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Bornintothe

Larry Wheels lifts the Inch Dumbbell

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Fist of Fury
31 minutes ago, Wannagrip said:

I am just waiting for Wheels to blow up a bodypart. Going waaaay too fast with way too many demos of strength for views on InstaGram and YouTube.  He won't stand the test of time by any means (my opinion). Consider this my prediction with a time stamp of 1/9/18

Well, if you're doing strongman at a high level it's almost a 100% guarantee you will tear something at some point. It doesn't matter who you are really.

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Wannagrip
5 minutes ago, Fist of Fury said:

Well, if you're doing strongman at a high level it's almost a 100% guarantee you will tear something at some point. It doesn't matter who you are really.

I am not talking Strongman here.  That is just icing on the cake.  You must not have seen what Larry has been doing over the last year?

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Aleksandar Milosevic
3 hours ago, Wannagrip said:

I am just waiting for Wheels to blow up a bodypart. Going waaaay too fast with way too many demos of strength for views on InstaGram and YouTube.  He won't stand the test of time by any means (my opinion). Consider this my prediction with a time stamp of 1/9/18

That's being conservative. In my opinion, Larry is going to die or have serious blood pressure and heart issues till his 35-40.

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Joseph Sullivan
3 hours ago, Wannagrip said:

I am just waiting for Wheels to blow up a bodypart. Going waaaay too fast with way too many demos of strength for views on InstaGram and YouTube.  He won't stand the test of time by any means (my opinion). Consider this my prediction with a time stamp of 1/9/18

100% agreed on that. Was thinking it myself.

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Fist of Fury
3 hours ago, Wannagrip said:

I am not talking Strongman here.  That is just icing on the cake.  You must not have seen what Larry has been doing over the last year?

I don't care what he has done. In this video he's doing strongman and that's why I commented on it.

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Rick Walker
11 hours ago, Wannagrip said:

I am just waiting for Wheels to blow up a bodypart. Going waaaay too fast with way too many demos of strength for views on InstaGram and YouTube.  He won't stand the test of time by any means (my opinion). Consider this my prediction with a time stamp of 1/9/18

It is 2019. The days of men caring about things such as health and attached tendons are over. This is the ME generation. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Today's super strength athlete/internet sensation would gladly go out in a blaze of glory at the ripe old age of 35 than live a mediocre/unknown life. It is all about the fame. And if you have been keeping track, they are kicking off left and right.

Live by the sword, die by the sword. I say good on him. Do it while he can, let the chips fall where they may. I always thought Stan Efferding was going to pop as well, and he is still here at 51, and still doing his thing. Same with Louie Simmons, Chuck Vogelpohl, Steve Goggins, and many others. They have all suffered injuries that would have left mortal men broken forever, and they keep coming back into the fight. 

I say as long as these guys don't have kids they are raising and influencing, or a wife they are leaving behind, then their life if their own. If they want to live hard, die young, and need the biggest coffin, then it is their right to do so. The rest of us can just watch in awe.

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Bornintothe

Larry is not the first to live the way he does and he won’t be the last. Like Rick said I think he is more concerned with being TBE and not the reprocussions. Obliviously he can’t keep this pace forever, but he can for now and I think that’s his view on it. Do what I can now.  

I think comparing him to Ronnie is fair. I would say his drive and passion are similar, but I think he is going at it a little smarter than Ronnie. Even if you just look at Ronnie’s lifting technique. Ronnie probably has the ugliest 800 pound squat I’ve ever seen. I look at this vid and I think, “No wonder this guy can’t walk anymore. He’s squatting 800 lbs. like he’s in a hack squat machine.”

 

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Stephen Ruby
14 hours ago, Wannagrip said:

I am just waiting for Wheels to blow up a bodypart. Going waaaay too fast with way too many demos of strength for views on InstaGram and YouTube.  He won't stand the test of time by any means (my opinion). Consider this my prediction with a time stamp of 1/9/18

He has mentioned that he is a genetic anomaly in the fact he has the ability to train the way he does without getting injured. He has actually mentioned wanting to go more into bodybuilding(the money is better) which if he does I don't see any major injuries happening for him. 

10 hours ago, Aleksandar Milosevic said:

That's being conservative. In my opinion, Larry is going to die or have serious blood pressure and heart issues till his 35-40.

