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Why I'm Not Fond Of Grippers Anymore


Volko Krull

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Frank Pizzo

Being happy or depressed has nothing to do with ones strength or lack there of. You said it all when you said you were 19...you still have a lot to learn about life. Strength is never a weakness, and neither is intelligence. If being strong helps me in my career why wouldn't I lift weights?? If being smart helps me raise my three kids why wouldn't I read books and talk to other parents? Life is what you make of it...good or bad, happy or sad. Good luck with it!

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I love grippers so much. Closing them is very satisfying to me. Therapeutic practically. I like to hold them and not even close them. Here is a haiku about grippers: A worthy challenge Rock the awe

oh yeah!! Hello Chris!! pleased to argue with you Let us take two athletes- one does grippers (e.g. closes 3.5 gripper from 20 mm block), pinching and thick bars - other one does pinch and thick b

I do agree that things like thickbar and pinch have far more carryover to real life than grippers. But then again, love is rarely logical. I still love grippers.

climber511

Guys i am 19 years old and i got a 600 deadlift,400 bench and 500 squat.I also closed the 4 and the ghp 9 and trust me when i tell you that nothing makes me feel better than being big and strong.But is a fact that strength is not something you need in everyday life.I know tons of guys that are ridiculously weak but still happier than me.

It may not be something YOU need but much of the world works physically for their living. I worked construction - trimmed trees and did all kinds of "work" that required lifting and lugging a lot of heavy things - at times gut busting levels of strength in unwieldy positions. For much of my life I made my living working with my muscles. Most people except for the last few decades HAD to be strong. Most never saw a barbell but had strength that would make a gym rat cry to see.

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Frank Pizzo

Guys i am 19 years old and i got a 600 deadlift,400 bench and 500 squat.I also closed the 4 and the ghp 9 and trust me when i tell you that nothing makes me feel better than being big and strong.But is a fact that strength is not something you need in everyday life.I know tons of guys that are ridiculously weak but still happier than me.

It may not be something YOU need but much of the world works physically for their living. I worked construction - trimmed trees and did all kinds of "work" that required lifting and lugging a lot of heavy things - at times gut busting levels of strength in unwieldy positions. For much of my life I made my living working with my muscles. Most people except for the last few decades HAD to be strong. Most never saw a barbell but had strength that would make a gym rat cry to see.

Exactly!

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PeterSweden

Guys i am 19 years old and i got a 600 deadlift,400 bench and 500 squat.I also closed the 4 and the ghp 9 and trust me when i tell you that nothing makes me feel better than being big and strong.But is a fact that strength is not something you need in everyday life.I know tons of guys that are ridiculously weak but still happier than me.

It may not be something YOU need but much of the world works physically for their living. I worked construction - trimmed trees and did all kinds of "work" that required lifting and lugging a lot of heavy things - at times gut busting levels of strength in unwieldy positions. For much of my life I made my living working with my muscles. Most people except for the last few decades HAD to be strong. Most never saw a barbell but had strength that would make a gym rat cry to see.

I can tell you that you are very right about this.

I was working with a man in his 40ies, building houses out of lumber.

Heavy logs, really heavy.

He didnt look very special, just average and a rather big belly.

I was pretty swollen back then from a couple of years of eating like a horse and training in the gym 5-6 days a week.

We were laughing and arguing about strength so I gave him a shove to see if a wrestlingmatch would come on :)

He grabbed me so damn hard and threw me on the ground like nothing. I felt like a small child.

I thought I broke my neck when he grabbed me.

I've been training BBJ and grappling for a couple of years when I was younger and been grappling with 100+kg men. No one made me feel this small :)

When I had verbaly "tapped out" he helped me up and we sat down to eat lunch.

He told me he had been training judo and lifting logs of 20 years.

Powerful finnish dude. Scary feeling being dominated like that :)

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beef_supreme

Guys i am 19 years old and i got a 600 deadlift,400 bench and 500 squat.I also closed the 4 and the ghp 9 and trust me when i tell you that nothing makes me feel better than being big and strong.But is a fact that strength is not something you need in everyday life.I know tons of guys that are ridiculously weak but still happier than me.

