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Comparing Bones Of Human To Big Primates


Arne

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I have some bones of primates. If we are looking at the bones of humerus and forearm of (from left) orangutan, gorilla, human, and chimpanzee, we can easily see how weak humans are, especially in our forearm region. The gorilla is totally outstanding! Even the forearms bones of the chimpanzee indicate an incredible arm and grip strenght. Note the very long forearm bones of the orangutan.

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Most likely mine would look like the gorilla's. Not sure about you and brian but I suspect that they'd somewhat resemble the structure of a platypus forearm.

If you care to wrestle a lowland gorilla, I will happily watch with popcorn and whiskey.

Here you can clearly see the idividual difference in the biceps muscles insertion point (Tuberositas bicipitis radii) on the proximal radius bone. I hope you can see which are the two strong individua

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Josh O'Dell

Thats cool man, but i must ask where did you get monkey bones and why lol

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Thats cool man, but i must ask where did you get monkey bones and why lol

I have bought them some years ago. :)

I've study osteology in the past.

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Josh O'Dell

Thats sweet man, its really amazing how strong they are! I read somewhere a chimp

Has 1400lbs of force in its grip???

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climber511

On a scale from weak to strong - humans are somewhere near the "sissy" end of the scale it appears. If it weren't for our brain we'd mostly be just food for the animals :).

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EricMilfeld

That's a great picture, Arne! It would be interesting to see how a "Brian Shaw" forearm structure would compare to someone like me, or Yori, here on the board. Sorry, Yori. Lol.

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I remember seeing a gorilla in tv. He was sitting and eating bamboo. He cracked a thick piece - must have been at least 2 inches thick - with ease. That was something to see..

I wonder how hard his feat is compared to sth like a rednail?

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Josh O'Dell

I bet he could bend a rednail like a twizzler

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That's a great picture, Arne! It would be interesting to see how a "Brian Shaw" forearm structure would compare to someone like me, or Yori, here on the board. Sorry, Yori. Lol.

Most likely mine would look like the gorilla's. Not sure about you and brian but I suspect that they'd somewhat resemble the structure of a platypus forearm.

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EricMilfeld

That's a great picture, Arne! It would be interesting to see how a "Brian Shaw" forearm structure would compare to someone like me, or Yori, here on the board. Sorry, Yori. Lol.

Most likely mine would look like the gorilla's. Not sure about you and brian but I suspect that they'd somewhat resemble the structure of a platypus forearm.

But like a super strong platypus, right?
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These primates you talk about are strong, but their strength is exaggerated. Saying a gorilla is 20x stronger than a man is inaccurate. For one, who is this man? An average 135 lb weakling or someone like Big Z or Brian Shaw?

When people say chimps are 4x stronger than men, and can't explain any further, they should lose credibility then and there. 4x stronger at what? Pressing? Pulling? And even then, a 150 lb chimp is not going to deadlift 1000 lbs, or bench 700 raw.

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That's a great picture, Arne! It would be interesting to see how a "Brian Shaw" forearm structure would compare to someone like me, or Yori, here on the board. Sorry, Yori. Lol.

Thank you Eric! :)

There is a big correlation between muscle strenght and bone strength/massivity.

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Can bone structure dictate strength potential?

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Can bone structure dictate strength potential?

Yes, if I understand your question correctly..?

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EricMilfeld

These primates you talk about are strong, but their strength is exaggerated. Saying a gorilla is 20x stronger than a man is inaccurate. For one, who is this man? An average 135 lb weakling or someone like Big Z or Brian Shaw?

When people say chimps are 4x stronger than men, and can't explain any further, they should lose credibility then and there. 4x stronger at what? Pressing? Pulling? And even then, a 150 lb chimp is not going to deadlift 1000 lbs, or bench 700 raw.

