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andurniat

Training And Tips

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In need of some training ideas and tips. Links to good youtube videos would be great. I have a possible spot on a Japanese TV show 'Giant Killers', it puts 'amateurs' against Japanese professional sumo/baseball/athletes. This series' challenge will be arm wrestling. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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The best advise I think you could do with is start getting in table time once or twice a week with experienced pullers. You've got a lot of strength, now you just need to no how to apply it properly. Should be lots of locals willing to help. Ask on Facebook as well.

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Sounds pretty cool. I look forward to seeing you represent.

On the aw'ing, get with Paul.. He'll have you squared away on the table in a days time.

I assume (even though these guys are pros of some form or fashion of various sports) that they wont be pro armwrestlers.. So some table time practicing some basic moves should do the trick.

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Sounds pretty cool. I look forward to seeing you represent.

On the aw'ing, get with Paul.. He'll have you squared away on the table in a days time.

I assume (even though these guys are pros of some form or fashion of various sports) that they wont be pro armwrestlers.. So some table time practicing some basic moves should do the trick.

Correct, they are not pro arm wrestlers, which gives me a chance. I hope to have a table by this weekend and getting with Paul is tops on my list. Thanks

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If they are not professional armwrestlers, then you have a great chance. Learn how to toproll and feel comfortable at the table. This is the NUMBER ONE most important thing. Strength is definitely more important than technique on a professional level, but with good technique, you can wreck the amateur division.

I think toprolling would be your best bet given your height and handstrength, and it's also the easiest way to "out technique" someone who doesn't know what they're doing.

Watch:

John Brzenk

Engin Terzi

Mike Selearis

The general idea is not to pull straight sideways. You want to pull to corner opposite the arm your using on your side of the table, i.e., if competing right handed, you would pull to the left corner on your side of the table. NEVER let your wrist kink backwards like you're closing a gripper. NEVER. Do not squeeze the other man's hand even if he squeezes yours. You will tire yourself, your hand will kink back, and your hand is MORE VULNERABLE that way. Maintain an isometric stiffness.

When you step to the table right handed, keep your right foot forward (under the table a bit and in contact with the right table leg), hips into the table, left foot back a bit (not under the table) and out a bit wider than shoulder width and pointed parallel to the table edge your hips are touching, right elbow down on elbow pad, left hand grip the peg with your ELBOW UP IN THE AIR (not on the table top) so that you can lean sideways comfortably.

Your stance should be (if you were not with your arm on the table) your torso at about 45 degrees to the table with your feet making a 90 degree angle to each other, i.e., one foot should be perpendicular to the table edge on your side of the table and one should be parallel to it. That's the general stance, your get your arm on the table by leaving your feet stationary and rotating your torso.

When you train with Paul, don't focus on beating him even if you can. Focus on pulling the correct way especially if Paul can beat you. Practice isn't the match, so don't be concerned with beating the other guy. Concern yourself with developing strength properly.

Before you go to the match, REST is the most important thing. You will be a lot weaker if you have any pain whatsoever. It's kind of like trying to close big grippers while you have elbow tendonitis; you are just plain unable. Same thing. If your arm hurts, it will be weak.

Good luck.

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If they are not professional armwrestlers, then you have a great chance. Learn how to toproll and feel comfortable at the table. This is the NUMBER ONE most important thing. Strength is definitely more important than technique on a professional level, but with good technique, you can wreck the amateur division.

I think toprolling would be your best bet given your height and handstrength, and it's also the easiest way to "out technique" someone who doesn't know what they're doing.

Watch:

John Brzenk

Engin Terzi

Mike Selearis

The general idea is not to pull straight sideways. You want to pull to corner opposite the arm your using on your side of the table, i.e., if competing right handed, you would pull to the left corner on your side of the table. NEVER let your wrist kink backwards like you're closing a gripper. NEVER. Do not squeeze the other man's hand even if he squeezes yours. You will tire yourself, your hand will kink back, and your hand is MORE VULNERABLE that way. Maintain an isometric stiffness.

When you step to the table right handed, keep your right foot forward (under the table a bit and in contact with the right table leg), hips into the table, left foot back a bit (not under the table) and out a bit wider than shoulder width and pointed parallel to the table edge your hips are touching, right elbow down on elbow pad, left hand grip the peg with your ELBOW UP IN THE AIR (not on the table top) so that you can lean sideways comfortably.

Your stance should be (if you were not with your arm on the table) your torso at about 45 degrees to the table with your feet making a 90 degree angle to each other, i.e., one foot should be perpendicular to the table edge on your side of the table and one should be parallel to it. That's the general stance, your get your arm on the table by leaving your feet stationary and rotating your torso.

When you train with Paul, don't focus on beating him even if you can. Focus on pulling the correct way especially if Paul can beat you. Practice isn't the match, so don't be concerned with beating the other guy. Concern yourself with developing strength properly.

Before you go to the match, REST is the most important thing. You will be a lot weaker if you have any pain whatsoever. It's kind of like trying to close big grippers while you have elbow tendonitis; you are just plain unable. Same thing. If your arm hurts, it will be weak.

Good luck.

Outstanding information. Thank you greatly.

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I agree, this is all great advice!

