Jump to content

Number Of Reps To Gain Stegth On Coc Grippers


Jeremy Sipple

Recommended Posts

Wannagrip

"That is a very complex subject and needs to be discussed in detail for it to be done right."

I guess you could say Joe Kinney did something right with negatives without having detailed explanation. No one has come even close to his level of crushing strength. Grinding a #4 and having the ability (probably) to do reps is what he achieved. Did he pay the price for it? Probably.

His take on grip training was pretty simple and needed no detailed discussion. Then again, I don't think anyone has used his program verbatim and achieved his results. People just grasping the simple aspect of progression will lead many onwards towards better gains.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 172
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • nagual

    39

  • John Wood

    18

  • Wannagrip

    12

  • speedy

    12

Really would like to know the following: when doing the negatives with a #3 to get to #2 and doing negatives with #4 to get to #3 was it effective? Also, when you did the negatives were you really able to close them entirely for the hold?

I posted what I did about negatives because he says he has been trying to add reps and his gains are slow. I know for me, repping didn't work well, or not as well as I wanted.

When I was working on closing the #2, I was doing negatives with the #3. When closing the #3, negatives with the #4. I think any time someone on the board asks for training advice, it should be assumed that all training styles presented may not work for them, without having to put up a disclaimer. When I see these threads asking for advice, I just post what has worked for me.

In my opinion, bickering over training styles will only cause people to stop replying to posts asking for training advice. Just my .02

Link to post
Share on other sites
"That is a very complex subject and needs to be discussed in detail for it to be done right."

I guess you could say Joe Kinney did something right with negatives without having detailed explanation.  No one has come even close to his level of crushing strength.  Grinding a #4 and having the ability (probably) to do reps is what he achieved.  Did he pay the price for it?  Probably.

His take on grip training was pretty simple and needed no detailed discussion.  Then again, I don't think anyone has used his program verbatim and achieved his results. People just grasping the simple aspect of progression will lead many onwards towards better gains.

what do you mean ''did he pay the price for it''?

is he having hand problems now or something?

Link to post
Share on other sites
HAMMERHEAD

Iman 74-

There is an excellent article by Gorilla Hands specifically answering your question. Forget the link. Should be easy to find.

In know what you're talking 'bout working the "hold" wile doing a heavy neg. on a gripper you can't close. Basically you're not working the hold. The gripper will open up to where you can hold it.

In order to train the "hold" or "closed" portion while doing a negative the best option is a grip machine. This is because you can "hold" the handles closed with more weight than you will be able to sweep closed.

I got this from Gorilla Hands and I have found this to be true with my own experience as well.

-HH

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wannagrip

I am not exactly sure what made Joe retire from grip. It was said it was other medical problems so I may be all wet. I don't think he got injured?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I am not exactly sure what made Joe retire from grip. It was said it was other medical problems so I may be all wet. I don't think he got injured?

I do believe however that he claims his hands still hurt from his training, read this

in a response letter to one of Sybersnotts inquiries to him.

Those negs need a LOT of recovery time....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Snott you say some guys do reps and you can't stop that.

Matt, they like to do reps because they like to massage their egos, NOT necessarily because it strengthens their grip.

I know Heath mentioned the John Wood does a lot of rep work. He also told me that he prefers more than what might be average reps. Would you try to talk a guy like him into training different?
No, and why should I? If he makes gains in his grip strength - then it doesn't make dog-doody what I tell him. After all, making gains is the goal - NOT how many or few reps you can bang out in a session.
I have also talked to a guy who use to train guys and had plenty of them with unreal grips. He also mentioned high reps were a staple in the grip department.

Who is THIS guy and what is his training method?? High reps in what sense? I do reps on a grip machine... but I don't do them on the grippers - I've already stated that.

Maybe your the one who doesn't know how to train.

I'm a COC and a level 1 Mash Monster -- you're right... I don't know what I'm doing. :rolleyes

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wannagrip

"I have also talked to a guy who use to train guys and had plenty of them with unreal grips. He also mentioned high reps were a staple in the grip department."

I have a feeling these guys were far from your average Joe's in the physical department? You put them on practically ANY program and they would get unreal grips or had them by default when compared to your average Joe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This is a good thread.  Let's not ruin it with BS.

Wait a minute. He asked, I answered. I don't think that's BS.

He can agree to disagree with me if he likes. I do take exception to people telling me that "you don't know how to train"... :dry

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wannagrip
When you are talking about gaining strength, the amount of reps is secondary to the way they are performed.

