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How would you like to see GripSport grow?


richcottrell

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climber511

As usual there are (at least) a couple different sides.  On one hand we have those people for whom competition and their personal results trump having a longer competition experience with less readily available equipment that allows the best of their potential and don’t care about some of the time factors, expense, etc.  On the other we have those who are not as serious about the absolute maximum of their potential but want a short contest experience and while they care about their results – it’s not in the same way as others.  Both sides want more people involved but see the way forward in different ways.  The whole thing is starting to remind me of the old days when Power Lifting was splitting up due to differences they could not resolve – the real rattlesnake in the room and the one thing I definitely do not want to see happen here. 

 

As I see things we may have to have a two tier system of competition – one for those in a hurry so to speak and another for those for whom this is some really serious stuff for which they are willing to put up with things if that allows them to lift one pound more or move up the list one notch.  Kind of a “feeder” system where you go “try out the sport” at a contest that should last just a few hours at most and for which specialized training choices and deep knowledge about getting the best from a piece of equipment is unnecessary – this lets a new person get their feet wet and see if they like Grip as a Sport.  If they like it they now can choose to get specific equipment and do specialized training and move on to the other side where a contest may last 6+ hours or so and is one level so to speak away from a Nationals type environment.  As usual we will have those who choose to do both, which is also fine.  

 

Personally I would have no interest in driving 8 or 9 hours to do a 2 hour comp but this may just be the way to “Grow the Sport” as it will no doubt appeal to the average gym rat, climber, mechanic etc much more than the current system. 

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@Mikael Siversson, this thread is about growing Gripsport. Yet, in 7 posts, you have not managed to make a single suggestion, aside from "ask the Finns". If you have anything to add aside from attacki

This is my 2 cents or how American people says it.    I have wide circle of friends including Finland's elite class pro powerlifters, strongmen and arm wrestlers. I practise with them and I

Trigger Warning: I feel passionately about the future of gripsport, so brace yourself for a lot of opinions that may go against the grain. I think a good mix of competitions with cash prizes as wel

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canthar

I definitely agree with that. I don't see any reason for regional championships, Nat's and known big comps to be short. Short comps are great for low level introduction non-qualifier events and just fun gatherings to practice and try stuff out.

 

Definitely do not want to see a fracturing, would do nothing but hurt the sport.

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patrickmeniru

As a preface I have to admit that I only read the first 10 odd posts, and so if what I say below has already been discussed I can only apologise for the duplication.

Whilst I haven't put a great deal of thought into the growth of gripsport specifically, an observation is that 'functional strength' (whatever that actually means) is growing massively as a movement helped by crossfit and similar 'movement culture' type training methodologies.  More and more people are being exposed to movements that previously only athletes and those who the average person would consider hardcore strength/fitness enthusiasts performed like deadlifting, olympic movements and a plethora of movements that involve hanging from a bar/rings - which are more likely to be grip limited than movements involving machines and light dumbells that I typically associate with the majority of commercial gym-goers.

As more people do such exercises the need for a strong and durable grip becomes more evident to more people, and further (and perhaps more importantly) more people gain an aesthetic appreciation of the sport. (What I mean by that is that although watching someone close a gripper may not be intrinsically interesting, if you pass a #3 or whatever around a group of people who can barely budge it, then those same people would likely be much more interested to see someone get those handles to touch than they would be having never tried the gripper themselves - because they have more of an understanding of what's required).  Further, when people see the Klokovs of this world utilising some thickbar type training, it can only help to encourage wider participation in grip specific training but also to give people an understanding of just how strong some of the elite grip athletes are.

I suspect that one avenue of growth for grip sport is to piggyback on the success of crossfit and similar movements - as more people realise how beneficial grip training is to their primary activity, I would expect wider participation in grip training, and naturally those who enjoy the training (and who have an aptitude for it) are likely to look for ways to meet and compete with others in grip specifically - to that end the great work done in our community already in terms of articles on various strength sites, organising competitions etc. is invaluable, the more content about grip that gets out there in the form of articles and on social media, the better - I got into grippers after reading a Jim Bathurst article on one arm chin ups where CoC was mentioned as a footnote, I'm sure that similar mentions on more widely read articles would help, and as mentioned above I think that crossfit is one good avenue to explore.

