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yorkshire grip

chalk or no chalk

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yorkshire grip

ive got a question how many people don't use chalk while training grip?i never use chalk I like to train natural not sure if it will lead to more injuries but I find it is a true test of my strength with no aid plus ive never competed so if I did Im sure I would use chalk then.

if im going for a pb I will do it no chalk then try with chalk to see how much difference it makes.

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Fist of Fury

It's grip sport, not slip sport. Use chalk.

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Wannagrip
9 minutes ago, Fist of Fury said:

It's grip sport, not slip sport. Use chalk.

Agree!

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AdamTGlass

Never leave the house without wallet, blade, & chalk. 

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Stephen Anderson
4 hours ago, yorkshire grip said:

ive got a question how many people don't use chalk while training grip?i never use chalk I like to train natural not sure if it will lead to more injuries but I find it is a true test of my strength with no aid plus ive never competed so if I did Im sure I would use chalk then.

if im going for a pb I will do it no chalk then try with chalk to see how much difference it makes.

When i first started i had this theory that it would somehow make me so much stronger. But i think in the end its just a mental thing. Use chalk get the most out of your training! People who are elites in every sport mimic gameday during their training. 

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Joseph Sullivan

As far as real world, yes, there is no chalk involved. You aren’t going to say “hold on I need my chalk” if a situation arose where you needed your grip..... but in training for the sport you must train how you play. I didn’t use chalk in the beginning for the same reasons you stated. But I compete so I use chalk. I try to use as little as possible though. And a lot of times I don’t use any. The important thing is that it prevents slipping from sweat. That’s the safety of it. So it’s not really your grip giving out you have to worry about as much as the moisture your hands may produce that can cause a slip on more dangerous exercises. Chalk just created a surface that is consistent.

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Kluv#0

If you are going to compete use chalk on hands and light chalk on implements.  Occasionally, I will use no chalk implements to change my training up but still use light chalk on my paws. 

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climber511

I have a routine I use when training grip or competing in grip.  I clean my hands thoroughly with hand cleaning wipes and then lightly chalk.  Too much chalk can act as ball bearings so use sparingly.   I prep the implements also - brushing - wiping and even washing on occasion.  I don't plan to compete with chicken grease on my hands for example so I don't train that way.  I would rather have dry and super clean hands and no chalk than sweaty, greasy hands and chalk.  But I can have both easily enough so I do.

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yorkshire grip

All great feedback will take on board all the advice 

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Chez

I use light chalk most of the time. The only time I don’t is super smooth unseasoned equipment like my fbbc crusher. My crusher looks brand new so chalk doesn’t help and actually can hurt my lifts depending on the conditions. 

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wobbler

Need at least a light coating of chalk, helps prevent skin tears and keeps things consistent. When you're trying to add 0.25-0.5lb to a max lift each week, friction has to be as consistent as possible.

I don't like a bunch of loose chalk for anything (except bending.)

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Lucasraymond

Chalking is a science in itself; but like wobbler said above the only way to show improvement is to try to keep the texture as consistent as possible. This isnt always easy with varying levels of temp, humidity, your hydration level, type of material, painted vs raw steel, etc. sometimes a lot of chalk is the only way to get texture and other times not and sometimes different chalk works better based on the variables. 

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Blacksmith513

I plan on using it in the future... But right now,  I don't really think I need it, yet... 

 

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yorkshire grip

all great comments cheers

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