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Squeezus

Chalking the Flask 101

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Squeezus

Hey guys, I had some folks ask me about the best way to chalk the flask, so I made a video. This is the same method that I use for chalking any implement that is not super rusty and rough already.

 

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John McCarter

Thanks for the mention in the video.

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Squeezus

 

9 minutes ago, John McCarter said:

Thanks for the mention in the video.

You bet, dude. You are the Chalkmaster.

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DAVE101

I wanted to expand on this subject Gil brought up when he posted this a while ago.

On 5/7/2016 at 3:10 PM, Squeezus said:

This is the same method that I use for chalking any implement that is not super rusty and rough already.

So what I don't understand is why others chalk (via the @John McCarter method shown here) implements that are rough or corroded. Wouldn't that just work material into the crevices making it smoother and harder to lift? In climbing sports, we brush excess chalk off of the rock/holds to bring the texture back to life. It's rare to see someone throw chalk on a hold (much less to grind some into it), doing this goes against everything I've known.

Now chalking a flask makes sense since aluminum is non porous, but why do it with something like a blob?

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wobbler

I have some blobs that are super slick, so same principle applies. When I'm super close to a new lift sometimes I'll dust it off with a nylon bristle brush, then slap it with a dry towel, and that does the trick.

Related note, rusty stuff can feel a little greasy to me. Good wipe down with a rag soaked in rubbing alcohol and then a fresh layer of chalk seems to help.

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DAVE101

Yes, I've actually gotten some block weights for the first time after a vinegar bath with zero chalk. A mild acid (such as vinegar) or alcohol can do wonders by themselves, and adding chalk immediately after has no benefit. It's only good for removing oil and moisture off your hands or the implements, but obviously with clean dry hands and implements there isn't any.

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climber511
Posted (edited)

Chalking is as much art as science it seems and experience really does matter.  Different surfaces do best with different preparation and amounts of chalk and seems to be fairly personal in what people find best.  About once a year I clean all my friction lift surfaces really well and start over.  No matter how clean your hands are when you lift - a certain amount of "hand grease" accumulates on surfaces and in the chalk buildup.  It's a pain in the butt to have to rechalk everything but its also a great learning experience as to how much chalk gives the best results.  I do this in the summer so that by Gripmas I have good working surfaces back on everything.  I also clean my hands really really well before doing any friction lift.

Edited by climber511
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DAVE101

Is there anyone here that chalks a knurled barbell? That's the quintessential example of what NOT to chalk.

@Squeezus do you have any input for chalking items that are textured, powder-coated, or corroded?

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climber511
45 minutes ago, DAVE101 said:

Is there anyone here that chalks a knurled barbell? That's the quintessential example of what NOT to chalk.

@Squeezus do you have any input for chalking items that are textured, powder-coated, or corroded?

Don't use too much chalk - these items will hold a lot of chalk easily and then the heavy layer of chalk can "break loose" and then slip upon itself.  I just use a chalk ball for this type item.

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Lucasraymond

When chalking there is definitely a "science" to it and understanding/feeling whether a surface is past is optimal texture and you need to restart or there needs to be more chalk applied to create more texture. As for a blob there is specific area (thumb lock area) is is more important than others and you can create an increased texture in that are despite the surface being naturally porous. It is all about feel when it comes to chalking. There are lifts that I may not necessarily be the strongest but I will optimize the texture as much as possible to outlift "stronger" lifters that do not optimize it. 

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Squeezus
9 hours ago, DAVE101 said:

Is there anyone here that chalks a knurled barbell? That's the quintessential example of what NOT to chalk.

@Squeezus do you have any input for chalking items that are textured, powder-coated, or corroded?

The other guys have pretty good advice here. The chalking technique for slick powder-coated or painted surfaces would be similar to the flask, but it takes longer since they won't accept chalk as readily. For textured or corroded surfaces, very light chalking to absorb oils and moisture in the hand and device is usually sufficient. I like to smack the loose chalk off the device and my hands in either case.

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