It may not be something YOU need but much of the world works physically for their living. I worked construction - trimmed trees and did all kinds of "work" that required lifting and lugging a lot of heavy things - at times gut busting levels of strength in unwieldy positions. For much of my life I made my living working with my muscles. Most people except for the last few decades HAD to be strong. Most never saw a barbell but had strength that would make a gym rat cry to see.

This just goes to prove that there's a huge difference between training for specific athletic events and "real life". Construction worker or a lumberjack might be "functionally stronger" (in some aspects) than an office worker who sits at the desk all day and spends 3-4 hours a week at the gym doing pulls/squats/presses, does that mean though that the office worker should go cut some trees instead?

Also, OP is implying that, for example, grippers don't translate well into the "real world" situations because the handles are "too small in diameter".

Well, the olympic bar isn't all that thick either. Replace it with a thick bar though and you'll get a grip workout while the body part that's typically hit by that same exercise won't get hit as hard. If gripper handles were thicker for example then the ROM would be shortened etc.

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Ivarboneless

Strength, athleticism, and general fitness may not be required for everyday life, depending on whose life we're talking about, but it definitely provides an advantage. I think it's borderline foolish to totally ignore improving yourself physically beyond what's required to be "healthy" because it limits your adaptability and versatility in different environments and situations. Strong/athletic men can go into the mountains, can work physical jobs, can better protect themselves in physical confrontations, can better rescue/self-rescue, etc. Essentially, the more physically capable one is, the more opportunities are available. A healthy but untrained man is limited and must deliberately avoid circumstances which the athletic man is free to experience.

For example, I have twice rescued people close to me from the water. I know full well the dangers of attempting a water rescue, and I would have been unable to make either rescue if I wasn't a strong swimmer. An un-athletic man had better avoid those situations at all costs or else he would be stuck watching his friends drown or drowning himself while attempting to aid them.

Furthermore, the experience of training rigorously hardens the spirit which is useful in and of itself. Different types of strength, athleticism, or fitness are of different benefit in different situations, but I dare say the trained man is almost always in a better situation than an otherwise equivalent man. For the reasons listed above, I can certainly say that athleticism has impacted my life, and I can perceive the effect on a regular basis. Maximal strength at all costs (weight and fat gain) is probably less useful than other types of strength, but again, it comes with it's advantages and is certainly an advantage over a similar, un-trained individual.

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ultrazls1

This is just my experience for the most part but my weightlifting has almost always directly transitioned into my real world "functional strength". I have never been out hauling wood or whatever type of man work you want to use as an example and had someone I could dominate at the gym keep up with me on functional activities.

I dont know what my reasons for wanting to be big and strong are. It is just part of me. IMO a man isnt a man if he is weak and has no muscle. Thats a woman (well some). I dont give a damn if it helps me or not with anything in life. I enjoy walking into a room and knowing I am the strongest guy there which is the case about 95 percent of the time. I like being alpha.

I think it is partly my generation (im 29). Grew up watching arnold, hulk hogan stallone etc etc since before I could walk. Played with GI Joes. You get the picture. To me growing up being a real man was being like them.

But it is actually useful in the long run. I am healthy and fit. I can go out and do whatever activity I want and not worry about having any trouble doing it for the most part. And it never hurts to look good for the ladies. Good enough for me.

Guess it comes down to what you want in life/what is important to you.

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Geralt

Let's be honest. It's nice to have the feeling that you are pretty strong, but that's of course very relative. Say one of my goals for instance is to deadlift 440 lbs. That's stronger than most people in my surroundings can apprehend. So that makes me feel good. Does that make me strong? Hell no, with the Youtube and forums like this I tend to feel like a little baby sometimes. That said, despite my - for a strength community - low strength, I am a strong guy for most people like I said. However when it comes to reallife, it's indeed the carrying of odd shaped objects that rules a lot of barbellstrength out. For instance, carrying a washingmachine up the stairs. Fumbling around with small and sharp edges etc I have the same effort as my friend who has never touched a barbell in his whole life. I think you almost can not outtrain a guy who's in scaffold building while you are for instance in a deskjob.

