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The best way to train the thumb for closing grippers


jackhammer922

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7 minutes ago, Chez said:

My routine has changed over the years. As my gripper sessions have gotten more intense and I use bigger grippers, I have needed more rest between sessions. I now only train grippers once every two weeks for each hand and I rotate the hands. so one week, left crush, next week right crush etc. Pinch is no problem with grippers and in fact I purposely put pinch the day before my right hand gripper session because I feel it primes my crush and gives me the best crush sessions if I do it the day before. I put thick bar as far apart from my right hand crush as possible.   

I do grippers on Wednesday in the middle of the week and the other stuff on Monday and Friday. My workout consists of one max set warmup with #2 up to 27 reps, 3 work sets with 2.5 up to 6 reps a set and finish with 3 for whatever I can do... all TNS. Pretty basic yet works for me. After that I play hammer man for a few sets and I’m done. 30 minutes tops for all. 

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Actually, I had said Warren was the guy who "basically invented the modern heavy grippers".  I guess "invention" was a poor word choice on my part.  Maybe I should have said, "re-introduction". Either

My typical pinch routine right now starts with 2hp on either the euro or flask but I have started with one hand pinch on each device as well. I normally then go to a wider pinch such as blobs or thick

Funny. I have been lurking on the thread while at work and skimming the conversation. I'll read through it tonight in detail and let you guys know my thoughts. I am big gripper nerd after all. bu

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Followed the chez up till the bending took over. Its simplistic approach is great for idiots like me. Conquered my filed 160 in no time thanks to it. The 167 not so much 🤷🏻‍♂️

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5 minutes ago, KapMan said:

Followed the chez up till the bending took over. Its simplistic approach is great for idiots like me. Conquered my filed 160 in no time thanks to it. The 167 not so much 🤷🏻‍♂️

You just needed more time. 

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Mike Rinderle

My homemade Poor Man's Pony Clamp TTK for under $5.

DIY Poor Man's TTK

I have this in my office and do 5x5s with it 2-3 days a week.  Have seen a huge increase in my thumb strength since I started.  I have some smaller clamps I use for dynamic key pinch as well.

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10 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

Edit: and to my knowledge, Yori is still the strongest bw to rated gripper closer? And even if his record has been broken, Yori's report card still proves you dont need a big thumb pad to close some impressive grippers.

It might be me.  Maybe I'm not familiar with Yori's numbers though.  I closed a 158 gripper at 145 body weight in one of Adam's contests. 

I don't have a "big" thumb pad either and definitely not a thick hand.  But I guess I can't understand the energy expenditure here to say that a thumb pad "doesn't matter" and you can just tip your wrist back and bring your thumb forward.  It's just not like that.  To get my gripper closes, including the MM1 (lightest to certify) I feel like I had to get every last thing I could out of my hands.  Including some thumb training so I had something to meet the gripper with. 

I agree with your point about Kinney.  I didn't slog away in the garage under my "NO CUSSIN" sign doing 50 sets of TTK with a battleship of weight on there until blood came out from under my nails.  I did finishers with my pony clamp, like 3 sets of 15.  I never really gained size, but my thumb pad is hard.  I can trap a gripper under it.  It has aided my closes for certain.   

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Wannagrip
6 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

Either way, i am glad this thread panned out like it did and i incidentally triggered you. You came off really cool the other day when you were shooting pm's. But now i see that your really just a bitch.

Take it off the board guys. We also don't name call here period.  Next time I take swift action.  And, yeah, I didn't see this as early as I should of in this thread.  We respect each other and each others opinions on the GripBoard.  When I have to pipe in and waste my time doing posts like this.....

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Wannagrip
6 hours ago, richcottrell said:

Like this post if you want one of the moderators to go through this thread and delete all the childlike posts that recently sidetracked what was otherwise a meaningful thread.
Personal attacks should not be acceptable, or did I mis something?

I would hate to see this thread get locked...

They are not. Please report such things in the future to me or another mod. Thanks.

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Alawadhi
16 hours ago, Chez said:

My routine has changed over the years. As my gripper sessions have gotten more intense and I use bigger grippers, I have needed more rest between sessions. I now only train grippers once every two weeks for each hand and I rotate the hands. so one week, left crush, next week right crush etc. Pinch is no problem with grippers and in fact I purposely put pinch the day before my right hand gripper session because I feel it primes my crush and gives me the best crush sessions if I do it the day before. I put thick bar as far apart from my right hand crush as possible.   