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Lucasraymond
15 minutes ago, climber511 said:

As usual there are (at least) a couple different sides.  On one hand we have those people for whom competition and their personal results trump having a longer competition experience with less readily available equipment that allows the best of their potential and don’t care about some of the time factors, expense, etc.  On the other we have those who are not as serious about the absolute maximum of their potential but want a short contest experience and while they care about their results – it’s not in the same way as others.  Both sides want more people involved but see the way forward in different ways.  The whole thing is starting to remind me of the old days when Power Lifting was splitting up due to differences they could not resolve – the real rattlesnake in the room and the one thing I definitely do not want to see happen here. 

 

 

 

As I see things we may have to have a two tier system of competition – one for those in a hurry so to speak and another for those for whom this is some really serious stuff for which they are willing to put up with things if that allows them to lift one pound more or move up the list one notch.  Kind of a “feeder” system where you go “try out the sport” at a contest that should last just a few hours at most and for which specialized training choices and deep knowledge about getting the best from a piece of equipment is unnecessary – this lets a new person get their feet wet and see if they like Grip as a Sport.  If they like it they now can choose to get specific equipment and do specialized training and move on to the other side where a contest may last 6+ hours or so and is one level so to speak away from a Nationals type environment.  As usual we will have those who choose to do both, which is also fine.  

 

 

 

Personally I would have no interest in driving 8 or 9 hours to do a 2 hour comp but this may just be the way to “Grow the Sport” as it will no doubt appeal to the average gym rat, climber, mechanic etc much more than the current system. 

 

Which I really liked what Gil did at the Southern Squeeze, there were a few seasoned gripster but also a bunch of newbies which it is nice to see them compete. But how many of them have stuck with training since the contest?

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Jared Goguen
17 minutes ago, Lucasraymond said:

Which I really liked what Gil did at the Southern Squeeze, there were a few seasoned gripster but also a bunch of newbies which it is nice to see them compete. But how many of them have stuck with training since the contest?

That would be a really easy question to answer I think. Since like 90% of the people that went were on the facebook group some follow up questions could be asked.

Edit: Tim Fox is a good example, he was a beast at that comp, I believe that was his first comp as well and since then he has trained more grip to aid him in his strongman events from what I can tell from facebook.

Edited by Jared Goguen
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Wannagrip
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 There are so many sports out there that could benefit from grip training if it was cheap and easy for them to do.

This is key IMO.  Grip training IS HUGE with respect to sports performance and a diamond in the rough if you ask me.  To grow the sport, we need to attack this angle.

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canthar
5 minutes ago, Wannagrip said:

This is key IMO.  Grip training IS HUGE with respect to sports performance and a diamond in the rough if you ask me.  To grow the sport, we need to attack this angle.

It is the best place to start. Every single person I have done grip work with has been for this very reason. 

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Eric Roussin

In my experience, those who tend to get into grip sport -- those who actually compete in grip sport contests -- are people who already have strong hands. A number of climbers and armwrestlers compete in my contests. They were exposed to grip, realized they had a knack for it, and saw that it was fun to compete.

Those whose hands are a relative weakness in the activities they pursue may be interested in obtaining a stronger grip, and may do some grip training, but they won't typically be the people who get into grip sport.

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MCrushetta
2 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

One thing that will not work if you want to spread the sport is to, indirectly, have a go at the leading figures in grip. Your hubby produced a video in which he gave an example of his friends finding the 2HP Euro device so boring to watch they fell asleep. That may have been the case but does that really help unifying the grip sport? David Horne, who invented the Euro device, has absolute support in the UK grip sport community and he is also strongly supported by the Finns who use most of his grip 'toys'. It's a bit of an insult as David put a lot of thought into the device in order to make it as fair as possible.

