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How would you like to see GripSport grow?


richcottrell

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Mikael Siversson
1 hour ago, Jared Goguen said:

Please post links, and names of people that have came in with good strong ideas and then "then ultimately loose interest and disappear when they can't have it their way."? I have not seen that in the past two ish years.

Good ideas are typically implemented sooner or later so that has never been a problem. Many of these 'new' ideas however are poorly disguised attempts at replacing 'classic' events with something softer that would fit in a fitness gym.

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MCrushetta
23 minutes ago, Jedd Johnson said:

Just so it doesn't seem like I totally contradicted myself up above.... 

There's never been a woman competitor who has voiced a desire to be on the committee.  However, Maryanne McKeague would often take part in discussions, either directly with myself, or with her husband Brent Barbe.

Maria, if you're interested in being a part of NAGS discussions, I think ti would be great to have you involved, personally.

I am happy to help or offer input - but that was not my intention with the post above. I was trying to articulate that if the sport is to grow, be more inclusive, progressive, and include younger people, women, older people, athletes of all types - we need to include those people in focus groups / feedback conversations etc. I suggested Amy because she has an impressive grip career behind her and has been involved much longer than someone like me who is new, still learning the sport and gripboard. I do, however, have a lot of experience in the fitness industry and with strength sports  -  and can answer any questions you have from that 'lense' as well. 

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Bryan Hunsaker

Hey everyone - we just held a very low-key sort of grip challenge at the Fit Con out here in Salt Lake.  We didn't have a ton of actual competitors, but we were able to get a lot of spectators and spill-over from other events like IPL and the OLY comp.  The likes of Chad Wesley Smith came over and tried to pick-up my dumbbell and gave the VBAR and FLASK a go, and even Robert Oberst came and checked things out.  We probably had over 80 people try the various implements, which was really cool.  I had to dig into my own pocket to give out prizes and prize money, but it gave some great exposure.  And thanks to Andrew from FBBC for donating an implement as a prize!  A lot of people voiced interest in competing next time around, and Van Hatfield, the strongman promoter already made arrangements to redo the grip portion next year, and on a larger scale.  So as pertains to the thread: There are not a lot of people that are aware of the sport, out here, but exposure is key.  Once a grip implement is in front of someone, they instinctively seem to have to try it...so really they just need opportunities.  For my two cents, we'll keep throwing events out here to up exposure, and I will do my best to travel to other regional events as time allows.  I'm new on here, but if I can be of any assistance, I'd love to help where I'm needed.

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canthar

I've been gone from this scene for quite some time, instead being focused on Coaching and developing a certification and development program for a certain group. Now that we have moved south for family reasons and closed up shop in the north I am essentially a stay at home parent as we live in a small town and there is not much interest for a high level trainer / coach unless I am willing to travel to be a prof. or take on basic clientele. Still hoping to find some serious people in this area or make arrangements to travel and teach some workshops while offering on line support for people as well. Not that many care about this background but I wanted to post it before I say the rest on Grip Sport.

Most of this I am sure has been stated as discussed before but just throwing a different view point out there perhaps.

 

Exposure and Accessibility are important:

     The GripBoard it self is a good reference and starting point for people to get an idea what GripSport even is. Trying to get regional or even at a later date state by state contacts for training and local competitions would help. Smaller regional champ comps maybe? 

     Events and training need to be fairly simple to set up and gain access too. People need to be able to try it without putting up a huge investment of time or money. Events that require a finicky set up really turn people off. Same when it costs a lot. Starting weight also, few things turn somebody off more than when they cannot even put forth a reasonable attempt.

 

     Having small trials and little comps as part of a larger event could also be helpful in the exposure area.

 

Consistency:

     Rules and events need to be as standardized as possible. Equipment, set up, judging, and basic rules. 

     Unified voice ! We all need to be saying the same things. Organization heads in public need to keep to one message so no confusion or rifts occur.

That is what I would say are the basics that have to be in place for any growth to occur. From there sponsors, marketing and monetary support for promoters and prize pools can further help draw interest.