Wow Chez that's intense. 1 hand every two weeks on the crush. When you say pinch what do you mean? Two hand pinch? One hand? Thin pinch? Blobs? All?

16 hours ago, Chez said:

To give an example of how I have increased my rest for grippers over time I started by hitting grippers twice a week, then it moved to once a week, then it moved to once every 10 days and now its once every two weeks. I am constantly evaluating my routine and progress to see if changes are needed. If i'm on a roll, I don't change a thing. 

Yeah it's good to adapt your routine as you evolve your training. Of course it made you one of the best out there is grippers. Any plans certing on the #3.5?

16 hours ago, Joseph Sullivan said:

I do grippers on Wednesday in the middle of the week and the other stuff on Monday and Friday. My workout consists of one max set warmup with #2 up to 27 reps, 3 work sets with 2.5 up to 6 reps a set and finish with 3 for whatever I can do... all TNS. Pretty basic yet works for me. After that I play hammer man for a few sets and I’m done. 30 minutes tops for all. 

Dude, are you sure your not certified CoC #3? Damn man that's crazy high reps strong grippers all TNS. Just amazing.

15 hours ago, Mike Rinderle said:

My homemade Poor Man's Pony Clamp TTK for under $5.

DIY Poor Man's TTK

I have this in my office and do 5x5s with it 2-3 days a week.  Have seen a huge increase in my thumb strength since I started.  I have some smaller clamps I use for dynamic key pinch as well.

Nice. Easy and portable. You developed good thumb pads. But a question if you don't mind. Don't you think if you used your thumbs only you will even gain a bit more size in your thumbs? I mean there is little body push from your side. But if you used only thumbs it won't add more gains?

13 hours ago, Cannon said:

It might be me.  Maybe I'm not familiar with Yori's numbers though.  I closed a 158 gripper at 145 body weight in one of Adam's contests. 

I don't have a "big" thumb pad either and definitely not a thick hand.  But I guess I can't understand the energy expenditure here to say that a thumb pad "doesn't matter" and you can just tip your wrist back and bring your thumb forward.  It's just not like that.  To get my gripper closes, including the MM1 (lightest to certify) I feel like I had to get every last thing I could out of my hands.  Including some thumb training so I had something to meet the gripper with. 

I agree with your point about Kinney.  I didn't slog away in the garage under my "NO CUSSIN" sign doing 50 sets of TTK with a battleship of weight on there until blood came out from under my nails.  I did finishers with my pony clamp, like 3 sets of 15.  I never really gained size, but my thumb pad is hard.  I can trap a gripper under it.  It has aided my closes for certain.   

Firstly well done. I never knew that about you. Congrats! Second, I knew that about Kinney but I totally forgot about it. Who in his right mind will train until blood comes from under the nails? This will do much more harm than good. Another thing to add to Kinney's credibility. 

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Mike Rinderle

Good question Bader.  This one is a really hard clamp and I use it mainly for thumb strength in the static position for overall pinch strength.  I have some smaller, easier ones at home that I use for just thumb work.  

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2 hours ago, Alawadhi said:

Wow Chez that's intense. 1 hand every two weeks on the crush. When you say pinch what do you mean? Two hand pinch? One hand? Thin pinch? Blobs? All?

Yeah it's good to adapt your routine as you evolve your training. Of course it made you one of the best out there is grippers. Any plans certing on the #3.5?

Dude, are you sure your not certified CoC #3? Damn man that's crazy high reps strong grippers all TNS. Just amazing.

Nice. Easy and portable. You developed good thumb pads. But a question if you don't mind. Don't you think if you used your thumbs only you will even gain a bit more size in your thumbs? I mean there is little body push from your side. But if you used only thumbs it won't add more gains?

Firstly well done. I never knew that about you. Congrats! Second, I knew that about Kinney but I totally forgot about it. Who in his right mind will train until blood comes from under the nails? This will do much more harm than good. Another thing to add to Kinney's credibility. 

On the COC# 3 question, no not yet. I am not consistent enough with the number 3 to feel comfortable certifying. Maybe I will be good enough in April at the Viking Vice Grip challenge... but I don’t know. I do too many different things with grip. Maybe if I focused just on the COC for a while it would be an easy go... but I can’t just do grippers and scrap my other toys! Because as we all know Bader... I LOVE ALL that pertains to ZEE GRIP!