Rather than worry too much about implements that may appear 'intimidating' to newbies why not ask the Finns how they are succeeding? Grip sport is, by a huge margin, more popular in Finland than anywhere else and they often use the Euro pinch device so its clearly not there the problem lies.

1 - Not sure who was 'having a go' at the leading figures. I missed that part.

2 - I don't have a 'hubby' but Gil is pretty cool. I didn't know the video he made was relevant to this thread either, but our friends did get sleep :-)

3 - I hope all the Finns chime in, and it's amazing how popular grip has gotten there. They are doing something right!

4 - I am worried about intimidating newbies with implements and negativity. Hoping to keep it super positive when I'm spreading the grip gospel.

5 - The ego is a nasty thing when left unchecked. I hope this thread continues to be productive instead of making us all look like we are a good old boys club sport that can't stay on task. 

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John McCarter

Here's my 2 cents.

For contest, why not have an "Amateur League" and "Professional League". In the "Amateur" contest, people could use whatever grip implements they wanted but no records could be set. In the "Professional" contest, people would use fixed implements, records could be contested.

 

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anwnate
1 hour ago, climber511 said:

As usual there are (at least) a couple different sides.  On one hand we have those people for whom competition and their personal results trump having a longer competition experience with less readily available equipment that allows the best of their potential and don’t care about some of the time factors, expense, etc.  On the other we have those who are not as serious about the absolute maximum of their potential but want a short contest experience and while they care about their results – it’s not in the same way as others.  Both sides want more people involved but see the way forward in different ways.  The whole thing is starting to remind me of the old days when Power Lifting was splitting up due to differences they could not resolve – the real rattlesnake in the room and the one thing I definitely do not want to see happen here. 

 

@climber511   I have the maximum respect for you but want to address a few things you said here.  Unless you are specifically referring to the "hand size neutrality" of the Euro, I don't know why gripsters would be "not as serious," and how they don't "care about their results" "in the same way as others."

As opposed to seriously responding to the issue of texture differences among Euros, it was pointed out that an Elite 2HPer Bob Sundin had a poor performance the first time he attempted "The Flask."  

Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, Euro's vary...a lot......we might as well just say so.  To say any differently is to bury one's head in the sand.

The Ironmind Rolling Thunder is no longer acknowledged by North American Grip Sport Organization...because it varies...a lot.  Documented cases of someone lifting 20lbs+ more on one than the other and the same exact argument can be made with the Euro.  I have little doubt that Jedd's, David's and your own Euro are probably the best "seasoned" Euro's out there.  How many other "World Records" have been pulled on other Euro's?  The fact that that words like seasoned are used...mean that the original implement has changed from what it was...to something different.

 

As I see things we may have to have a two tier system of competition – one for those in a hurry so to speak and another for those for whom this is some really serious stuff for which they are willing to put up with things if that allows them to lift one pound more or move up the list one notch.  Kind of a “feeder” system where you go “try out the sport” at a contest that should last just a few hours at most and for which specialized training choices and deep knowledge about getting the best from a piece of equipment is unnecessary – this lets a new person get their feet wet and see if they like Grip as a Sport.  If they like it they now can choose to get specific equipment and do specialized training and move on to the other side where a contest may last 6+ hours or so and is one level so to speak away from a Nationals type environment.  As usual we will have those who choose to do both, which is also fine.

I believe that we essentially have that two tiered system you speak of...but not for the reasons you speak of.  Additionally, I'm confused about the idea that you struggle to gain a single lb, unless you actually compete on the very same equipment you train on.  For the most part in the U.S. the Euro is competed on at NAGSC and Gripmas.  Occasionally one other time during the year?  The rest of the contests use a variety of implements...with David Horne, Iron Mind and FBBC...god knows there are a ton of them.  Newbies seldom qualify for NAGSC...so the separation is pretty keen.  I can't agree that implements other than the Euro don't require specialized training.