 

Just my two cents

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Alawadhi
On Monday, May 02, 2016 at 10:43 PM, richcottrell said:

Combined, these two articles got me thinking about grip and GripSport....  I came to reading Milo after discovering the CoC grippers after all.

 

Specifically, it got me thinking about "Where will GripSport be in 10 years?  
or what might GripSport grow into? 

In ten years the grip sport will be much bigger. Many people will come to know it and like me, start by reading John Brookfield books and the gripboard 

What will it look like years from now?  
Will it still be a grassroots yet smaller community?  
Could we see larger cash prizes down the road change the whole level of competition? 

Yep very easily


Will we see more standardization of events? 
Maybe, let see what the flow will take me
Will the unique camaraderie of GripSport be cultivated with the addition of more regional yet annual competitions?
Might be yes too ;)

What is you vision for the Growth of GripSport?

 

 

 

On Monday, May 02, 2016 at 11:37 PM, Biffmaister said:

Major sponsors normally requires organisation/standardization/drug testing.   The only organizer who has this of my knowledge, is World Heavy Events Association(based in Finland)

When I won the WHEA world grip championship last year, I got prizes worth around $600, which I think is great.   

This is the key

I think we will see a lot of changes the next 10 years, hopefully in a positive way. I hope us europeans can compete with americans much more in the future. 

Okay my replies above are in bold. I cannot write in details as I am still in China. But everyone rest assured. Our beloved sport will grow. This last year I have been dedicated to it. Only few people know this. I am seeing many many changes which I will explain later when I return to my country. The changes are good and bad both. It wasn't intentional. It just came by without knowing.

And another thing is the money issue. If you have money, you have power. It's really simple and doesn't require explaination. 600usd in prize is great. Even greater if it was cash. Hey what if it was ten times more in cash? Or twenty times? That got your attention correct? So pateince is the key. I can do this. We can do this. 

Few people here know I am really busy with work. I have many projects to finish. Businesses and so on. One of them is the grip thing. And it is through few steps at a time. Also I'll have my own grip organization here. Then again pateince is the key. 

Hope by then we see many people come to the sport and the old people like Clay, Morton, Rob, even Paul Knight come back. 

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anwnate

@Alawadhi

I'm glad you chimed in.

I think it's great that you are making Grip Sport one of your many priorities.  

A big thanks from myself and the many others (my assumption) that feel the same.

I'm 100% behind the idea that while it will take some time, it will happen.

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climber511
3 hours ago, MCrushetta said:

I'm curious, though why there aren't any women in some of these leadership positions. It is a market that has not really been tapped into yet. I am doing my best to get the word out. Including amazing gripsters like Amy Wattles for example, though, on decisions regarding competitions and standards for NAGS is necessary in my opinion. 

At election time - people put their names forward to be voted on - so far no woman has ever done so - that's the why.  Only the names put forward by the individual themselves are up for voting.  It's not just vote for whoever (whomever?).  Like all politics you have to "run".

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richcottrell

 

I am going to have to disagree about Mighty Mitts being bad for the growth of grip sport.  They can run parallel in my world.  They can be separate branches of the same tree.

 

As a matter of fact, Mighty Mitts [and grip comps also built along the "World's Strongest Man" idea] is one of the few Grip Events that could be considered a true spectator event.  The size of the implements and guys competing gets people's attention.  It attracts a broader audience... and watching a bunch of true gladiators go at it gets people pumped up… and when there is also something to be won that has real value, it keeps the public also interested in who might win.  And the bigger that prize gets, the more competitive the competition becomes.
Once you have that captive audience's attention, you also have a chance to introduce many new people from other strength sports to the greater world of GripSport.

 

You could be a MightyMitts fan once a year, and then for your own pride and bragging rights you can also do local GripSport events for the rest of the year.  At the smaller GripSort comps, like the ones I have been to so far, they seem to be more about the camaraderie of getting together.  There you can learn new things and meet other grip enthusiasts.