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Chipping in from the Netherlands...

Always like these discussions but most of the time it seems to come down to personal preferences and/or personal strong/weaks point because of genetics. As is the case now. So here are my personal experiences regarding the thumbpad/grippers/hand growth 'issue'.

1) Will griptraining grow your hands? Have been training grip for 6 years now. Mostly a well rounded approach with equal parts gripper, pinch, fatbar (and wrist training later on). I have tried high reps, low reps, high intensity, high volume etc. Have my hands gotten noticeable thicker in that time? Nope. Nor have my forearms for that matter. Do I think this would be the case for anyone doing my kind of grip training? Definitely not! Genetics differ hugely. Loads of people that are more muscular than me with less training, so why wouldn't that be true for the hands/forearms as well?

2) Does a bigger thumbpad help with gripper training? No idea, my hands are flat as f*ck.

3) Will dynamic pinch training thicken the thumbpad? Maybe, but only if you have the right genetics, all dynamic pinching ever got me was an injured thumb joint which took a loooong time to heal. So I wouldn't recommend it personally.

4) So what does help with closing bigger grippers? Still looking for that answer myself. Pretty sure after 6 years of experimenting that there is very little that has any carryover to grippers though (for me anyway). So just train grippers. I would however recommend adding wrist training (from all angles) to stay injury free! I figured that one out after numerous injuries unfortunately...

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4 hours ago, Alawadhi said:
21 hours ago, Chez said:

My routine has changed over the years. As my gripper sessions have gotten more intense and I use bigger grippers, I have needed more rest between sessions. I now only train grippers once every two weeks for each hand and I rotate the hands. so one week, left crush, next week right crush etc. Pinch is no problem with grippers and in fact I purposely put pinch the day before my right hand gripper session because I feel it primes my crush and gives me the best crush sessions if I do it the day before. I put thick bar as far apart from my right hand crush as possible.   

Wow Chez that's intense. 1 hand every two weeks on the crush. When you say pinch what do you mean? Two hand pinch? One hand? Thin pinch? Blobs? All?

21 hours ago, Chez said:

To give an example of how I have increased my rest for grippers over time I started by hitting grippers twice a week, then it moved to once a week, then it moved to once every 10 days and now its once every two weeks. I am constantly evaluating my routine and progress to see if changes are needed. If i'm on a roll, I don't change a thing. 

Yeah it's good to adapt your routine as you evolve your training. Of course it made you one of the best out there is grippers. Any plans certing on the #3.5?

My typical pinch routine right now starts with 2hp on either the euro or flask but I have started with one hand pinch on each device as well. I normally then go to a wider pinch such as blobs or thicker pinch blocks (4") and finish with another item normally found in medleys like the IM hub and some dynamic pinch with thumbscrews on a gripper. I have honestly never trained thin pinch but I want to start throwing that in since some of the top pinch guys highly recommend it. When a contest is announced that I wanted to attend, I specialized in those movements for the months leading up to it. For example, I specialized on the IM hub and Blockbuster leading up to the most recent competition since they were both events.

I definitely plan to certify on the coc #3.5 but I want the MM7 and 8 first. Its easier for me to focus on getting my MMS stronger and having that strength trickle down to my CCS. If I focus too much on CCS, I lose my MMS set strength and max closing power. Once I am at MM8 level, CCS on an average #3.5 shouldn't be pretty casual because it will feel so light. It works best for me this way. Focus on MMS and getting that strong so it trickles down to the wider sets.    

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Alawadhi
2 hours ago, Chez said:

My typical pinch routine right now starts with 2hp on either the euro or flask but I have started with one hand pinch on each device as well. I normally then go to a wider pinch such as blobs or thicker pinch blocks (4") and finish with another item normally found in medleys like the IM hub and some dynamic pinch with thumbscrews on a gripper. I have honestly never trained thin pinch but I want to start throwing that in since some of the top pinch guys highly recommend it. When a contest is announced that I wanted to attend, I specialized in those movements for the months leading up to it. For example, I specialized on the IM hub and Blockbuster leading up to the most recent competition since they were both events.