 

Personally I would have no interest in driving 8 or 9 hours to do a 2 hour comp but this may just be the way to “Grow the Sport” as it will no doubt appeal to the average gym rat, climber, mechanic etc much more than the current system. 

 

This is something I actually struggled with before deciding to have a "sanctioned" contest.  Many people here remember "The Old Days" fondly, where camaraderie and fun were a priority along with serious grip challenges.  In the last 2 years, I hosted something that was strictly about enjoying the moment, but there was a request for a bit more structure to it.  So, I decided on the minimum 3 event contest (no medley) followed by a BBQ, followed by a medley/RT farmers walk, followed by Bending and General fun and challenges.  With a possible 25 contestants at the moment, I'll be shocked if we can get through the "sanctioned" contest in less than 4 hours.  By then, we will all have worked up a hunger and will be enjoying an awesome lunch the wifey is making.  At this point...people who simply wished to attend a contest can skiddaddle and the others (probably the majority I'm hearing) will stay for the remaining festivities.  I can assure you...that if you were to drive the 7 hours to attend this contest...you wouldn't feel gypped in the least.

 

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climber511

The ability to use one’s personal best width is simply the single most important aspect in the 2 or 1 hand pinch event - to me anyway. 

 

“In the same way” above means going through the long and involved process of width and pressures to determine what is best for you – on a fixed width (be it aluminum or steel, wood, glass or whatever) the variable that matters the most to me on squeezing out every last pound does not exist.  It’s not that people won’t take the Flask seriously but that the implement is a fixed size (and a considerably wider width than is popular in the Euro comps I have held or read about).  The Axle already favors a certain handsize (big) – it’s just my feeling that the pinch should not favor anyone in that manner if it is avoidable.

 

I don’t care what material we use – unless we use a smooth hard chrome or similar surface – over time and use the surface is going to change – Aluminum as much as steel I think.  I have lifted on several different Euros (at least 8 or 9) – and the seasoning has never mattered as much as the width to me – others may be different of course.  I’m sure that given a Flask to work with I would figure out ways to lift more than when I started with it but I do not think I would reach the same results as on something adjustable - steel or aluminum.

 

My personal Euro has never been used at Gripmas but it is not seasoned (and won’t be) and quite smooth – it has a light sort of gold colored industrial chrome on it to prevent the rust that I was constantly fighting in my garage.  I have lifted more on it and Andrew Durniant's (when it was fairly new) than on Jedd’s which is more seasoned to the touch but on which I lift less weight consistently.  I have had Jedd, Kody and many others lift on mine and do essentially the same weights.  I used to think seasoning was a bigger deal than I do these days.  Of course it matters but not as much as the width in my opinion unless it is quite new and doesn't hold chalk well yet.  Give me an adjustable aluminum setup and I’d be just as happy I imagine given time. 

The Euro is (or can be) a very complex lift.  I well remember Kody coming to visit and leaving with a 40# or so PR in just a couple hours or technique work.  Personally I like that aspect of things but many don't obviously. 

The one thing we can always depend on is change - and I'm OK with growing the sport in about any way we can.  Well except for watering down the fairness of what we compete in.  Anyone who believes a fixed width is "fair" has simply not worked enough with learning their personal width and how to take advantage of it to see the difference it can make.  But I have moved beyond the "how to grow the sport" idea and will shut up now.

Not sure why this came out red - I must have clicked something I didn't know about :)

 

 

Edited by climber511
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Shoggoth

@climber511 I know Parris (Rico) keeps his Euro very clean and pulls decent numbers as well. 

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anwnate

Thanks for taking the time Chris.  I know that you have worked hard (successfully) at understanding the dynamics involved in generating the best lifts for the implement.

Myself, I've experienced large variance between Jedds setup and others, but it's possible that my technique is so poor that random factors are at work.