Not all strongman die in the early 30's. One of the strongest men to ever live in bill kazmaier is still going strong in his mid 60's. Actually the only WSM champion who passed away early was Jon Pall Sigmarsson which was due to a heart defect. I would say that athletes who have the most health issues would be NFL football players or Boxers. I would imagine we will see that MMA fighters will begin to suffer serious health issues as well. Any sport with intense physical contact would be much more damaging to the body then lifting heavy weights. 

 

I'm a big fan of larry wheels he is very humble and from all accounts seems like a generally great guy. I would watch some of his videos where he talks about his life and where he came from if you want to get a better appreciation for the man.

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BigRedDoc
42 minutes ago, Stephen Ruby said:

Actually the only WSM champion who passed away early was Jon Pall Sigmarsson which was due to a heart defect. 

While true several other prominent strongmen have met early ends. OD Wilson (2nd at WSM), Jesse Marunde (2nd at WSM), and Mike Jenkins (Arnold Strongman Classic winner) come to mind. 

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Aleksandar Milosevic
4 hours ago, Stephen Ruby said:

He has mentioned that he is a genetic anomaly in the fact he has the ability to train the way he does without getting injured. He has actually mentioned wanting to go more into bodybuilding(the money is better) which if he does I don't see any major injuries happening for him. 

Not all strongman die in the early 30's. One of the strongest men to ever live in bill kazmaier is still going strong in his mid 60's. Actually the only WSM champion who passed away early was Jon Pall Sigmarsson which was due to a heart defect. I would say that athletes who have the most health issues would be NFL football players or Boxers. I would imagine we will see that MMA fighters will begin to suffer serious health issues as well. Any sport with intense physical contact would be much more damaging to the body then lifting heavy weights. 

 

I'm a big fan of larry wheels he is very humble and from all accounts seems like a generally great guy. I would watch some of his videos where he talks about his life and where he came from if you want to get a better appreciation for the man.

The activity is not the problem, 2+ grams of AAS per week for years on end is the problem. Larry isn't that tall, and that's a plus for health. Being very tall, very heavy, with a high blood pressure from activity and AAS is the wombo-combo for early death. Boxers usually don't have heart problems, since boxing is both aerobic and anaerobic. For NFL I don't really know, but both them and boxers have a lot of brain trauma and CTE issues, which are starting to manifest earlier and earlier in their careers.

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Wannagrip
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He has mentioned that he is a genetic anomaly in the fact he has the ability to train the way he does without getting injured. 

Oh he says this? This is pretty dumb of him to say if he said it.  He's like 24 and hardly has been in the game long. My prediction stands.

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Joseph Sullivan
5 hours ago, BigRedDoc said:

While true several other prominent strongmen have met early ends. OD Wilson (2nd at WSM), Jesse Marunde (2nd at WSM), and Mike Jenkins (Arnold Strongman Classic winner) come to mind. 

And don’t forget that big dude  John Perry. So young. Huge traps.

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Lucasraymond
On 1/8/2019 at 6:52 AM, Rick Walker said:

John Wood spoke many years ago of members of a college basketball team (I believe it was college, possibly Michigan) casually lifting the inch dumbbell at practice one day. Just strolling up to it and hoisting it. It is safe to assume if they are playing D1 college basketball, most of them are in excess of 6'3" or taller with huge hands.

Look at Shaq's hand on a men's basketball. It looks like me holding a softball. When your thumb can overlap your fingers on a handle, there is a good chance grip will not be an issue.

I would love to see the statistics of NBA players versus the inch dumbbell or NFL linemen and tightends versus the inch. With no training, many of them would hoist it no sweat. Rob Vigeant Jr. lifted one at my grip contest in 2003 and had never touched one before then. He was nicknamed "Monkey Paws" or something similar for a reason after that contest. His hands are HUGE.

Rick when Jedd and I were doing a grip contest at the Syracuse State Fair right next to us was a outdoor basketball court and there were some Harlem globetrotters (not them but similar) and the one guy was 6'11" and he did a hand length comparison to Jedd and it was >1" finger and thumb length compared to Jedds. We wanted him to try a rolling handle but he wouldn't; so I would definitely agree!!

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king crusher

Larry seems like a down to earth decent guy, I hope he sticks around. Every 23 year old  thinks they are invincible lol. 