I definitely plan to certify on the coc #3.5 but I want the MM7 and 8 first. Its easier for me to focus on getting my MMS stronger and having that strength trickle down to my CCS. If I focus too much on CCS, I lose my MMS set strength and max closing power. Once I am at MM8 level, CCS on an average #3.5 shouldn't be pretty casual because it will feel so light. It works best for me this way. Focus on MMS and getting that strong so it trickles down to the wider sets.    

Thanks for the reply Chez. And good read.

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Mike Rinderle
12 minutes ago, Tommy J. said:

I remember for the longest you were the guy with the best bw close. Strong!

to answer your question on the energy thing, good point. But it takes 2 to tango. and an equal amount of energy both ways.

 

To the part highlighted. Yes it is. I will post richard sorins gripper technique vid shortly. While richard certainly had a very strong pinch, and thick hands, he states clearly in his technique vid that what creates the wall for the rear handle is the tipping back of the hand, and pushing the thumb forward.

 

and while im not a hater of Joe, he only said a few things in his vid i disagree with. One of them being the focus on the thumb pad for gripper work. To that i still say...

 

https://youtu.be/-K7fCQlUhj0

I'm with Tommy on this one.  I set the gripper high in my hand by cocking my wrist ala Richard Sorin.  If it is touching my thumb pad, it has slid too far back in my hand and I'm going to miss the close on anything hard.  

Where thumb strength can be valuable, IMHO, is for that last centimeter of the close when you hook your forefinger with the thumb and add the thumbs strength to the crush for that final little bit.  If I get good purchase on my forefinger with my thumb, it can make as much as a 10 lb difference in what I can close vs not getting my thumb really involved in the last part of the close.

Take it for what it's worth coming from me though.  I failed at the MM3 twice  :blush and the hardest gripper I ever closed with a block set in a competition was 169.9 lbs, so my best was way below what some of these beasts like Tommy and Chez can do.

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richcottrell
15 hours ago, Tommy J. said:

But just for the record, Warren didnt invent the hand gripper either. We can take it all the way back 100 years i guess if it makes our argument look cool. But the fact is, Joe was the guy responsible for claiming training the thumb pad was of any importance before people actually took note of it.

 

but i do appretiate your posting! That actually is goid stuff for those who may not know.

Actually, I had said Warren was the guy who "basically invented the modern heavy grippers".  I guess "invention" was a poor word choice on my part.  Maybe I should have said, "re-introduction". Either way, I thought Tetting was the guy responsible for first using truly "heavy duty" springs and in doing so transformed grippers from a fitness tool into a strength tool.   Warren Tetting is considered "The grandfather of modern grippers".

I am sorry to beat a dead horse.  I am guilty of making this become the famous Monty Python skit in the Argument Clinic as I really
 would like to just forget about Kinney, and learn about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.

I now kick that dead horse one last time anyway...
My apologies.
I would like to offer one more piece from my archive.
The  point I was trying to make with that last post with that historic info (as well as my one exchange with Warren), was this idea (or theory) of training the thumb for strength was not original to Kinney.  

Here is another earlier publication -- which also predates Kinney but is an IronMind product.  
John Brookfield's "Mastery of Hand Strength", first 
edition 1995.
page 16.
The Thumb
"As many of you have probably learned, strong thumbs are required for pinch lifting, as well as lifting thick handled dumbbells.  By building up your thumb strength you will also build your crushing strength.  The reason for this is because your whole hand works in unison."


It has been many years sense I first read that Brookfield book.  Looking back, it was my gateway drug into the world of grip!   I am not a super collector, but I know Brookfield used to write articles for Milo.  I think much of the content from those articles found their way into his two books.  I do remember this about John's books....  while he was the second CoC#3, he was NOT big a huge fan of only closing grippers.   Brookfield wanted strong hands in all directions and for any application and he  seemed stress the importance of "thumb strength" for all aspects of grip.

It might have been Kinney's popularity as the IronMind CoC posterboy that made whatever he said about "the thumb" to seem like it was gospel.   The point I was trying to make was there were other guys who came before him.  They were either talking about thumb strength as it pertains to crushing strength and/or grippers, or they were selling equipment to directly train the thumb or they were publishing training methods to improve thumb strength.   Remember the Kinney CoC3 cert was in 1997.  Brookfield did his in 1992.  Tetting started selling grippers in 1964, and his thumb training device in 1975.