 I'd like to have the best of both worlds...the texture consistency, cost, ease and speed of a light portable loading pin implement...and also the handsize neutral, technique driven implement.  Until that combination appears, im willing to sacrifice the hand width issue for the benefits of the flask.

The fact is that the Axle favors not only larger handed individuals(as you spoke of) but is also a full bodied movement...which is much less a test of grip than it is of technique and back strength(and overall strength).  The odd thing about that...is that there has never been a serious movement to change the thickbar feat at Nationals to the Horne ATB...which addresses both issues.  Grippers are inherently unfair with the wider sets for smaller handed individuals. Could there not be an accurate dyanometer event?  I realize that these arguments stray from a direct answer to the posed question.

 Basically, I see the sport itself as somewhat compromised to begin with, and wonder why the line is being drawn on the Pinch.  

As it stands, with Aaron's (even more expensive?) setup as a possible exception, the Euro event isn't entry level friendly, from the mastering, to the cost, to the youth and women's divisions and ease of use in the contest setting.  

I'm gonna step off the thread now but want to say that I think it was an excellent topic to touch upon...and continue to.

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Mikael Siversson
On ‎4‎/‎05‎/‎2016 at 0:06 AM, Lucasraymond said:

I agree and disagree with you Mikael in some ways....the Euro I love as I think it is appropriate for the elite level gripsters due to the optimal width but I can totally see how the time consuming aspect is the problem. I love spending 5-6 hours at a grip contest but then again I devote the day to the contest others are not so committed. The time consuming part in that event comes more from people not knowing their appropriate width (which if you are new to it we should just give them a set width (48 or 54mm) just to start on but having the other implements available is good for the growth of the sport.

 

My experience is that people who compete for the first time don't care too much about width. At the 2012 West Australian championship even my then 13 yo daughter pinched at 64mm! I agree with Chris that width makes more of a difference to me than texture. Unlike most however I suck at narrow widths (anything below 60 mm is 'narrow' in my book). The 2HP is also not that time consuming imo so I don't understand all these references to this event alone taking several hours. It can be pretty quick if you have two set ups (one for warm up), rising bar system and run through it width by width (eg first everyone at 52mm). Meanwhile those at the next width can warm up on the second implement. The one thing that really slow things down (not only in the pinch) is if the guy/s changing the weights struggle with basic maths. Some simply need a calculator.

Overall I also agree however that a fixed width can be great for new people so they don't get confused (in 'entry level' competitions). As Chris and others stated the Euro is more of an implement for elite pinch lifters who are dead serious about reaching their potential and see how it compares with that of others when no hand size excuses can obscure the final outcome.

Edited by Mikael Siversson
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JHenze646

"At the smaller GripSort comps, like the ones I have been to so far, they seem to be more about the camaraderie of getting together.  There you can learn new things and meet other grip enthusiasts."

"I love spending 5-6 hours at a grip contest but then again I devote the day to the contest others are not so committed."

First off I apologize for not properly quoting the above statements but I am using the mobile version of the site. Yeah, I have no idea how technology works. That being said, please remember this is the internet. You can only assume someone's tone and delivery.

Regarding the standardizing of gripsport, there are other niche sports like strongman and highland games that have varying equipment and "adjustable" events that are quite successful. At one point, and probably still, the 2hp on the euro device was the most widely contested event in gripsport. If anything it is the standard for gripsport. Most gripsport events are now based on how the euro is contested. While it has the drawback of being time-consuming, there should be more of an argument for its adaptation and innovation and not its replacement. The technical aspect of the euro is not a negative whatsoever. As an athletic competitor, you should have to learn your sport and put forth the effort to master it.

High quality, affordable equipment will go a long way in introducing more athletes to gripsport and there are many new and enstablished companies right now doing just that. This is exciting.

Money in anything is a double edged sword. It may bring much needed growth but it may also bring a "win-at-all-costs" mentality.