That said, I think it's good to have the intention to better yourself. That's what's the whole training is about, whether it's grippers (which on theirselves may not be the smartest way to gripdomination) or barbellwork. If one's just training grip for the ability the crush the hell out of other peoples hands I would say you're quite a sad person. Also, be prepared when you think you are strong so you can get into a fight. I have learned one thing and that is NEVER judge a book by it's cover. I have done some Krav Maga work and the guy working me hasn't got that much interest in weight training. However, if you think you can manhandle the little guy because you happen to bench 300 lbs, you have another thing coming, he WILL choke you out.

What I am meaning to say is there will always be someone faster, stronger, etc. I like my quest for certing the #3 gripper a lot although it's taking me some time. I am realistic and know that I am probably not genetically gifted for weighttraining. But it's the persistance that will let me achieve my goal. I would have been better off starting gripwork more allround with thickbar and stuff, but I wasn't aware when I started of all that trainingoptions. I also started relatively late after that with regular weighttraining. However when I first pinched the Europinch I lifted 87,5 kg which is not great maybe but still very decent. And that while most gripwork for me consists of grippers and second thickbar and other accessorywork. So I must have build some strength somewhere with those stupid grippers.

In the end you like grippers or you don't. I like them a lot and don't understand for instance the gripperbashing on forum like the GOPD thread in the IM forum. People are taking things way out of proportion. Just train and improve yourself, so that in the end you can say indeed 'Well, it didn't go exactly as planned, but I am OK with it.'

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ultrazls1

Let's be honest. It's nice to have the feeling that you are pretty strong, but that's of course very relative. Say one of my goals for instance is to deadlift 440 lbs. That's stronger than most people in my surroundings can apprehend. So that makes me feel good. Does that make me strong? Hell no, with the Youtube and forums like this I tend to feel like a little baby sometimes. That said, despite my - for a strength community - low strength, I am a strong guy for most people like I said. However when it comes to reallife, it's indeed the carrying of odd shaped objects that rules a lot of barbellstrength out. For instance, carrying a washingmachine up the stairs. Fumbling around with small and sharp edges etc I have the same effort as my friend who has never touched a barbell in his whole life. I think you almost can not outtrain a guy who's in scaffold building while you are for instance in a deskjob.

That said, I think it's good to have the intention to better yourself. That's what's the whole training is about, whether it's grippers (which on theirselves may not be the smartest way to gripdomination) or barbellwork. If one's just training grip for the ability the crush the hell out of other peoples hands I would say you're quite a sad person. Also, be prepared when you think you are strong so you can get into a fight. I have learned one thing and that is NEVER judge a book by it's cover. I have done some Krav Maga work and the guy working me hasn't got that much interest in weight training. However, if you think you can manhandle the little guy because you happen to bench 300 lbs, you have another thing coming, he WILL choke you out.

What I am meaning to say is there will always be someone faster, stronger, etc. I like my quest for certing the #3 gripper a lot although it's taking me some time. I am realistic and know that I am probably not genetically gifted for weighttraining. But it's the persistance that will let me achieve my goal. I would have been better off starting gripwork more allround with thickbar and stuff, but I wasn't aware when I started of all that trainingoptions. I also started relatively late after that with regular weighttraining. However when I first pinched the Europinch I lifted 87,5 kg which is not great maybe but still very decent. And that while most gripwork for me consists of grippers and second thickbar and other accessorywork. So I must have build some strength somewhere with those stupid grippers.

In the end you like grippers or you don't. I like them a lot and don't understand for instance the gripperbashing on forum like the GOPD thread in the IM forum. People are taking things way out of proportion. Just train and improve yourself, so that in the end you can say indeed 'Well, it didn't go exactly as planned, but I am OK with it.'

I know what your saying for sure about the fighting. But u have to remember 90 percent of people don't have much fighting ability/training and in my minimal experience in scuffles my strength has always helped tremendously. Most fights just end up as somewhat of a wrestling match and my ability to overpower most has always been an advantage rather than not. So in my opinion strength is very important for the average untrained person who gets into a scuffle.

