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Possible Grip Mutant?


mightyjoe

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I have loads more on my computer... but you know, it's all "fake" stock or "easy" stock, because you know... a blue collar working man from Liverpool has so much extra money to put into having fake bars made for him on a big scale.

Note: Sarcasm.

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This subject comes up pretty consistently - enough so that i wish one of them would just show up and put us all out of our misery. I enjoy seeing what the human potential can be. And without any doub

I managed to get the Oringinal Thomas Inch overhead in 1999 in the Oscar Heidenstam dinner . I've cleaned and pressed a replica Inch dumbbell made by Nathan Holle a few times . I also one hand deadl

Looks like the Mutant is coming for a visit on Dec. 16. There will be some "real deal" equipment there along with some boss hoss grip folks too! Always men and ladies of this stature and honest intere

A larger individual should have a stronger grip than a smaller individual. If he does not it means that he is somewhat of an evolutionary failure (climbing a tree would come in handy on an almost daily basis for early humanoids on the African savanna). Smaller individuals who outperform heavier opponents in grip strength do so because they are superior athletes, end of story. I reserve the right to remain unimpressed by athletes displaying very low grip strength to body weight ratios.

Lastly, there's an unproven assumption that just because an individual is larger in body weight that they

are automatically considered stronger. Not true. Why? Because there's smaller individuals performing greater

feats of grip strength than many of their heavier opponents.

I respect your right to believe whatever you like but the fact remains that it's an unproven assumption that

heavier (considering BW only) individuals should have stronger grips. Other factors would have to be considered

as well to get a more accurate estimation when comparing heavier to lighter individuals.

Just curious Mikael, why should a heavier individual have a stronger grip? You said a heavier individual should (assumption) have a stronger

grip. You did not say a heavier individual has (factual/objective) a stronger grip. Not being argumentative here either. Just trying to evaluate

your thinking here. Can you demonstrate why a heavier individual should have a stronger grip? Thanks in advance!

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Mikael Siversson

Let's look at grip athletes Joe, more specifically competing grip guys that look like athletes (as fat in itself does not generate force) and that have been doing grip for a long time; Matt Cannon, myself, Kody and Andrew Durniat. In overall grip strength (not in all individual events) we rank according to our size; the smallest is the 'weakest' and the largest is the strongest. At a given body shape a larger individual will be stronger, this is simple physics Joe as muscle strength increases by the square of a given increase in eg height. If you take eg Matt Cannon and increases his height by 10% (while maintaining his body shape) his muscle strength will go up by 1.10x1.10= 21% and his weight will go up by 1.1x1.1x1.1= 33%. This is not rocket science Joe.

A larger individual should have a stronger grip than a smaller individual. If he does not it means that he is somewhat of an evolutionary failure (climbing a tree would come in handy on an almost daily basis for early humanoids on the African savanna). Smaller individuals who outperform heavier opponents in grip strength do so because they are superior athletes, end of story. I reserve the right to remain unimpressed by athletes displaying very low grip strength to body weight ratios.

Lastly, there's an unproven assumption that just because an individual is larger in body weight that they

are automatically considered stronger. Not true. Why? Because there's smaller individuals performing greater

feats of grip strength than many of their heavier opponents.

I respect your right to believe whatever you like but the fact remains that it's an unproven assumption that

heavier (considering BW only) individuals should have stronger grips. Other factors would have to be considered

as well to get a more accurate estimation when comparing heavier to lighter individuals.

Just curious Mikael, why should a heavier individual have a stronger grip? You said a heavier individual should (assumption) have a stronger

grip. You did not say a heavier individual has (factual/objective) a stronger grip. Not being argumentative here either. Just trying to evaluate

your thinking here. Can you demonstrate why a heavier individual should have a stronger grip? Thanks in advance!

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Mikael,

Im on my phone so I'm not doing it, but go ahead and bulk yourself up and the other guys you specifically mentioned using your formula and let's pretend everyone is a heavy weight. Pick some lifts we all have in common and let's check out out.

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Or bulk down , say Nathan , and see if he could close the same grippers as you guys are doing.