I am not a very competitive person. I mainly attend gripsport competitions to see friends, old and new(and some I didn't yet know were old friends), see some amazing gyms, and try to better myself at an enjoyable sporting endeavor. I enjoy the camaraderie and the passion of the people involved. The quality of the people involved is like in nothing else and I hope however gripsport grows it never loses this.

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KapMan
On 5/4/2016 at 9:04 AM, Mikael Siversson said:

I knew this was going to be yet another "I hate the Euro pinch" thread. Although you will never admit it, I think the name alone annoys more than a few of you (we can always call it the 'Americano'). It must feel depressing every time we have a voting on the most prestigious grip event and the Euro 2HP comes out on top every time. David Horne did a great job inventing the implement and if you don't like it then simply avoid competitions in which it is featured and don't use it in competitions organised by you and your buddies. However don't expect everyone else to join you in celebration of the latest invention by someone that may or may not hang around in the long run.

Why not try getting stronger in the pinch rather than just admitting defeat, which is effectively what you are doing.

I also suspect many here don't care too much about other people, marginally interested in grip sport, getting a stronger grip but enjoy the game of not only getting as strong as possible but preferably also beating every one else (at least in their weight class) in the process. Competing against people with a lukewarm interest in grip is boring anyway.

Almost every time I see you post it's you shitting on someones idea, or thought. Why can't you just take into consideration what's being said. The Euro is a great device, if you have 45 hours to adjust for each persons sweet spot plus added and removing weight,and over 225 bucks for 2 sheets of round metal and inserts, the user then has to provide his or her own collars and pipe for the weights. That really just turns most people off. Kinda why not very many people have that device and more have pinch blocks as various widths made of wood. Not sure why you can't understand that in order to grow in the sport you have to be better at sharing ideas, thoughts and consider everyone. Based on your logic, why have any static sized devices in the sport at all? Then you would just have a smaller selection of implements less cool feats and less interest, congrats gripsport goes the way of the dinosaurs before it even has a chance to grow. You have this elitist attitude about you  that really curdles my body fat..

Back on topic..

As John mentioned, why not have a duel division set up(provided enough people show up). How North American Strongman(NAS) and United States Strongman(USS) have done it, there is a novice division and an open division. Novice messes with the same implements and has the same rules as open, only difference is the weight and the weight classes.  If you win or place top 3 in your division as a novice you're expected to move to open and stay there. If there is even more folk 45 or older you can set up a masters division.

I don't see gripsport ever getting to the point that crossfit and strongman are. Most people genuinely don't give a shit, and its not cool enough. I love grip sport, I'm competitive and its much safer on my body then Strongman or crossfit will ever be. I think what a person can do with their hands and forearms in this sport is nothing short of amazing. I get very few interest from others as it relates to the improvement of grip, granted I may not have decades messing around or umpteen records and trophies but I've learned enough pass on some advice. But this is a niche thing, with niche equipment that's priced as such. It is what it is. I i would love to see the sport get to the point that 30-40 people a contest starts happening. I like the smaller groups vs strongman and powerlifting in which you have 50-200+ people and all the logistics that with that. Got some behind the scenes insight into a 150+ strongman show here in NC, booooy its some nastiness.

Edited by KapMan
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canthar

Kap don't get me started on what strongman has become. I got involved in that almost 16years ago from and worked with novices to pro's. I do NOT want to see grip sport end up like that. 

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Mikael Siversson
21 minutes ago, KapMan said:

Almost every time I see you post it's you shitting on someones idea, or thought. Why can't you just take into consideration what's being said. The Euro is a great device, if you have 45 hours to adjust for each persons sweet spot plus added and removing weight,and over 225 bucks for 2 sheets of round metal and inserts, the user then has to provide his or her own collars and pipe for the weights. That really just turns most people off. Kinda why not very many people have that device and more have pinch blocks as various widths made of wood. Not sure why you can't understand that in order to grow in the sport you have to be better at sharing ideas, thoughts and consider everyone. Based on your logic, why have any static sized devices in the sport at all? Then you would just have a smaller selection of implements less cool feats and less interest, congrats gripsport goes the way of the dinosaurs before it even has a chance to grow. You have this elitist attitude about you  that really curdles my body fat..