Another good resource can be found here: http://oaa1.proboards.com/thread/1894/arm-wrestling-training-book-beginners

Here's hoping Andrew takes a liking to yet another strength sport! I would think he'd be a natural!

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Last year, some AW guys showed up to a grip comp in Tucson. All us grip guys who spent some time on the table that day were SORE for weeks afterwards!!! I have no AW experience, but I will say that in our experience easing into it, and building up the muscle/tendon strength is going to be key to injury prevention.

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Yes, soreness is very common when someone first starts practicing. The armwrestling movement is not a natural one, in that it is rarely replicated in day-to-day activities. Although I understand the temptation to go all out when someone attends their first practice, it's really best to just concentrate on learning basic positioning and movement.

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Andrew,

How long do you have? Are they offering prize money, or are you just doing it for the Craic? Seeing as you make your money out of training people (forgive if I am mistaken there) I'd question if it was worth the possible risk, unless it's something you really want to do.

And, out of interest, how do you qualify as an "Amateur"? :)

Chris

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I agree, this is all great advice!

Another good resource can be found here: http://oaa1.proboards.com/thread/1894/arm-wrestling-training-book-beginners

Here's hoping Andrew takes a liking to yet another strength sport! I would think he'd be a natural!

agreed. not only is he already strong, but he appears to have the ideal build for aw'ing, i.e. tall, lean, big hands, etc.

reminds me of Larratt's build. that alone is a hell of a tool. add some good technique and some sheer determination and he'll be, yet again, a beast at another strength sport involving arm/hand strength. I have no doubts.

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Andrew,

How long do you have? Are they offering prize money, or are you just doing it for the Craic? Seeing as you make your money out of training people (forgive if I am mistaken there) I'd question if it was worth the possible risk, unless it's something you really want to do.

And, out of interest, how do you qualify as an "Amateur"? :)

Chris

First round in Oct. 18-19 in LA, 2nd round in Japan in Nov., finals are Dec. 31 in Tokyo. Definitely weighing the risks/rewards of this. I believe I'm 'amateur' in that i don't play football/basketball/baseball.

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Dude. AWESOME. Go for it Andrew!!!

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Hi Andrew,

Saw this one some time ago. Big Magnus Samuelson showing some (beginner)techniques for arm wrestling.

Good luck!

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The worst lingering muscle pain trauma I ever had followed an impromptu arm wrestling match. As these more experienced guys say It is different ....much different than any normal lifting or sport strength activity. Please.....be careful in preparation.

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Back when I was young we all AWed quite a bit - and I did real well. Then I went to the military and still did well - right up to when I went up against a "real" AW that actually knew how and trained for it - he just about tore my arm off, I have never felt so dominated - it took months for my shoulder to heal :). Have fun - but be careful.

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The worst lingering muscle pain trauma I ever had followed an impromptu arm wrestling match. As these more experienced guys say It is different ....much different than any normal lifting or sport strength activity. Please.....be careful in preparation.

Yeah, I've had that too!

A guy I used to hang out with took on this small dude in a bar and he lost, mainly because he broke his upper arm..

Be careful!

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Any updates?

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Bump.

Any updates?

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Thanks for the links on the arm wrestling as well. Great info

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No updates yet?!

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Prob no updates because for a brand new armwrestler, they have absolutly zero idea what real armwrestling is. The biggest problem with crazy strong guys is that they are strong enough to break/damage their arm in a single match. This is typically what happens, your opponent dosnt break your arm, you break it by applying side pressure because that is all you know. The other side of the coin is that a guy you think you will crush, flashes you in less than a second and leaves your head spinning. I hope you ended up injury free and had a great time!

Armwrestling is in a catagory of its own and can only be learned by practicing with experienced, activly competitive armwrestlers for years. Typically, if you armwrestle competitively, you only armwrestle as the movements are completly unique to armwrestling. If you are a sucessful bodybuilder/powerlifter/gripster, it's best to stay away from armwrestling unless you have an active armwrestling team that you can practice with regurarly. It is always such a shame to see an arm break, bicept tear, tendons snap in a novice match when it's clear this individual has put years into training, working their ass off, being healthy and then BAM, a severe injury in seconds.

Armwrestling soreness is a unique severe pain, but nothing new to us glutens for punishment. Difference is it takes a year+ typically to condition your arms for pulling vs a couple weeks of training in BB/PL/CF.

Also, Armwrestling injuries are ALWAYS serious and usually take a year+ to recover from. Just not worth it if you are already successfull in you current dicipline. But beware, Armwrestling is as addictive as crack, and if you are lucky enough to hook up with a good team you will drop everything and become a pull junky haha. Hope the event went well, and if you get hooked we'll see eachother down the road!

PS: I just noticed Eric Roussin posted in this thread earlier, I haven't been on the board for a while, the buck stops with him. Legit pro class national champion and straight badass on the table. That's the guy to listen to, and MonkeyPaws if he's still around.

Take care brother, hope I helped.

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I was wondering what kind of gadgets you arm wrestlers use for training?

I've seen the big spring attached to a lever arm...I've seen different things for pull downs.

What else do you guys use?

I've always thought a suicide knob on a lever arm would make a great finger strengthener. It be like a small rolling thunder you could get your pinkie around. Just an idea....

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