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Alawadhi
23 hours ago, Aleksandar Milosevic said:

That's being conservative. In my opinion, Larry is going to die or have serious blood pressure and heart issues till his 35-40.

Let's hope it won't come to this.

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Rick Walker
10 hours ago, Aleksandar Milosevic said:

The activity is not the problem, 2+ grams of AAS per week for years on end is the problem. Larry isn't that tall, and that's a plus for health. Being very tall, very heavy, with a high blood pressure from activity and AAS is the wombo-combo for early death. Boxers usually don't have heart problems, since boxing is both aerobic and anaerobic. For NFL I don't really know, but both them and boxers have a lot of brain trauma and CTE issues, which are starting to manifest earlier and earlier in their careers.

Chuck Vogelpohl's "supplement use" is something that you only hear about in fairy tales. I once heard from a good source that there was a time, due to work and other commitments, that he could only train once or twice a week and was eating one or two meals a day at the most. To make due, he got some sort of implant in his calf that slowly released hormones into his body. I guess it was something that is typically used on beef cows to make them grow bigger, faster. He would come into the gym and squat, bench, and deadlift heavy all in the same workout, week after week, and not only did he not get injured, he got stronger...

If you do your research on AAS, the amount of deaths attributed to them are minimal at best. Aspirin kills more people every year then AAS. And, much like aspirin, some people have adverse reactions to small amounts of AAS and others can take enormous amounts and are still with us today (Dorian Yates, Ronnie Coleman, Jay Cutler, Lee Haney, Arnold, Franco, Phil Heath, Pudzianowski, etc.) This is also why many of these supermen lose a ton of weight once they are done competing.

Remember, it is not necessarily the AAS that is the issue. It is weighing 350 lbs. at 5'5". Even if it is all muscle, your heart is working double time to pump blood and thus you begin to see hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Rich Piana's heart weighed around 670 grams and Dallas Mcarver's weighed 833 grams. The normal man's heart is about 300 grams, for reference.

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Aleksandar Milosevic
18 minutes ago, Rick Walker said:

Chuck Vogelpohl's "supplement use" is something that you only hear about in fairy tales. I once heard from a good source that there was a time, due to work and other commitments, that he could only train once or twice a week and was eating one or two meals a day at the most. To make due, he got some sort of implant in his calf that slowly released hormones into his body. I guess it was something that is typically used on beef cows to make them grow bigger, faster. He would come into the gym and squat, bench, and deadlift heavy all in the same workout, week after week, and not only did he not get injured, he got stronger...

If you do your research on AAS, the amount of deaths attributed to them are minimal at best. Aspirin kills more people every year then AAS. And, much like aspirin, some people have adverse reactions to small amounts of AAS and others can take enormous amounts and are still with us today (Dorian Yates, Ronnie Coleman, Jay Cutler, Lee Haney, Arnold, Franco, Phil Heath, Pudzianowski, etc.) This is also why many of these supermen lose a ton of weight once they are done competing.

Remember, it is not necessarily the AAS that is the issue. It is weighing 350 lbs. at 5'5". Even if it is all muscle, your heart is working double time to pump blood and thus you begin to see hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Rich Piana's heart weighed around 670 grams and Dallas Mcarver's weighed 833 grams. The normal man's heart is about 300 grams, for reference.

Rick, thanks for the reply. I'm pretty well educated on the topic of AAS. The problems with AAS are mainly the high blood pressure + heart hypertrophy, that comes only with prolonged use. Having high BP for 10 years sets you up for all sorts of trouble. As a professional athlete, you have to stay at the top of your game for at least 10 years, so you kinda have to use it, since the competition is also using. And this is not even counting the enormous pressure of having tons and tons of volume weekly which spikes your BP even more while training. Boxer Lamont Peterson also had an implant like that, but in his buttock. Chuck is almost like Frankenstein, he broke his neck fighting Matt Dimel (Matt died at 33) in Westside and trained with a broken neck for 9 months and had a lot of serious injuries, so he's not really a good example. Just look at some earlier videos of Larry, when he talks about going 3+ grams per week when he was 17-19 and feeling like rats are eating his insides all day. You have Thor who's had a stroke and his lip is still drooping, and he's 30. Eddie Hall said that if he continued to live like when he was preparing for WSM that he would die in a couple of years. 