 

I am only 'shitting' on bad ideas. For all its 'faults' have you ever wondered why it is regarded as THE grip competition event amongst just about all elite level competitors? If it takes you 45 hours to adjust a Euro set up then I think it is fair to say that you are doing something wrong. At the end of the day preferred events for elite level competitions will be decided by the organisers which, for these types of competitions, tend to be elite level grip athletes themselves.  If you don't like this particular implement then simply don't use it and avoid competitions in which it is featured, problem solved!

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canthar

There cannot be growth if the only talk and reference is about elite level lifters. 

 

Also ideas are just that ideas. No idea is bad. Treating someone's ideas as such will only prevent them from sharing ideas again and creates an atmosphere of exclusion. That does not mean all ideas are feasible, practical and will help growth. We have to try and think of all levels here. Not just elite and not just entry level novices. 

Edited by canthar
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Mikael Siversson

The underlying reason for this 'debate' is the promotion (in a different part of the GB) of a particular implement for the pinch, the so called 'flask'. It was promoted by first stating all the 'faults' of the most popular pinch implement (by elite level grip athletes). Herein lies the problem. If you take a piss on someone else's invention as part of promoting your own then don't be surprised to get a reaction. It would have been much better if the 'flask' had been promoted without badmouthing other people's (in this case David Horne) equipment.

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Tom Scibelli

The euro was never bad mouthed, an idea was thought of on how to make a pinch event where some of the draw backs of the euro could be minimized

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KapMan
39 minutes ago, Mikael Siversson said:

I am only 'shitting' on bad ideas. For all its 'faults' have you ever wondered why it is regarded as THE grip competition event amongst just about all elite level competitors? If it takes you 45 hours to adjust a Euro set up then I think it is fair to say that you are doing something wrong. At the end of the day preferred events for elite level competitions will be decided by the organisers which, for these types of competitions, tend to be elite level grip athletes themselves.  If you don't like this particular implement then simply don't use it and avoid competitions in which it is featured, problem solved!

I don't like the euro by design. I could give 0 (bad word filter)s about width, like some of you elitist seem to. I'll pinch any width in contest to the best of my ability. If I need to train specific widths, wood is cheap. It's really that simple. Eventually it seems like I will need to maybe get the euro. But in all honesty I see no need for it as I train for many common widths as anyone really should IMO. If you can't handle a specific width, then you are not as strong as you claim to be if you need your sweet spot to win. That's why I like fixed width devices, no one has a sweet spot. I may not have elite status so it's obvious to me that my opinion isn't valued. Everyone thought the RT was the end all be all rotating handle, then along came the crusher and similar rotating handles that were not only better constructed but offered different diameters for a more dynamic way to do the same thing.  The flask was never meant to replace anything and that was even stated in that thread. It was explained thoroughly its purpose and why it was developed, guess you missed that part.

Edited by KapMan
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KapMan
32 minutes ago, canthar said:

There cannot be growth if the only talk and reference is about elite level lifters. 

 

Also ideas are just that ideas. No idea is bad. Treating someone's ideas as such will only prevent them from sharing ideas again and creates an atmosphere of exclusion. That does not mean all ideas are feasible, practical and will help growth. We have to try and think of all levels here. Not just elite and not just entry level novices. 

Couldn't agree more, but lets ask the finns to be sure its ok..

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climber511

I made the "Climber Pinch" - a non adjustable fixed width pinch implement nearly 10 years ago - it has been in many Medleys and is now available from FBBC at the retail level at a good price.  No one has ever had it as a stand alone event that I am aware of.  It's as quick as the Flask I think and fairly cheap - I have no idea why it never caught on really.  It's a fixed 2" but could be (and has been ) made in other widths.  Better promotion might be the why the flask is now popular and the Climber Pinch never caught on - but who knows. 

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