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Tommy J.

How to help alleviate golfers elbow

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Tommy J.
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Edited by Tommy J.
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Wannagrip

I have a rumble roller and roll out my triceps just like that 2 times a day. 

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Tommy J.
4 minutes ago, Wannagrip said:

I have a rumble roller and roll out my triceps just like that 2 times a day. 

‘Tis a godsend for golfers elbow

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Wannagrip
5 minutes ago, Tommy J. said:

‘Tis a godsend for golfers elbow

General triceps and elbow health period.  💪

I do full body rumble roller twice a day. No NSAIDS for me. No lower back pain. I basically do deep tissue massage on myself twice a day. The "studies" that say it is of no benefit to foam roll are bogus and or not being executed properly.  

I also use a lacrosse ball on my glutes per Joe DeFranco I saw in his video years ago.  BIG time tip I use 2 times per day following the rolling.

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Wannagrip
Just now, Wannagrip said:

General triceps and elbow health period.  💪

I do full body rumble roller twice a day. No NSAIDS for me. No lower back pain. I basically do deep tissue massage on myself twice a day. The "studies" that say it is of no benefit to foam roll are bogus and or not being executed properly.  

I also use a lacrosse ball on my glutes per Joe DeFranco I saw in his video years ago.  BIG time tip I use 2 times per day following the rolling.

Those studies probably didn't use 56 year olds with 40 years of training including over a decade of hard core powerlifting. ;)

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Tommy J.
12 minutes ago, Wannagrip said:

General triceps and elbow health period.  💪

I do full body rumble roller twice a day. No NSAIDS for me. No lower back pain. I basically do deep tissue massage on myself twice a day. The "studies" that say it is of no benefit to foam roll are bogus and or not being executed properly.  

I also use a lacrosse ball on my glutes per Joe DeFranco I saw in his video years ago.  BIG time tip I use 2 times per day following the rolling.

Who ever did those studies must be in cahoots with some kind of “rehab equipment” company that’s trying to push thousand dollar machines or something.. because rolling works great!

btw I’m curious, does rolling the glutes out help alleviate sciatica?

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Guest

Thanks for the shout out, Tommy. These work like magic. That extra triceps tension can wreak havoc in that region below. Jedd alerted me to that trick a while back when I was at the point I couldn’t even open a door without pain. Never happened again since. 

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Guest
Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, Wannagrip said:

General triceps and elbow health period.  💪

I do full body rumble roller twice a day. No NSAIDS for me. No lower back pain. I basically do deep tissue massage on myself twice a day. The "studies" that say it is of no benefit to foam roll are bogus and or not being executed properly.  

I also use a lacrosse ball on my glutes per Joe DeFranco I saw in his video years ago.  BIG time tip I use 2 times per day following the rolling.

Totally agree, but, it needs to be done regularly or those symptoms seem to return. They say that the rolling is just causing a neurological response that relaxes the muscles for a period of time, but doesn’t last. That seems to be the case for me as well. Will last a few days or so and then come back if I don’t stay diligent. I’m sure it’s because of muscle imbalance and can be corrected if we all figure out our imbalances, but that’s the hard part. I have not been able to piece it totally together, but the foam rolling is a God send even if it appears to be only temporary.  The one part it has totally helped us the triceps/elbow pain for some reason.

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Guest
17 minutes ago, Tommy J. said:

Who ever did those studies must be in cahoots with some kind of “rehab equipment” company that’s trying to push thousand dollar machines or something.. because rolling works great!

btw I’m curious, does rolling the glutes out help alleviate sciatica?

Yes it does, along with stretching the pirformis and strengthening the glutes. Release of the trigger points with the rolling, stretching to increase the space the sciatic nerve passes under the pirifomis and strengthening the glutes will help. The piriformis is like a belt that’s over the sciatic nerve, when it’s tight and weak it will cinch down on the sciatic and wreak havoc.

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climber511

Things that have helped me. 

I have my wife roll both sides of my forearms with the "Stick" when things flare up - she seems to enjoy it :).  Rumble roller on my back, glutes and hamstrings regularly.  I haven't tried the triceps roll shown here - mostly because I haven't had any triceps issues.  Hanging from a bar or one arm pulldowns with a stretch on the straight arm also seems to help with medial elbow issues - but be careful not to over do.  Regular stretching also seems to help keep things from occurring but not so much cure them after you get them.

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Tommy J.
Posted (edited)

Trying to like everyone’s posts here but am out of “likes” for the day..

Bill, can I have the cap removed on the amount of posts I’m allowed to like a day?

