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Interesting Tidbits


strongmitts

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strongmitts

I just finished a very in depth anatomy course in my first trimester of chiropractic school. I figured I might share a few interesting facts about the forearms.

Medial epicondyle-common point of attachment for flexors of wrist and hand (flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis)

Lateral epicondyle-common point of attachment for extensors of wrist and hand (extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digitorum, extensor digiti minimi, extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis longus)

The medial epicondyle is much larger than the lateral epicondyle.

Palmaris longus m.-flexor of the wrist (13% of people don’t have this muscle)

Flexor digitorum profundus-only muscle in forearm to flex the distal interphalangeal joint (most distal joint in fingers)

The digits are numbered 1-5 starting with the thumb.

Extensor digitorum communis m.-extends digits 2-5

Extensor digiti minimi m.-extends 5th digit (pinky)

Extensor indicus-extends 2nd digit (index finger)

The index and pinky finger have an extra muscle to extend them. (God must be a Texas fan)

The body is truly a work of art! I will be starting gross anatomy next trimester, and I can’t wait to dissect the forearms, hands, and wrist. I think this will take my hand, wrist, and forearm obsession to a whole new level!

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strongmitts,

A question, please.

Is it fact or fiction that the forearms are composed of more dense muscle fibers than other muscle groups. I have read that for years, but when I asked another young man who was studying anatomy, he looked at me like, 'What looney told you that!'

So?

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ianders1
do you see dead people ;) ?

LOL :laugh:laugh:laugh

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foggymountainmuscle

Thank you for the anatomy lesson.

First time I've heard that used non-sarcasticly. I like the term "common" when refering to insertion points. I often wonder what some freaks look like on the inside.

In my family, on the guys, the tendon of the flexor carpi radialis is thicker than most people's bicep tendon.

Roark, I speculate this claim refers to the musle fiber types in the forarms. The word dense though kinda confuses me, less intramuscular fat stored in the forearms, greater ratio of sineuous tissue to muscle tissue in the forarms, more slow muscle fibers that store more mitochondria? They all kinda make sense.... I know this wasn't my question to answer, but I am also very interested in this question.

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Coincidentally I've also been looking at the lower arm in my functional anatomy classes for Exercise and Sport Science. Every Thursday I have access to several arms dissected to different levels, and it's quite amazing to see the differences between each sample. There's always a large variation between the thickness of the tendons in the hand and a lot of samples have abnormalities, extra tendons, split tedons and the like.

Just thought I might add that the chunky muscle group in the hand at the base of the thumb that makes it look like a chicken drumstick is known as the "thenar eminence" and comprises of three muscles known as "flexor pollicis brevis", "abductor pollicis brevis", and "opponens pollicus" which lies deep to the other two.

The big muscle that's in the webbing of the thumb, between the thumb and forefinger is called "adductor pollicus".

And the muscles in the hand on the side of the pinky are known as the "hypothenar eminence".

The class has been really good for helping me understand which muscles do what in the hand and understanding the grip in a whole new way.

Oh and I've also been told that the grip is at its strongest in about 10-15 degrees of extension but I can't remember why off the top of my head, I'll look at my notes and post it later if anyones interested. It explains why it's so hard to close grippers with the wrist cocked.

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king crusher

the first post on this thread is to advanced for most everyone, including me. lol.

but i just did my trainer for 75 reps and waited 10 min and did my #1 for 50 reps....all the way closed to almost all the way open on each.

so i guess all those things you mentioned are working good on my forearm. lol....cuz they pumped up hardcore!!

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Davekline

I have always thought that most bodybuilding literature was deficient on anatomy info. Perhaps in the future this will change.

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strongmitts

Roark, I'd say this is fiction, but I'm not real clear on what is meant by "more dense". I agree with foggymountainmuscle. Although, I think the fiber make up of many of the guys on this board are more fast twitch than the average Joe.

First time I've heard that used non-sarcasticly. I like the term "common" when refering to insertion points. I often wonder what some freaks look like on the inside.

Not sure what you mean here?
the first post on this thread is to advanced for most everyone, including me. lol.

but i just did my trainer for 75 reps and waited 10 min and did my #1 for 50 reps....all the way closed to almost all the way open on each.

so i guess all those things you mentioned are working good on my forearm. lol....cuz they pumped up hardcore!!

:laugh:laugh

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Matt Van Weele

I have heard the calfs have dense fibers also. I'm guessing thats false too.

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I have heard the calfs have dense fibers also.

I've heard all this as well, that both the forearms and calves are somehow different and that you could work them more frequently. This is something I was told by my first weightlifting teacher.

It seems kind of ridiculous though, any muscle in your body still needs time to recuperate.

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strongmitts

Generally, smaller muscle groups recover faster than larger muscle groups. The muscles of the forearms and calves are predominantly slow twitch muscle fibers which recover faster. Jedd and Smitty can chime in any time now, as they are probably up to speed on the latest exercise physiology stuff.

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Finnegann
I've also been told that the grip is at its strongest in about 10-15 degrees of extension but I can't remember why off the top of my head, I'll look at my notes and post it later if anyones interested.

I'm definitely interested. Post it when you get a chance.

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