Now there is the second part of this conversation and that is "Thumb Pad Size.  
This might truly have been Kinney who first said "Thumb pad size".  
While less controversial people were talking about "thumb strength" as it applies to grippers.... I do NOT know of "Thumb Pad Size" being talked about.

Forgetting about the Bigfoot history of Kinney, the question remains:
Is this training for increased thumb pad size possible? 
and/or
Is a big Thumb Pad  beneficial for grippers?


I am still new to this world of grip, and I will admit I am here because my base grip strength is equal to a wet fish!  I could not close my CoC1 when I first got it many years ago.

So, While things got a little carried away, there is some good stuff being talked about here, and some guys way up on the MM Ladder are offering there training techniques and opinions.
The title of this thread is "The best way to train the thumb for closing grippers".

Lets talk about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.
1) Do you even need  thumb strength for grippers?
2) Does a physically larger sized "thumb pad" help close the gripper or keep it better positioned for the close"
3) If the Thumb Pad size does help, is it actually possible to  train the thumb pad to make it bigger?
4) I know I am missing something here, I got too distracted looking in those old books...
when I should have tried to work-out a little before work!

thanks everyone
respectfully, 
Rich 

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11 minutes ago, richcottrell said:

Actually, I had said Warren was the guy who "basically invented the modern heavy grippers".  I guess "invention" was a poor word choice on my part.  Maybe I should have said, "re-introduction". Either way, I thought Tetting was the guy responsible for first using truly "heavy duty" springs and in doing so transformed grippers from a fitness tool into a strength tool.   Warren Tetting is considered "The grandfather of modern grippers".

I am sorry to beat a dead horse.  I am guilty of making this become the famous Monty Python skit in the Argument Clinic as I really
 would like to just forget about Kinney, and learn about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.

I now kick that dead horse one last time anyway...
My apologies.
I would like to offer one more piece from my archive.
The  point I was trying to make with that last post with that historic info (as well as my one exchange with Warren), was this idea (or theory) of training the thumb for strength was not original to Kinney.  

Here is another earlier publication -- which also predates Kinney but is an IronMind product.  
John Brookfield's "Mastery of Hand Strength", first 
edition 1995.
page 16.
The Thumb
"As many of you have probably learned, strong thumbs are required for pinch lifting, as well as lifting thick handled dumbbells.  By building up your thumb strength you will also build your crushing strength.  The reason for this is because your whole hand works in unison."


It has been many years sense I first read that Brookfield book.  Looking back, it was my gateway drug into the world of grip!   I am not a super collector, but I know Brookfield used to write articles for Milo.  I think much of the content from those articles found their way into his two books.  I do remember this about John's books....  while he was the second CoC#3, he was NOT big a huge fan of only closing grippers.   Brookfield wanted strong hands in all directions and for any application and he  seemed stress the importance of "thumb strength" for all aspects of grip.

It might have been Kinney's popularity as the IronMind CoC posterboy that made whatever he said about "the thumb" to seem like it was gospel.   The point I was trying to make was there were other guys who came before him.  They were either talking about thumb strength as it pertains to crushing strength and/or grippers, or they were selling equipment to directly train the thumb or they were publishing training methods to improve thumb strength.   Remember the Kinney CoC3 cert was in 1997.  Brookfield did his in 1992.  Tetting started selling grippers in 1964, and his thumb training device in 1975.

Now there is the second part of this conversation and that is "Thumb Pad Size.  
This might truly have been Kinney who first said "Thumb pad size".  
While less controversial people were talking about "thumb strength" as it applies to grippers.... I do NOT know of "Thumb Pad Size" being talked about.

Forgetting about the Bigfoot history of Kinney, the question remains:
Is this training for increased thumb pad size possible? 
and/or
Is a big Thumb Pad  beneficial for grippers?


I am still new to this world of grip, and I will admit I am here because my base grip strength is equal to a wet fish!  I could not close my CoC1 when I first got it many years ago.

So, While things got a little carried away, there is some good stuff being talked about here, and some guys way up on the MM Ladder are offering there training techniques and opinions.
The title of this thread is "The best way to train the thumb for closing grippers".

Lets talk about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.
1) Do you even need  thumb strength for grippers?
2) Does a physically larger sized "thumb pad" help close the gripper or keep it better positioned for the close"
3) If the Thumb Pad size does help, is it actually possible to  train the thumb pad to make it bigger?
4) I know I am missing something here, I got too distracted looking in those old books...
when I should have tried to work-out a little before work!

thanks everyone
respectfully, 
Rich 

Plus one on everything working as a unit. Only as strong as the weakest link in that kinetic chain.