There is a reason just about every type of fighting organization be it boxing or mma etc has weight classes. Even strength sports such as armwrestling and powerlifting etc. Most of the worlds strongest men are gigantic but have no weight limit. But I dont think anyone under about 250 lbs has ever won but I could be wrong. Size and or strength over someone else is almost never a disadvantage.

Edited by ultrazls1
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Geralt

Let's be honest. It's nice to have the feeling that you are pretty strong, but that's of course very relative. Say one of my goals for instance is to deadlift 440 lbs. That's stronger than most people in my surroundings can apprehend. So that makes me feel good. Does that make me strong? Hell no, with the Youtube and forums like this I tend to feel like a little baby sometimes. That said, despite my - for a strength community - low strength, I am a strong guy for most people like I said. However when it comes to reallife, it's indeed the carrying of odd shaped objects that rules a lot of barbellstrength out. For instance, carrying a washingmachine up the stairs. Fumbling around with small and sharp edges etc I have the same effort as my friend who has never touched a barbell in his whole life. I think you almost can not outtrain a guy who's in scaffold building while you are for instance in a deskjob.

That said, I think it's good to have the intention to better yourself. That's what's the whole training is about, whether it's grippers (which on theirselves may not be the smartest way to gripdomination) or barbellwork. If one's just training grip for the ability the crush the hell out of other peoples hands I would say you're quite a sad person. Also, be prepared when you think you are strong so you can get into a fight. I have learned one thing and that is NEVER judge a book by it's cover. I have done some Krav Maga work and the guy working me hasn't got that much interest in weight training. However, if you think you can manhandle the little guy because you happen to bench 300 lbs, you have another thing coming, he WILL choke you out.

What I am meaning to say is there will always be someone faster, stronger, etc. I like my quest for certing the #3 gripper a lot although it's taking me some time. I am realistic and know that I am probably not genetically gifted for weighttraining. But it's the persistance that will let me achieve my goal. I would have been better off starting gripwork more allround with thickbar and stuff, but I wasn't aware when I started of all that trainingoptions. I also started relatively late after that with regular weighttraining. However when I first pinched the Europinch I lifted 87,5 kg which is not great maybe but still very decent. And that while most gripwork for me consists of grippers and second thickbar and other accessorywork. So I must have build some strength somewhere with those stupid grippers.

In the end you like grippers or you don't. I like them a lot and don't understand for instance the gripperbashing on forum like the GOPD thread in the IM forum. People are taking things way out of proportion. Just train and improve yourself, so that in the end you can say indeed 'Well, it didn't go exactly as planned, but I am OK with it.'

I know what your saying for sure about the fighting. But u have to remember 90 percent of people don't have much fighting ability/training and in my minimal experience in scuffles my strength has always helped tremendously. Most fights just end up as somewhat of a wrestling match and my ability to overpower most has always been an advantage rather than not. So in my opinion strength is very important for the average untrained person who gets into a scuffle.

There is a reason just about every type of fighting organization be it boxing or mma etc has weight classes. Even strength sports such as armwrestling and powerlifting etc. Most of the worlds strongest men are gigantic but have no weight limit. But I dont think anyone under about 250 lbs has ever won but I could be wrong. Size and or strength over someone else is almost never a disadvantage.

Right on that bro. Regarding the weightclasses, I was talking reallife carryover. And reality fights don't come in weightclasses. If you are a big guy and a smaller guy wishes to have a 'rendez vous', be damn sure he knows how to defend himself. After all, self defence and fighting is something different than combatSPORT. :) Ok, back to the grippers I like them. You? haha

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Hubgeezer

That said, I think it's good to have the intention to better yourself. That's what's the whole training is about, whether it's grippers (which on theirselves may not be the smartest way to gripdomination) or barbellwork. If one's just training grip for the ability the crush the hell out of other peoples hands I would say you're quite a sad person.

That sums things up nicely.