Some great points. The question of a chimp deadlifting 1000 pounds gets a little tricky, though. With their long arms and short legs an oly bar loaded to half a ton would have little, if any, movement with the chimp holding it at "lockout". But beyond that, 150 pound men have pulled 700 plus pounds, so it seems very plausible for a chimp of similar size to pull a thousand, even if the chimp was standing on blocks to increase the ROM to that of a human.
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Ivarboneless

I laughed so hard at Eric's comment. Eric forgot to mention whether he was talking about Yori's normal arm or his monkey arm. Based on Yori's impressive pinch to BW ratio, and the overall strength of his pinch, I suspect his monkey arm has at least chimp sized bones to go with its orangutan length. That said, I predict a noticeable increase in bone size if Yori stays true to his word and follows Eric's DL advice. The future of Yori's normal arm is uncertain, but his monkey arm shows distinct orangutan possibilities.

I have always been skeptical of the "Chimps are ____X stronger than a human" claims for the reasons mentioned above. While I concede that at certain activities chimpanzees may be stronger, perhaps significantly stronger, the bones of a chimp and human look to be very close in size to my eye. It is hard to fully assess the size because the human bones are oriented differently than all the ape bones. However, based on my evaluation of those bones, I find it unlikely that chimpanzees are as strong as popular culture portrays them. That said, I have never worked in close proximity with chimpanzees, so I may be mistaken. Sometimes life can be surprising, and you really have to see it to believe it.

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Mike Sharkey

These primates you talk about are strong, but their strength is exaggerated. Saying a gorilla is 20x stronger than a man is inaccurate. For one, who is this man? An average 135 lb weakling or someone like Big Z or Brian Shaw?

When people say chimps are 4x stronger than men, and can't explain any further, they should lose credibility then and there. 4x stronger at what? Pressing? Pulling? And even then, a 150 lb chimp is not going to deadlift 1000 lbs, or bench 700 raw.

You're wrong about that. Their strength is off the chart. There's plenty of documentation in regards to this dating back more than 100 years. I don't know if they have this where you are, but where I live we have this thing called "Google". You should try it out.

The difficult part in actually measuring a great ape's strength by our standards is getting the beast to understand what you want him to do.

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I've googled left and right and have found minimal legitimate documentation, most of it are claims that don't seem as an accurate way to measure overrall body strength.

And there are humans with off the chart strength...

And there are humans with off the chart strength...

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And if there's so much documentation, as according to you there is, please show me and prove me wrong outright. Because I don't see good, quality evidence besides articles of hopeless pathetic humans afraid to fight back get their ass whooped and certain cases of a chimp or other primate lifting a heavy object or something like that (nothing that a well trained human isnt capable of)

Most humans, who don't train, are not very strong naturally, and some are actually very weak (few are an exception) so when these bone head "scientists" say...4x stronger than man, again, what strength is considered average?

And being 4x stronger than an average man is not that impressive in the big picture comparing chimps to humans. I'm SURE Brian Shaw is at least 4x stronger than an average man.

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I'd like to see a orangutan try to close the BB world class or try to lift the millenium dumbbell

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Mike Sharkey

I've googled left and right and have found minimal legitimate documentation, most of it are claims that don't seem as an accurate way to measure overrall body strength.

And there are humans with off the chart strength...

And there are humans with off the chart strength...

If you care to wrestle a lowland gorilla, I will happily watch with popcorn and whiskey.

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If you care to contribute to this discussion...well that'd be cool.

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Mike Sharkey

If you care to contribute to this discussion...well that'd be cool.

Maybe you could show me a 475# row. That seems productive.

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Stephen Ruby

Pretty cool find, the way their muscles attach to the bone is also a big reason for the increased strength among other reasons.

I remember reading a 80lb female chimp could snap ironwood tree branches with her fingertips. The same scientist who saw this -a normal sized man- had to use both his hands and full strength to snap equal sized branch. The honest answer is studying their anatomy we can't fully explain why they are so strong. We do notice the minor differences like attachment point and density but still the strength gap is huge even give these advantages. I imagine its some physio-chemical reasons also. This is in comparing chimps btw.

With advanced in material science we are creating artificial muscles so imagine the future potential that could do for are own bodies as well as robotics.

"They can lift about 100 times heavier weight and generate about 100-times higher power than natural muscle of the same weight and length."

http://io9.com/scientists-just-created-some-of-the-most-powerful-muscl-1526957560

Edited by Stephen Ruby
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