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Alawadhi
31 minutes ago, richcottrell said:

Actually, I had said Warren was the guy who "basically invented the modern heavy grippers".  I guess "invention" was a poor word choice on my part.  Maybe I should have said, "re-introduction". Either way, I thought Tetting was the guy responsible for first using truly "heavy duty" springs and in doing so transformed grippers from a fitness tool into a strength tool.   Warren Tetting is considered "The grandfather of modern grippers".

I am sorry to beat a dead horse.  I am guilty of making this become the famous Monty Python skit in the Argument Clinic as I really
 would like to just forget about Kinney, and learn about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.

I now kick that dead horse one last time anyway...
My apologies.
I would like to offer one more piece from my archive.
The  point I was trying to make with that last post with that historic info (as well as my one exchange with Warren), was this idea (or theory) of training the thumb for strength was not original to Kinney.  

Here is another earlier publication -- which also predates Kinney but is an IronMind product.  
John Brookfield's "Mastery of Hand Strength", first 
edition 1995.
page 16.
The Thumb
"As many of you have probably learned, strong thumbs are required for pinch lifting, as well as lifting thick handled dumbbells.  By building up your thumb strength you will also build your crushing strength.  The reason for this is because your whole hand works in unison."


It has been many years sense I first read that Brookfield book.  Looking back, it was my gateway drug into the world of grip!   I am not a super collector, but I know Brookfield used to write articles for Milo.  I think much of the content from those articles found their way into his two books.  I do remember this about John's books....  while he was the second CoC#3, he was NOT big a huge fan of only closing grippers.   Brookfield wanted strong hands in all directions and for any application and he  seemed stress the importance of "thumb strength" for all aspects of grip.

It might have been Kinney's popularity as the IronMind CoC posterboy that made whatever he said about "the thumb" to seem like it was gospel.   The point I was trying to make was there were other guys who came before him.  They were either talking about thumb strength as it pertains to crushing strength and/or grippers, or they were selling equipment to directly train the thumb or they were publishing training methods to improve thumb strength.   Remember the Kinney CoC3 cert was in 1997.  Brookfield did his in 1992.  Tetting started selling grippers in 1964, and his thumb training device in 1975.

Now there is the second part of this conversation and that is "Thumb Pad Size.  
This might truly have been Kinney who first said "Thumb pad size".  
While less controversial people were talking about "thumb strength" as it applies to grippers.... I do NOT know of "Thumb Pad Size" being talked about.

Forgetting about the Bigfoot history of Kinney, the question remains:
Is this training for increased thumb pad size possible? 
and/or
Is a big Thumb Pad  beneficial for grippers?


I am still new to this world of grip, and I will admit I am here because my base grip strength is equal to a wet fish!  I could not close my CoC1 when I first got it many years ago.

So, While things got a little carried away, there is some good stuff being talked about here, and some guys way up on the MM Ladder are offering there training techniques and opinions.
The title of this thread is "The best way to train the thumb for closing grippers".

Lets talk about THUMB STRENGTH as it comes into use for grippers.
1) Do you even need  thumb strength for grippers?
2) Does a physically larger sized "thumb pad" help close the gripper or keep it better positioned for the close"
3) If the Thumb Pad size does help, is it actually possible to  train the thumb pad to make it bigger?
4) I know I am missing something here, I got too distracted looking in those old books...
when I should have tried to work-out a little before work!

thanks everyone
respectfully, 
Rich 

Excellent post Rich! Yes I do agree with every word here. Again and again and again we should repeat. Thumb strength can help the crush a lot. I made a video on how the thumb helps. Chez a 4 closer said pinch training was very beneficial to his crush and so on. As what my friends know about me, I don't train much because of personal issue like time and so on. But when I do, then I train blobs and two hand pinch. Never do crush expect to test. It got me to MMG2. If I do my training regularly then who knows MMG3+ with only pinch training? I already got so close on it. And my GE which is easy GE. My crush is up there with the likes of Jedd Johnson and Laine Snook (Laine a bit higher than us).

Of course training grippers is the best way to get best at grippers. But that doesn't mean pinch or thumb won't help. A strong, hard thumb pads helps make the hand wall even stronger.

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