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ultrazls1

Let's be honest. It's nice to have the feeling that you are pretty strong, but that's of course very relative. Say one of my goals for instance is to deadlift 440 lbs. That's stronger than most people in my surroundings can apprehend. So that makes me feel good. Does that make me strong? Hell no, with the Youtube and forums like this I tend to feel like a little baby sometimes. That said, despite my - for a strength community - low strength, I am a strong guy for most people like I said. However when it comes to reallife, it's indeed the carrying of odd shaped objects that rules a lot of barbellstrength out. For instance, carrying a washingmachine up the stairs. Fumbling around with small and sharp edges etc I have the same effort as my friend who has never touched a barbell in his whole life. I think you almost can not outtrain a guy who's in scaffold building while you are for instance in a deskjob.

That said, I think it's good to have the intention to better yourself. That's what's the whole training is about, whether it's grippers (which on theirselves may not be the smartest way to gripdomination) or barbellwork. If one's just training grip for the ability the crush the hell out of other peoples hands I would say you're quite a sad person. Also, be prepared when you think you are strong so you can get into a fight. I have learned one thing and that is NEVER judge a book by it's cover. I have done some Krav Maga work and the guy working me hasn't got that much interest in weight training. However, if you think you can manhandle the little guy because you happen to bench 300 lbs, you have another thing coming, he WILL choke you out.

What I am meaning to say is there will always be someone faster, stronger, etc. I like my quest for certing the #3 gripper a lot although it's taking me some time. I am realistic and know that I am probably not genetically gifted for weighttraining. But it's the persistance that will let me achieve my goal. I would have been better off starting gripwork more allround with thickbar and stuff, but I wasn't aware when I started of all that trainingoptions. I also started relatively late after that with regular weighttraining. However when I first pinched the Europinch I lifted 87,5 kg which is not great maybe but still very decent. And that while most gripwork for me consists of grippers and second thickbar and other accessorywork. So I must have build some strength somewhere with those stupid grippers.

In the end you like grippers or you don't. I like them a lot and don't understand for instance the gripperbashing on forum like the GOPD thread in the IM forum. People are taking things way out of proportion. Just train and improve yourself, so that in the end you can say indeed 'Well, it didn't go exactly as planned, but I am OK with it.'

I know what your saying for sure about the fighting. But u have to remember 90 percent of people don't have much fighting ability/training and in my minimal experience in scuffles my strength has always helped tremendously. Most fights just end up as somewhat of a wrestling match and my ability to overpower most has always been an advantage rather than not. So in my opinion strength is very important for the average untrained person who gets into a scuffle.

There is a reason just about every type of fighting organization be it boxing or mma etc has weight classes. Even strength sports such as armwrestling and powerlifting etc. Most of the worlds strongest men are gigantic but have no weight limit. But I dont think anyone under about 250 lbs has ever won but I could be wrong. Size and or strength over someone else is almost never a disadvantage.

Right on that bro. Regarding the weightclasses, I was talking reallife carryover. And reality fights don't come in weightclasses. If you are a big guy and a smaller guy wishes to have a 'rendez vous', be damn sure he knows how to defend himself. After all, self defence and fighting is something different than combatSPORT. :) Ok, back to the grippers I like them. You? haha

Ya I like them. Got my first set of COC's on wednesday and already blistered up my hands. Closed the 2.5 with my right the first day...couldnt do it the second day. I like strength stuff/weightlifting etc and this is my next venture. I want to get coc 3 cert. I think that is cool,as hell and something to be proud of.

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Anthony C.

Ivan - I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. Grippers (at least Torsion Spring Grippers) are not necessary to build a good grip - sure they can help - but TSGs could easily be replaced by other things with good results. I seriously dislike TSGs and I don't believe I'm a Troll.

oh yeah!! Hello Chris!! pleased to argue with you :grin:

Let us take two athletes

- one does grippers (e.g. closes 3.5 gripper from 20 mm block), pinching and thick bars

- other one does pinch and thick bars, AND is squeamish with grippers (e.g. closes #3 gripper from deep set as a carryover from his "basic" grip training - thick bars and pinching).