 

That said, I do agree with Chris that watching people close grippers is far from exciting..., but what easier way to introduce someone to Grip then putting a heavy TSG in their hands for the first time.  

 

In regards to attracting women to the sport, this seems obvious to improve the scope of competition.  

When i was in high school and college, Pole Vaulting was a men's only Track and Field event.  There was much sexism about why women should or could not pole vault, but right around the time i was getting out of college [1998], the Pole Vault became open to women vaulters.  The timing was perfect as the expense of the equipment and insurance had many high school programs looking to eliminate the event.  Finally making the event open for women is probably the only thing that kept Pole Vaulting alive on the high school level, and now on the Olympic level the US women are very competitive.

 

That said, the Pole Vault was a boys club, and I do not know how hard those first women pioneers had to work to pierce that boys club mentality.  I can see the same thing happen in GripSport.  So far, Grip has been a boys club [or at least it seems like that is true from my limited exposure]

 

If we are truly to be inclusive, we would each have to change the sign over the club house door.  It can not say “Men only” anymore.  But that would not do it alown.  We would need to develop and cultivate.  We need to look for other pioneers like Elizabeth Horne.  [BTW: She can bend bigger steel and lift more them me].  Basically the greater community has to rally around the cause as well... 

 

As to the idea of standardization of equipment.  
I do see that a necessity if you want to have numbers that can be compared over the years as the sport continues to grow.  I do see it as a problem if only one company is making the "comp spec" gear, but when your also trying to eliminate the differences in implements, I do see how having a single supplier helps alleviate some concerns. 
The great number of different possible grip events is mind boggling and when you add the different sizes possible on things like the Euro, thick bar, the variation is staggering.   While the crazy number of different ways to train grip is one thing I love about grip, if we are talking Sport, then there has to be some way to shrink down the number of possibilities somehow.

 

 

 

I am glad I started this conversation, and I apologize for not offering my own opinions in a more refined way.  I go away on a trip to NC tomorrow and I will be offline for a week.  I look forward to returning and reading a wealth of insight and opinion.  Lets try to keep it positive.

 

 

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Mikael Siversson
4 hours ago, richcottrell said:

The great number of different possible grip events is mind boggling and when you add the different sizes possible on things like the Euro, thick bar, the variation is staggering.   While the crazy number of different ways to train grip is one thing I love about grip, if we are talking Sport, then there has to be some way to shrink down the number of possibilities somehow.

 

 

 

It is highly unlikely that classic hand size neutral events will go out of popularity any time soon (eg Euro, adjustable thickbar) as they provide legitimate bragging rights. No excuse if you don't excel on an implement where you can set it right in your optimal power band. With a fixed width implement valid excuses can be voiced. People trying to replace the arguably most prestigious event in the grip sport tend to have one thing in common and that is that they are not at elite level in the pinch. We have some striking examples of this in this thread. You don't hear David Horne or Aaron complaining too much about this implement for example.

 

When people complain about specific events the first thing I check is where they sit in their weight class on the NAGS lists in the event they complain about. Just about invariably it is near the bottom. Your complaints would be taken more seriously if you were at elite level in said event.

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richcottrell

Mikael,

i did not complain about any particular event or implement so i hope your not  putting that on my comments.  But you quoted me so I would like to have the record put straight if there is any misconception.  

My observation was that there has been a great variety of accepted grip events, and maybe that amount of variety is one of the things that might hold GripSport back from "getting bigger" in the future.   

At one point Olympic lifting included lifts that are no longer part of Olympic competition.  For example, all Olympic Lifts are now two hand lifts. 

If something like that were applied to grip, (just as an example) you would only see 2HP on the Euro.  1HP would not be a "Competition Lift" anymore

i am not saying this should be done, but it does simplify the leader boards.   When the sport is more simple to compare across weight classes and to compare athletes over the passing years a true Sport can emerge.

that was the opinion I was trying to express.