But I agree, some people are able to run it for years and stay healthy, at least to some extent. I just think that the guys who know more (and have more money) about the subject tend to plan their cycles with professional staff and do their blood work religiously, but there's a lot of pro athletes that know nothing about it, and they do some straight up stupid cycles with a lot of diminishing returns. Some Olympic athletes do that, you wouldn't believe it.

And Alawadhi, I hope Larry and every strength athlete stays healthy and happy for the rest of their lives, as I wish to every good person. Larry seems like a great guy.

I know that the forum doesn't like PED talk, but I think my post isn't that offensive to the rule, if it is, I apologize in advance.

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Hopefully

You can not even mention it I believe. You are absolutely breaking the rule. It is a very weird policy but that's how it is. 

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Joseph Sullivan
8 minutes ago, Aleksandar Milosevic said:

Rick, thanks for the reply. I'm pretty well educated on the topic of AAS. The problems with AAS are mainly the high blood pressure + heart hypertrophy, that comes only with prolonged use. Having high BP for 10 years sets you up for all sorts of trouble. As a professional athlete, you have to stay at the top of your game for at least 10 years, so you kinda have to use it, since the competition is also using. And this is not even counting the enormous pressure of having tons and tons of volume weekly which spikes your BP even more while training. Boxer Lamont Peterson also had an implant like that, but in his buttock. Chuck is almost like Frankenstein, he broke his neck fighting Matt Dimel (Matt died at 33) in Westside and trained with a broken neck for 9 months and had a lot of serious injuries, so he's not really a good example. Just look at some earlier videos of Larry, when he talks about going 3+ grams per week when he was 17-19 and feeling like rats are eating his insides all day. You have Thor who's had a stroke and his lip is still drooping, and he's 30. Eddie Hall said that if he continued to live like when he was preparing for WSM that he would die in a couple of years. 

But I agree, some people are able to run it for years and stay healthy, at least to some extent. I just think that the guys who know more (and have more money) about the subject tend to plan their cycles with professional staff and do their blood work religiously, but there's a lot of pro athletes that know nothing about it, and they do some straight up stupid cycles with a lot of diminishing returns. Some Olympic athletes do that, you wouldn't believe it.

And Alawadhi, I hope Larry and every strength athlete stays healthy and happy for the rest of their lives, as I wish to every good person. Larry seems like a great guy.

I know that the forum doesn't like PED talk, but I think my post isn't that offensive to the rule, if it is, I apologize in advance.

Thor had a stroke? That makes sense. I always wondered what was up with his mouth.

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Aleksandar Milosevic
7 minutes ago, Joseph Sullivan said:

Thor had a stroke? That makes sense. I always wondered what was up with his mouth.

They say it's Bell's palsy, but it's lasting way too long and it's not improving, so I'd say it might have been a small stroke. 

 

 

12 minutes ago, Hopefully said:

You can not even mention it I believe. You are absolutely breaking the rule. It is a very weird policy but that's how it is. 

If that's true, the admins are going to delete the post, I'm fine with it.

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king crusher

Hes supposedly had the bells palsy for over a year. It doesnt last that long. It was most likely a stroke and didn't want people to know.

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LAINE SNOOK
2 hours ago, Joseph Sullivan said:

Thor had a stroke? That makes sense. I always wondered what was up with his mouth.

I thought he had Bell's palsy?

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Joseph Sullivan
10 hours ago, LAINE SNOOK said:

I thought he had Bell's palsy?

The other guys saying it was a stroke, disguised as bells. I had no idea he had either, but noticed he makes some strange faces. Especially when putting in his mouth guard. 

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Anthony C.
17 hours ago, Rick Walker said:

 

If you do your research on AAS, the amount of deaths attributed to them are minimal at best. Aspirin kills more people every year then AAS.

I'm not arguing with your post, but I do think that there are more people taking aspirin than steroids, so this may not be a fantastic example.

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king crusher
2 minutes ago, Anthony C. said:

I'm not arguing with your post, but I do think that there are more people taking aspirin than steroids, so this may not be a fantastic example.

Exactly.  Otc meds are taken at a rate so much higher it's not worth even saying something like that. 

 

It's like saying more people die choking on cheerios than fighting a grizzly bear.  

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