Let they have relatively same level of pinch and supporting, or give even a 5% handicap to second squeamish one.

We give them a 1" V-bar, David Horne's Rim top, adjustable thick bar top, eagle loops for middle finger deadlift, olympic bar for overhand no-hook grip deadlift and dinnie rings. How do you think - who will lift more?

Ivan - nothing much to argue about. Of course TSG grippers will help but I think the same results can be achieved with something like an Ivanko Super Gripper - finger curls, well designed grip machine etc. And choked closes on TSGs will build support strength as well as parallel or 20mm block sets. I don't think its the "setting" process that is doing the strength development. My best choked from parallel close is a COC #4 (195+) and my best block set is ............... well much less (156#). So is my actual crushing strength low or do I simply have a terrible set?

This is probably neither here nor there but damn, with that strong of a choked close I bet you'd be able to ccs an easier 3.5. Why even bother training block set?

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climber511

Ivan - I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. Grippers (at least Torsion Spring Grippers) are not necessary to build a good grip - sure they can help - but TSGs could easily be replaced by other things with good results. I seriously dislike TSGs and I don't believe I'm a Troll.

oh yeah!! Hello Chris!! pleased to argue with you :grin:

Let us take two athletes

- one does grippers (e.g. closes 3.5 gripper from 20 mm block), pinching and thick bars

- other one does pinch and thick bars, AND is squeamish with grippers (e.g. closes #3 gripper from deep set as a carryover from his "basic" grip training - thick bars and pinching).

Let they have relatively same level of pinch and supporting, or give even a 5% handicap to second squeamish one.

We give them a 1" V-bar, David Horne's Rim top, adjustable thick bar top, eagle loops for middle finger deadlift, olympic bar for overhand no-hook grip deadlift and dinnie rings. How do you think - who will lift more?

Ivan - nothing much to argue about. Of course TSG grippers will help but I think the same results can be achieved with something like an Ivanko Super Gripper - finger curls, well designed grip machine etc. And choked closes on TSGs will build support strength as well as parallel or 20mm block sets. I don't think its the "setting" process that is doing the strength development. My best choked from parallel close is a COC #4 (195+) and my best block set is ............... well much less (156#). So is my actual crushing strength low or do I simply have a terrible set?

This is probably neither here nor there but damn, with that strong of a choked close I bet you'd be able to ccs an easier 3.5. Why even bother training block set?

Anthony - I guess maybe that's my point, I don't train torsion spring grippers - period - not with any set. There are other things that work for crushing strength besides TSGs.

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Anthony C.

Ivan - I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. Grippers (at least Torsion Spring Grippers) are not necessary to build a good grip - sure they can help - but TSGs could easily be replaced by other things with good results. I seriously dislike TSGs and I don't believe I'm a Troll.

oh yeah!! Hello Chris!! pleased to argue with you :grin:

Let us take two athletes

- one does grippers (e.g. closes 3.5 gripper from 20 mm block), pinching and thick bars

- other one does pinch and thick bars, AND is squeamish with grippers (e.g. closes #3 gripper from deep set as a carryover from his "basic" grip training - thick bars and pinching).

Let they have relatively same level of pinch and supporting, or give even a 5% handicap to second squeamish one.

We give them a 1" V-bar, David Horne's Rim top, adjustable thick bar top, eagle loops for middle finger deadlift, olympic bar for overhand no-hook grip deadlift and dinnie rings. How do you think - who will lift more?

Ivan - nothing much to argue about. Of course TSG grippers will help but I think the same results can be achieved with something like an Ivanko Super Gripper - finger curls, well designed grip machine etc. And choked closes on TSGs will build support strength as well as parallel or 20mm block sets. I don't think its the "setting" process that is doing the strength development. My best choked from parallel close is a COC #4 (195+) and my best block set is ............... well much less (156#). So is my actual crushing strength low or do I simply have a terrible set?

This is probably neither here nor there but damn, with that strong of a choked close I bet you'd be able to ccs an easier 3.5. Why even bother training block set?

