do a huge axle is Terry Hollands as one, he has always trained with double overhand on the cleans and for deadlifts as grip training (even do cleaning up over 200kg at the Arnold's) and of course we seen him pull a 240kg axle. Think he did 242.5kg in training for it. Could possibly better that now with skinnier hands after losing weight too. Pretty sure i remember him doing a 130kg rolling thunder as well, might have even been 130kg in plates but would have to see if the videos still about. Think he said he had done something crazy like 340 or 360kg Do pull on a normal bar too.

Edited by Paul Savage
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage

Can only find this 128kg lefty.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage

This is Brian's old axle vid I mentioned, looked like it was slipping at lockout but not very clear. Should be 220kg unless thats a scaffold pipe.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage

New grip video from Brian. Not watched it myself yet but certainly doing great things for gripsport putting out these videos if he can smash all the records or not.

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Squeezus said:

 

I tossed some data into the allometric scoring formula to answer the question that @Chez was asking about. I took the best axle lift from the 59kg class, @Electron, and the 93kg class, @Eric Roussin, and then figured out what Brian would need to lift to meet the allometric score of @Eric Roussin. As you can see it would be a 681lb (308.9kg) lift at 190kg bodyweight (the average weight in his wiki page). I doubt that will ever happen, mainly because you will never find a version of Eric's phenotype with the same training methods scaled up 2x. Eric is built and trained to lift thickbar. Brian is built and trained to be enormous and strong.

Lifter Weight (kg) Axle Lift (lb) Axle Lift (kg) Allometric Score
Yori 59 264 119.7 7.90
Eric 93 423 191.9 9.35
Brian 190 681 308.9 9.35

 

Thanks Gil. I’m not trying to be a jerk. Weight classes are best we got. The formulas make it near impossible for larger guys to compete. The other problem we got is our competitons are small so many of our comps only have 2-3 guys per weight class. It’s a difficult problem to fix. 

 

One thing I hate hearing is people thinking strength goes up in a linear fashion with size. That is just absolutely ridiculous  

 

i have pointed out in the past, half the lifts we have in the lightest class are children. We do not have anywhere near enough data for a grip formula to work

Edited by Chez
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Paul Savage said:

New grip video from Brian. Not watched it myself yet but certainly doing great things for gripsport putting out these videos if he can smash all the records or not.

 


I just watched this video.  It is insane how easily he did the lifts.  Seeing it I wonder if he can lift a millennium or 2.

Edited by Twirdman
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chez said:

Thanks Gil. I’m not trying to be a jerk. Weight classes are best we got. The formulas make it near impossible for larger guys to compete. The other problem we got is our competitons are small so many of our comps only have 2-3 guys per weight class. It’s a difficult problem to fix. 

 

One thing I hate hearing is people thinking strength goes up in a linear fashion with size. That is just absolutely ridiculous  

 

i have pointed out in the past, half the lifts we have in the lightest class are children. We do not have anywhere near enough data for a grip formula to work

I hate the belief in strength increasing  “linear fashion” or the “your strong because of your size” crowd myself Chez... or the “I’m stronger pound for pound one line. Like I said... if someone lifts more weight than me or anyone else, they are the stronger man at that Moment.... regardless of size.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Climber028

People just like to use relative strength and absolute strength interchangeably. Say what you mean and there's no discrepancy. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chez said:

The formulas make it near impossible for larger guys to compete.

All the formulas do is match the average top lifter in each weight class. If someone doesn't fare well with their coefficient score, then they are either weak or could benefit from dropping a weight class or two. This is why someone like Brian Shaw wouldn't do well with a Wilks formula, you'd be applying a weight class type equation to a non-weight class athlete. If Brian cared to drop his extra bodyfat to be competitive, his score would be through the roof.

Wilks is specifically designed for powerlifting, but even using that one unaltered still works fairly well. There have been a few forum grip contests that have used them, sometimes the 190 lb guy wins, sometimes the 245 lb guy wins.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Savage
58 minutes ago, Twirdman said:


I just watched this video.  It is insane how easily he did the lifts.  Seeing it I wonder if he can lift a millennium or 2.

Yes seen it now. Well a big difference is that with these his hand is wedged between the two globes stopping a lot of the rotation (not his fault obviously but its a factor). With the millennium that wouldn't happen. Then you have to factor in that they are nowhere close to each other in weight, so it really isn't any indication. Be interesting to see if there's another video of him cleaning one of those inches.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy policies.