Rich

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anwnate
9 minutes ago, Mikael Siversson said:

It is highly unlikely that classic hand size neutral events will go out of popularity any time soon (eg Euro, adjustable thickbar) as they provide legitimate bragging rights. No excuse if you don't excel on an implement where you can set it right in your optimal power band. With a fixed width implement valid excuses can be voiced. People trying to replace the arguably most prestigious event in the grip sport tend to have one thing in common and that is that they are not at elite level in the pinch. We have some striking examples of this in this thread. You don't hear David Horne or Aaron complaining too much about this implement for example.

 

When people complain about specific events the first thing I check is where they sit in their weight class on the NAGS lists in the event they complain about. Just about invariably it is near the bottom. Your complaints would be taken more seriously if you were at elite level in said event.

That's one way of looking at it, but it attributes a shallowness to those listening to the complaints.

As far as hand size neutral events go, here in America, already 2/3 of the events tested at NAGSC don't fit that bill (tsgs and axle). 

You can add me to the list of people at the bottom of the list...that complain about the Euro. My complaints don't stem from my poor showing on an implement I never train.  They stem from reality.  The Euro is an expensive, heavy, unwieldy device that is the bane of newbies and grip contests with more than 7 people.  While it has the distinct advantage of being handsize neutral, the fact is that there is no quality control on the texture of said apparatus...and both David Horne and Aaron will admit that they may be able to pull 10-20lbs more on one Euro over another. In a sport where you are allowed to set a world record with a single lb...or less, that should seem completely ridiculous to both a newbie and an elite gripster.

Additionally...since this thread is about growing Gripsport...I've  got to say that there is no way I'm ever going to run a Euro to test pinch in a contest.  In 5 weeks+ I'm expecting 25 competitors...several of them who are completely new to the sport.  If we want to grow Gripsport, we need to make it more accessible and easier to pick up (pun intended).

Those truly interested in seeing gripsport grow are willing to seriously listen to any idea or complaint, for the betterment of the sport.

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Buccos1
1 hour ago, anwnate said:

While it has the distinct advantage of being handsize neutral, the fact is that there is no quality control on the texture of said apparatus...and both David Horne and Aaron will admit that they may be able to pull 10-20lbs more on one Euro over another. In a sport where you are allowed to set a world record with a single lb...or less, that should seem completely ridiculous to both a newbie and an elite gripster.

Well-said Nate.  In the few contests I've done the Euro, the texture/seasoning killed me.  (That, and inexperience in choosing attempts.)  I trained on a smooth surface, with light chalk and then had to adjust to a completely different surface at the comp.  To me, at least, it never felt right and ended up costing me 15-20lbs (2-hand).  

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canthar

I have to agree I feel the Euro is not an ideal implement for growth. It's just not very accessible. 

 

As for grippers just about every single person I have introduced to grip training to help their sport has found them to be the least interesting thing to watch and train. Some got better at them and started to get more consistent using them but from a spectator perspective they are not very good.  Most people are visual and even though what they may see being used is in fact easier than a stack of plates for example their brain tells them otherwise. 

Gotta find a balance, not sure what that is but this is why we have discussions. 

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MCrushetta
11 hours ago, anwnate said:

That's one way of looking at it, but it attributes a shallowness to those listening to the complaints.

As far as hand size neutral events go, here in America, already 2/3 of the events tested at NAGSC don't fit that bill (tsgs and axle). 

You can add me to the list of people at the bottom of the list...that complain about the Euro. My complaints don't stem from my poor showing on an implement I never train.  They stem from reality.  The Euro is an expensive, heavy, unwieldy device that is the bane of newbies and grip contests with more than 7 people.  While it has the distinct advantage of being handsize neutral, the fact is that there is no quality control on the texture of said apparatus...and both David Horne and Aaron will admit that they may be able to pull 10-20lbs more on one Euro over another. In a sport where you are allowed to set a world record with a single lb...or less, that should seem completely ridiculous to both a newbie and an elite gripster.

Additionally...since this thread is about growing Gripsport...I've  got to say that there is no way I'm ever going to run a Euro to test pinch in a contest.  In 5 weeks+ I'm expecting 25 competitors...several of them who are completely new to the sport.  If we want to grow Gripsport, we need to make it more accessible and easier to pick up (pun intended).