Anthony - I guess maybe that's my point, I don't train torsion spring grippers - period - not with any set. There are other things that work for crushing strength besides TSGs.

Fair enough. Can't argue with results.

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Grippers are a great way to increase a facet of grip. Dollar for dollar ,and pound for pound ,a top notch investment. But, just put in the proper perspective be healthy and strong first then develop an all around plan working the pinch and support moves as well. Really strong crushing grip is a help not so much a concealed weapon of evil destruction. There are detractors in any activity this GOPD thing is one of them . I wonder what type of grip they actually have or are those hands used to just type and take in money from the very ones they mock?

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Jones1874

i like using grippers but i find them so frustrating. my crushing grip seems to vary so much from session to session. im still not very strong on them and seem to be stuck on the #2. one session i can bang out 4 or 5 good solid reps, then the next session i seem to be really weak and only able to do 1 fairly poor rep. i have about 5 days rest between gripper sessions but i think im going to leave it a bit longer, say 7-10 days. i have an adjustable RB gripper aswell, but the 'crush' just doesnt feel the same.

Climber, what do you do instead of working with grippers?

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When I use grippers less, TNS, and do less volume with higher intensity, I generally do best. This is looking back over being able to shut A #3 gripper for approximately 20 consecutive years.

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Anthony C.

When I use grippers less, TNS, and do less volume with higher intensity, I generally do best. This is looking back over being able to shut A #3 gripper for approximately 20 consecutive years.

:bow :bow :bow

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Bearcat 74

I haven't touched a gripper in almost a year now, I don't miss them.

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climber511

This goes beyond the original topic but the ability to do "things" other than lift traditional barbells etc can be quite valuable in life. Lot's of guys lift weights and think that it makes them "tough" in a very overall fashion - which isn't always true. The world outside the gym is a very big place - and some very strong people live there - in many ways stronger than gym rats. There is a huge difference between someone who sits at a desk all day and lifts 3 or 4 hours a week (no matter how hard) and someone who works hard (heavy) all day every day. If that same guy then lifts weights on top of that you will find someone who may not have the same one rep max - but will certainly have abilities the office worker will not. People spend too much time in the gym and think that's all there is - it's a big world out there and everyone doesn't think like you do.

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hellswindstaff

This goes beyond the original topic but the ability to do "things" other than lift traditional barbells etc can be quite valuable in life. Lot's of guys lift weights and think that it makes them "tough" in a very overall fashion - which isn't always true. The world outside the gym is a very big place - and some very strong people live there - in many ways stronger than gym rats. There is a huge difference between someone who sits at a desk all day and lifts 3 or 4 hours a week (no matter how hard) and someone who works hard (heavy) all day every day. If that same guy then lifts weights on top of that you will find someone who may not have the same one rep max - but will certainly have abilities the office worker will not. People spend too much time in the gym and think that's all there is - it's a big world out there and everyone doesn't think like you do.

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If you don't think that it's useful being obscenely strong then you've obviously never lived in a dangerous area. Not to mention I don't think that ones mind can reach it's peak without the body being physically refined.

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I just spent the last hour visiting , brainstorming and, listening to the wise words of one of the strongest cats that ever tread the planet. Donnie Thompson with his 3000lb. record power total record was reflecting on training , the wisdom of Louie Simmons ,and giving back to the sport he loves so much. He in his own words said he was hampered by his one minded devotion to training and fully admits that is what it took to reach his one minded goal.. Now ,he helps others to understand the interrelation of , food, training,recovery , and "having a life. "Always a golden moment when he visits.

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climber511

I just spent the last hour visiting , brainstorming and, listening to the wise words of one of the strongest cats that ever tread the planet. Donnie Thompson with his 3000lb. record power total record was reflecting on training , the wisdom of Louie Simmons ,and giving back to the sport he loves so much. He in his own words said he was hampered by his one minded devotion to training and fully admits that is what it took to reach his one minded goal.. Now ,he helps others to understand the interrelation of , food, training,recovery , and "having a life. "Always a golden moment when he visits.

That's a talk I would have enjoyed listening to.

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