You don't mean the aspect of speed-strength/strength-speed with a duck egg chaser do you John? :upsidedwn

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to over 70 reps on the #1

but still only one rep with the #2.

REps are cool but gaining strenght you must increase the load.

For example, If can do 11 or 15 reps on the #1 ironmind then consider the

Beefbuilder super advance that will increase the load of 20 extra pounds.

THe inbetween gripper.

Or #2 to #3 try inbetween like the Beefbuilder super master.

Or the famous #4 how you going to reach try inbetween gripper.

bbElite,bbse, etc.

If you can do strap holds from the #3 ironmind for 12 pounds try the BBE,

And once reach another 12 pounds with the bbe, go for the BBSE,

BBGe, etc. BUt focus, planning, success. and keep a jounrnal for gripper

wach day you workout on them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
king crusher

i do low,moderate and high reps depending on how i feel that day.

i train to how my body feels. for everything.

and im pretty well rounded in everything i try.

everyone is different and needs to train in such a way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, everyone is different. However, the processes which allow strength gains to occur are exactly the same for everyone.

You can get visciously strong with either low reps or high reps, provided you know exactly what these processes are and how to account for them in your routine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hasn't this topic been discussed ad infinitum already?

I would still like to see someone gain strength with a tougher gripper by simply doing progressively more (regular) reps with a weaker gripper. I would say that anything over 20 reps with the weaker gripper is useless for gaining strength with the tougher gripper.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wannagrip
Hasn't this topic been discussed ad infinitum already?

I would still like to see someone gain strength with a tougher gripper by simply doing progressively more (regular) reps with a weaker gripper.  I would say that anything over 20 reps with the weaker gripper is useless for gaining strength with the tougher gripper.

Topics come up in cycles in forum. This topic is no different. I'm sure not everyone currently here was around in previous discussions. ;)

I think John Wood is the example of someone who I believe the majority of his training was doing progressively more reps with a weaker gripper.

Progression is KEY regardless of the rep/set scheme used.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt Van Weele

What about 100 reps nagual. Could anyone get strong doing this many reps?

Link to post
Share on other sites
What about 100 reps nagual. Could anyone get strong doing this many reps?

Well, this obviously depends on your definition of "strength" .

I would say, that when talking about strength, by default you are talking about "max strength" or "1RM strength", or somewhere in that vicinity.

But let's give a more pragmatic example.

Say that you can do 50 reps with a #1.

You keep training and at some point you manage 100 reps with the #1.

Would you be progressing? Yes.

Would you be more endurant with the #1? Yes.

Would you be stronger, i.e. would it help you close the #2? No.

Muscular endurance and max strength are two very different things, although they do overlap.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On a related note:

I have a theory that when you gain strength you automatically gain endurance strength, but with a much lower weight.

Let me illustrate:

A beginner benchpresser can bench 100lbs for 5 reps. With the bar itself he can probably get 30-50 reps.

He always trains with low reps.

After a couple of years he can bench 300lbs x 5.

He can now rep with the bar all day basically, and bench 100lbs for 30-50 reps.

My theory is, that although the subject hasn't increased his muscular endurance any, his baselevel of strength increases and when the weight drops below a certain percentage of your maxstrength it hardly taxes the muscles anymore.

(Notice that I am excluding cardiovascular endurance from the equation.... I'm not comparing marathon runners with powerlifters.)

A useful analogy would be, liftin a fork all day vs lifting a 10lbs dumbell all day.

It feels like there is a flaw in my theory somewhere... but I can't find it... ;)

Edited by nagual
Link to post
Share on other sites
Hasn't this topic been discussed ad infinitum already?

I would still like to see someone gain strength with a tougher gripper by simply doing progressively more (regular) reps with a weaker gripper.  I would say that anything over 20 reps with the weaker gripper is useless for gaining strength with the tougher gripper.

Topics come up in cycles in forum. This topic is no different. I'm sure not everyone currently here was around in previous discussions. ;)

I think John Wood is the example of someone who I believe the majority of his training was doing progressively more reps with a weaker gripper.

Progression is KEY regardless of the rep/set scheme used.

Really? And here I though that topics were only meant to appear once! :dry

:D

Well, I would contend that after a certain amount of reps with a weaker gripper, you would not gain strength with a stronger gripper. This is what I was asking for.

Not trying to be obstinate, but I would really like to see an example of someone having increased his strength with a tougher gripper by, say, increasing his reps from 20 to 30 with a weaker gripper? Or better yet... let's make it 30 to 50 reps, or 30 to 100 reps. And this without training with the tougher gripper.

I don't think it is possible.

Edited by nagual
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy policies.