Those truly interested in seeing gripsport grow are willing to seriously listen to any idea or complaint, for the betterment of the sport.

I like your point about devices being expensive. One of the things we all need to think about, if the sport is going to grow, is making training advice and implements accessible to people that aren't quite sure yet what we are all about. Making the sport interesting to new people and not scary is paramount. It's also not about 'winning' and being on the leaderboards. It's about people, getting stronger, and being excited about it - which means all the grip peeps, myself included need to think outside the box and put ourselves in other peoples shoes.

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MCrushetta
12 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

It is highly unlikely that classic hand size neutral events will go out of popularity any time soon (eg Euro, adjustable thickbar) as they provide legitimate bragging rights. No excuse if you don't excel on an implement where you can set it right in your optimal power band. With a fixed width implement valid excuses can be voiced. People trying to replace the arguably most prestigious event in the grip sport tend to have one thing in common and that is that they are not at elite level in the pinch. We have some striking examples of this in this thread. You don't hear David Horne or Aaron complaining too much about this implement for example.

When people complain about specific events the first thing I check is where they sit in their weight class on the NAGS lists in the event they complain about. Just about invariably it is near the bottom. Your complaints would be taken more seriously if you were at elite level in said event.

I think this discussion is more about improving grip sport and fostering growth. I like to assume that not everyone talking about the growth of the sport is that consumed with where they sit on the records list. Since very few women compete, my euro lift has put me in the middle of the list - maybe on the high end for my 'weight class' - and I don't really care if it goes up or down right now - I just want to get better. I am particularly interested in growing the sport as I have encountered many women in my years of coaching that need hand strength but are a little overwhelmed by the implements and how to become involved.

The first time I encountered the Euro in a grip competition it was a one hand lift - and I couldn't lift it empty so I skipped it. This is a valid concern for newbies and women across the board. Training other pinch implements one handed lead me to be able to lift the Euro two handed, with a little more confidence than I would have had otherwise. I also don't hate the Euro - I enjoyed it at the AZ comp - but it is cumbersome, not easy to lug around to the gym, and time consuming to set up.

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Mikael Siversson

I knew this was going to be yet another "I hate the Euro pinch" thread. Although you will never admit it, I think the name alone annoys more than a few of you (we can always call it the 'Americano'). It must feel depressing every time we have a voting on the most prestigious grip event and the Euro 2HP comes out on top every time. David Horne did a great job inventing the implement and if you don't like it then simply avoid competitions in which it is featured and don't use it in competitions organised by you and your buddies. However don't expect everyone else to join you in celebration of the latest invention by someone that may or may not hang around in the long run.

Why not try getting stronger in the pinch rather than just admitting defeat, which is effectively what you are doing.

I also suspect many here don't care too much about other people, marginally interested in grip sport, getting a stronger grip but enjoy the game of not only getting as strong as possible but preferably also beating every one else (at least in their weight class) in the process. Competing against people with a lukewarm interest in grip is boring anyway.

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canthar
4 minutes ago, Mikael Siversson said:

I knew this was going to be yet another "I hate the Euro pinch" thread. Although you will never admit it, I think the name alone annoys more than a few of you (we can always call it the 'Americano'). It must feel depressing every time we have a voting on the most prestigious grip event and the Euro 2HP comes out on top every time. David Horne did a great job inventing the implement and if you don't like it then simply avoid competitions in which it is featured and don't use it in competitions organised by you and your buddies. However don't expect everyone else to join you in celebration of the latest invention by someone that may or may not hang around in the long run.

Why not try getting stronger in the pinch rather than just admitting defeat, which is effectively what you are doing.

I also suspect many here don't care too much about other people, marginally interested in grip sport, getting a stronger grip but enjoy the game of not only getting as strong as possible but preferably also beating every one else (at least in their weight class) in the process. Competing against people with a lukewarm interest in grip is boring anyway.

