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Forearm Volume


greppstark
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Those are two very good exercises specifically since you're interested in armwrestling because it forces other muscle involvement. If you are looking specifically for forearm volume, you can grab your wrist with your opposing hand and likely increase the weight, though this will not have the same effect on what armwrestlers refer to your lock. Essentially the ability to use many of the muscles you would use in an armwrestling match synergistically. You can also change the angle of your body, walking your body into different positions around your hand. For example you could position yourself so that your palm is facing toward you (like you are curling toward you) rather than just straight to the side with a neutral grip and you can change your angle so you are behind your hand curling the weight away from you (toward your opponent like in a post position on the table or press position).

Edited by James Retarides
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thanks James! I'll be trying those variations for sure. btw I got your e book and look forward to start reading it. My forearms felt so good after doing this and I love this handle now. For me it feels a lot better than using the Tbull 3 inch grips. Also waiting for the 2.5" crusher in the mail to help me prepare for the King Kong Grip challenge.

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The crusher is a beast, very humbling. If armwrestling is your goal, certainly reduce the handle sizes you use to two inches and below. Arnwrestling, coupled with training with handles too thick can do havoc to your thumbs.

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I also have a RB 76 mm handle. When I use it for single hand deadlifts I sometime feel little pain in my fingers or wrist. Is it simply because the handle is to thick for my hands?.

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James, is it a good idea to do what the video clip is doing but instead of the weight pulling my forearms against/away my body, I make the weight to pull to my sides. Imagine as if someone is pulling me down

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The crusher is a beast, very humbling. If armwrestling is your goal, certainly reduce the handle sizes you use to two inches and below. Arnwrestling, coupled with training with handles too thick can do havoc to your thumbs.

Will keep that in mind. Thanks James.

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I also have a RB 76 mm handle. When I use it for single hand deadlifts I sometime feel little pain in my fingers or wrist. Is it simply because the handle is to thick for my hands?.

I imagine that it's more likely to have finger pain with one arm deadlifts vs other exercises with such a handle, because you are just squeezing it with all fingers max effort. I think with Grip Sport training is almost impossible not to have pain in hands/fingers/elbows at some point. Hopefully tissues and nervous system adapt, loading capacity improves, and you can tolerate more. Sometimes that's not the case which can lead to persistent pain.

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also with doing regular wrist curls with this handle (forearm resting on thigh) you can move your thumb away towards the other side which minimizes stress in the thumb joints

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James, is it a good idea to do what the video clip is doing but instead of the weight pulling my forearms against/away my body, I make the weight to pull to my sides. Imagine as if someone is pulling me down

To protect your shoulders and elbows do not do too much work where the resistance is pulling to the side. Internal and external rotation training from the wrong angle can lead to long term problems. I wish I knew this information before it was too late. If you picture an armwrestling table, imagine an opponent not just pushing sideways directly toward the pin pad but pulling back to the corner on their side of the table at the same time. So doing wrist movements at that specific angle is preferable.

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James, is it a good idea to do what the video clip is doing but instead of the weight pulling my forearms against/away my body, I make the weight to pull to my sides. Imagine as if someone is pulling me down

To protect your shoulders and elbows do not do too much work where the resistance is pulling to the side. Internal and external rotation training from the wrong angle can lead to long term problems. I wish I knew this information before it was too late. If you picture an armwrestling table, imagine an opponent not just pushing sideways directly toward the pin pad but pulling back to the corner on their side of the table at the same time. So doing wrist movements at that specific angle is preferable.

Thanks! Really appreciate the reply.
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