E96CBDAA-B653-4075-AEDC-A9DEFB1BCD8C.png

Edited by Tommy J.
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Alawadhi
2 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

 

 

Thanks for the tip. Yeah Joseph also told me this a while ago. Another thing that is good is dry needling with a experienced therapist. It really works like magic. And the good thing is you need to roll once a day or 2 or 3 days then the dry needling will help you for at least a month.

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Cannon
2 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

btw I’m curious, does rolling the glutes out help alleviate sciatica?

With sciatica, I think it's a personal matter.  All I mean is that there are a myriad of reasons for the sciatica.  Mine is due to totally effed L4/L5 and L5/S1 discs.  I have permanent numbness from my Achilles down into my left foot.  Curiously, pain often manifests in my foot in the same locations as the numbness.  Ain't nerve pain neat?  Otherwise it also crops up in the transition from the glute to the hamstring.  My actual discs are also a significant source of pain within themselves.  Rolling my glute/low back area is a guaranteed way for me to drum up inflammation that leads to increased pain.  So what I'm getting at is that I think any one person just needs to try and see if it helps their sciatica.  If the pain is due to a pinched nerve, I could really see an opportunity for relief.  Rolling works great on my legs when I'm doing lots of running.  IT band and those areas.  But I stay away from my glutes/low back.

I will say that I believe everyone with low back pain could hope for relief from strengthening the glutes.       

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Tommy J.

Interesting.. so get my glutes and lower back stronger. Tanner did tell me that his lower back has been awesome since he’s been squatting. I guess I can’t hide from squatting much longer if I want a healthy lower back. Dang it.

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FrankSobotka

Good stuff, I’ll try this today  

I lay on the ground and roll my forearms  and biceps with a barbell also, hurts like hell. I’m too cheap to buy one of those arm aid devices. 

Regarding foam rolling. I used to roll every night before bed and sometimes during the day. I haven’t done it in several years and I don’t feel any different. 

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MeatPlow

Chris Duffin sells some heavy duty rolling and active release tools. They are super expensive though. I've tried using a Kettlebell to roll certain areas out before but when you're doing it by yourself it can get difficult for sure. 

I'm going to give this one a whirl as a good preventive measure as I've suffered with tennis and golfers elbow quite a bit over the past several years. 

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Tommy J.
4 hours ago, MeatPlow said:

Chris Duffin sells some heavy duty rolling and active release tools. They are super expensive though. I've tried using a Kettlebell to roll certain areas out before but when you're doing it by yourself it can get difficult for sure. 

I'm going to give this one a whirl as a good preventive measure as I've suffered with tennis and golfers elbow quite a bit over the past several years. 

Man when Joe first told me about rolling the triceps for golfers elbow, my first thought was “wtf?..” but DAMN does it help! And since Jedder laced Joe up on that, thanks to Jedd as well!

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Adam Juncker

I have had no elbow issues for over a year now and I arm wrestle 3-4 times per month.  One of the things I do: I have a wrist roller mounted on the wall.  I roll a moderate amount weight up with flexion and then slowly release each rep on the descent.  Then I roll it up with extension and slowly release each rep.  On the descent, I make sure to use only one hand, keep my arms parallel to the floor, and stretch the flexors/extensors under the load of the weight.  I normally 3-4 sets 1 time per week, usually on the day after arm wrestling practice.  I think this is the principle behind the Therabar.  

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MeatPlow
6 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

Man when Joe first told me about rolling the triceps for golfers elbow, my first thought was “wtf?..” but DAMN does it help! And since Jedder laced Joe up on that, thanks to Jedd as well!

Joe and Adam Glass have been super helpful to me since my return to this board and grip training.

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MeatPlow
4 hours ago, Adam Juncker said:

I have had no elbow issues for over a year now and I arm wrestle 3-4 times per month.  One of the things I do: I have a wrist roller mounted on the wall.  I roll a moderate amount weight up with flexion and then slowly release each rep on the descent.  Then I roll it up with extension and slowly release each rep.  On the descent, I make sure to use only one hand, keep my arms parallel to the floor, and stretch the flexors/extensors under the load of the weight.  I normally 3-4 sets 1 time per week, usually on the day after arm wrestling practice.  I think this is the principle behind the Therabar.  

I used the blur therabar to help with my elbows. Its just sort of pain to do though. I never considered the mounted wrist roller. Outstanding idea and after one does that negative release they can do the rolling shown here.

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Blacksmith513

Foam rolling is great to do.. I for some reason tend to get muscle knots, probably because I'm such a tense person... Anyways, just laying on the area that hurts with my foam roller, I can feel the pain sorta just "release".  

Last week at work, I had to use a pick to break through some frozen dirt for like an hour to put a form for concrete. My right wrist hurt so bad for like 5 days after.. But rolling and massaging helped so much. 

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