I doubt it is intended but that statement comes across as elitist and for newbies it makes us all look bad. Personally my dislike for Euro is really about the ease of use. Not a great intro event. I do think it has a place, especially in the upper echelons of the grip world. 

We need to think about catering to various levels of competitors and keeping in fun to get growth. Get people in and slowly introduce them to more as they get going and interested.

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Mikael Siversson

As I indicated credibility goes way up if you complain about a lift you are at the elite level in. As for drawing people into the grip sport sure by all means use any implement you may find useful. Grippers are an excellent example as they are cheap and simple and most get drawn into grip sport by first being exposed to this implement. Regarding texture differences I believe Bob had a shockingly bad experience performance-wise with the flask. I think you will find that all friction lifts regardless of surfaces will vary depending on eg temperature and humidity.

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Mikael Siversson
12 hours ago, richcottrell said:

Mikael,

i did not complain about any particular event or implement so i hope your not  putting that on my comments.  But you quoted me so I would like to have the record put straight if there is any misconception.  

 

No I was not referring to you so apologies if that is how it came across.

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Mikael Siversson
1 hour ago, MCrushetta said:

 

The first time I encountered the Euro in a grip competition it was a one hand lift - and I couldn't lift it empty so I skipped it. This is a valid concern for newbies and women across the board. Training other pinch implements one handed lead me to be able to lift the Euro two handed, with a little more confidence than I would have had otherwise. I also don't hate the Euro - I enjoyed it at the AZ comp - but it is cumbersome, not easy to lug around to the gym, and time consuming to set up.

One thing that will not work if you want to spread the sport is to, indirectly, have a go at the leading figures in grip. Your hubby produced a video in which he gave an example of his friends finding the 2HP Euro device so boring to watch they fell asleep. That may have been the case but does that really help unifying the grip sport? David Horne, who invented the Euro device, has absolute support in the UK grip sport community and he is also strongly supported by the Finns who use most of his grip 'toys'. It's a bit of an insult as David put a lot of thought into the device in order to make it as fair as possible.

Rather than worry too much about implements that may appear 'intimidating' to newbies why not ask the Finns how they are succeeding? Grip sport is, by a huge margin, more popular in Finland than anywhere else and they often use the Euro pinch device so its clearly not there the problem lies.

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Squeezus
On 5/3/2016 at 8:43 AM, Mikael Siversson said:

The current leadership is just fine. They were voted in for reason as they have stood the test of time and demonstrated long term commitment. We have had these discussions many times and it is always repeating itself with new people having strong ideas on how to change things and then they ultimately loose interest and disappear when they can't have it their way.

 

 

23 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

Good ideas are typically implemented sooner or later so that has never been a problem. Many of these 'new' ideas however are poorly disguised attempts at replacing 'classic' events with something softer that would fit in a fitness gym.

 

14 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

It is highly unlikely that classic hand size neutral events will go out of popularity any time soon (eg Euro, adjustable thickbar) as they provide legitimate bragging rights. No excuse if you don't excel on an implement where you can set it right in your optimal power band. With a fixed width implement valid excuses can be voiced. People trying to replace the arguably most prestigious event in the grip sport tend to have one thing in common and that is that they are not at elite level in the pinch. We have some striking examples of this in this thread. You don't hear David Horne or Aaron complaining too much about this implement for example.

 

When people complain about specific events the first thing I check is where they sit in their weight class on the NAGS lists in the event they complain about. Just about invariably it is near the bottom. Your complaints would be taken more seriously if you were at elite level in said event.

 

2 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

I knew this was going to be yet another "I hate the Euro pinch" thread. Although you will never admit it, I think the name alone annoys more than a few of you (we can always call it the 'Americano'). It must feel depressing every time we have a voting on the most prestigious grip event and the Euro 2HP comes out on top every time. David Horne did a great job inventing the implement and if you don't like it then simply avoid competitions in which it is featured and don't use it in competitions organised by you and your buddies. However don't expect everyone else to join you in celebration of the latest invention by someone that may or may not hang around in the long run.

Why not try getting stronger in the pinch rather than just admitting defeat, which is effectively what you are doing.

I also suspect many here don't care too much about other people, marginally interested in grip sport, getting a stronger grip but enjoy the game of not only getting as strong as possible but preferably also beating every one else (at least in their weight class) in the process. Competing against people with a lukewarm interest in grip is boring anyway.

 

1 hour ago, Mikael Siversson said:

As I indicated credibility goes way up if you complain about a lift you are at the elite level in. As for drawing people into the grip sport sure by all means use any implement you may find useful. Grippers are an excellent example as they are cheap and simple and most get drawn into grip sport by first being exposed to this implement. Regarding texture differences I believe Bob had a shockingly bad experience performance-wise with the flask. I think you will find that all friction lifts regardless of surfaces will vary depending on eg temperature and humidity.

 

1 hour ago, Mikael Siversson said:

No I was not referring to you so apologies if that is how it came across.

 

6 minutes ago, Mikael Siversson said:

One thing that will not work if you want to spread the sport is to, indirectly, have a go at the leading figures in grip. Your hubby produced a video in which he gave an example of his friends finding the 2HP Euro device so boring to watch they fell asleep. That may have been the case but does that really help unifying the grip sport? David Horne, who invented the Euro device, has absolute support in the UK grip sport community and he is also strongly supported by the Finns who use most of his grip 'toys'. It's a bit of an insult as David put a lot of thought into the device in order to make it as fair as possible.

Rather than worry too much about implements that may appear 'intimidating' to newbies why not ask the Finns how they are succeeding? Grip sport is, by a huge margin, more popular in Finland than anywhere else and they often use the Euro pinch device so its clearly not there the problem lies.

 @Mikael Siversson, this thread is about growing Gripsport. Yet, in 7 posts, you have not managed to make a single suggestion, aside from "ask the Finns". If you have anything to add aside from attacking everyone else's ideas and credibility, we would love to hear it. Let's try to stay on topic for the sake of a productive discussion.

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Mikael Siversson

"Asking the Finns' is probably the best suggestion thus far.

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canthar

Gotta think about growth at EVERY level not just the elite end of the spectrum. 

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Lucasraymond
2 hours ago, Mikael Siversson said:

As I indicated credibility goes way up if you complain about a lift you are at the elite level in. As for drawing people into the grip sport sure by all means use any implement you may find useful. Grippers are an excellent example as they are cheap and simple and most get drawn into grip sport by first being exposed to this implement. Regarding texture differences I believe Bob had a shockingly bad experience performance-wise with the flask. I think you will find that all friction lifts regardless of surfaces will vary depending on eg temperature and humidity.

I agree and disagree with you Mikael in some ways....the Euro I love as I think it is appropriate for the elite level gripsters due to the optimal width but I can totally see how the time consuming aspect is the problem. I love spending 5-6 hours at a grip contest but then again I devote the day to the contest others are not so committed. The time consuming part in that event comes more from people not knowing their appropriate width (which if you are new to it we should just give them a set width (48 or 54mm) just to start on but having the other implements available is good for the growth of the sport. Any technical lift is going to be much more difficult for a newbie versus and experienced person. What I do agree with you is I don't like using alternatives to steel such as aluminum (6061), as I bought 1/4" aluminum plates for the euro and after using 40 grit sandpaper to roughen the surface chalk still barely sticks to it whereas painted steel holds chalk much better. The other problem is that it already has a dent on the edge which looks like a weight was dropped on it. When lifting on aluminum there is almost a 5-10% decreased in overall performance compared to steel (mild seasoned like mine versus Jedd's which is very seasoned the difference is more). 

 

The question as far as voting people in as moderator comes to people being dedicated to the sport and the people that are in that position currently have to been dedicated for a long time. I've been in grip for 3 years and have seen a bunch of people come and go, all levels of the sport. So to vote people that are fairly new, the inexperience would bring possibly new ideas or just old ideas that were discussed 5x prior. Having a 6-8 person committee with the current moderators and maybe 2 new ones that get voted in each year or biannually might be a possibility. 

 

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