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climber511

I gotta go with Mikael on this one. Every strength sport in the world has weight classes - and in each of those the heavier the stronger - with no exceptions over time - yeah the odd outlier but not over time. If you take those PL - OL - and Strongmen who have gained muscular BW through training - they all got stronger. Now sure you have to take out fat people - and untrained people to have any kind of comparison. But while grip has other factors that can come into play such as hand size and more mobile thumbs that gives real advantages to people in certain events - if we go with people equally trained - roughly equal in BF % - bigger certainly has the "potential" to be stronger in an overall manner and over time I think this will prove out. What we have with a sport as young as Grip is that many of the people who have been attracted to and excelled at grip have done so because they had natural advantages that allowed them to excel with out being as overall body big or strong enough for something like Strongman. Someone is always talking about how the Pro Strongmen etc will rewrite all the record books and that may be true - there are certainly some candidates with that potential.

Even when we look at the few guys like Eric who lost significant BW to compete in ONE contest it proves very little - he lost a bunch of BF (and no doubt some muscle mass) but he lost strength - not very much but some - and he admitted it was a very artificial weight that he could not hold for very long healthily. Yes his grip strength held up better than his overall strength but both dropped by a little. I think one thing that must be looked at is grip strength in an overall grip strength manner - this takes away some of the individual natural advantages discussed for certain events. Throw in everything and if all else is equal - the bigger people will come out on top.

At some point some events get so heavy that many "grip guys" can't even lift the weights involved - I've seen this already in Axle DL with several otherwise top shelf competitors. The specific training grip guys do is keeping them ahead for now - but I do not believe that will last. Even now - if we look at the Elite Total list - what are the sizes of those people?

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Mikael Siversson

I think you misunderstood me. It is not a magic formula of mine but simple physics. Muscle strength increase by the square and weight by the cube. As I explained this applies to a human scaled up (nothing that can happen in the real world of course). Take a robust individual say a 400lb strongman. If we scale down this individual by say 5% in one dimension (eg height) then his new strength will be 0.95x0.95 of the original level. This explains why a lean grip athlete of small stature will have a weaker grip than a taller larger framed and likewise lean athletes (given a large sample size). We can already see a pattern in the records list. There are outliers of course (aka Kody). Ask yourself, why are the top guys in the 59 to 74k class so hopelessly behind (in overall grip strength) the top guys in, say the 93k and 105k class?

Mikael,

Im on my phone so I'm not doing it, but go ahead and bulk yourself up and the other guys you specifically mentioned using your formula and let's pretend everyone is a heavy weight. Pick some lifts we all have in common and let's check out out.

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Mikael Siversson

Let's assume that we could somehow scale me up from 74k to 93k. 93/74=1.257. The cube root is 1.079. This means my height would increase from 182.5 cm to 197 cm and my grip strength would rise by 1.079x1.079= 1.164 (i.e., by 16.4%). Instead of having a 143lb 20 mmn gripper close (this is not quite my max) I would close a 166lb gripper, my Axle max would rise from 133k to 155k and my 2HP from 89k to 104k. My 1HP would be 54.7k.

By these numbers we can see, for example, that Kody is a better grip strength athlete than I am as my 93k scaled up me would still not beat him.

Mikael,

Im on my phone so I'm not doing it, but go ahead and bulk yourself up and the other guys you specifically mentioned using your formula and let's pretend everyone is a heavy weight. Pick some lifts we all have in common and let's check out out.

Edited by Mikael Siversson
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Mikael Siversson

Using Andrew would give the following result (if we scaled him down to 93k from 105k);

2HP 98.3k (indicating Andrew is significantly below me in the 2HP considering body weight)

Axle 196.1k (a whopping 40k above a scaled up me)

Gripper 190.5k (clearly above a scaled up me who would probably max out at 170-175lb given I am stronger in competition than I am in training)

In summary, at 74k I lift less in the big three than Andrew and Kody because I am smaller and because (all things being equal) I am less of a grip strength athlete than they are (as I would still lose overall if we were all scaled to 93k). I would possibly beat even Kody in the 1HP given that I am much stronger in competition than I am in training (and consistently high in the 1HP) but that is the only lift I might beat him in if scaled to 93k.

Edited by Mikael Siversson
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Mikael Siversson

Scaled up to 93k Eric's numbers would be (with 74k as a starting point Eric would, like me, be almost 2m tall):

20 mm gripper 182lb

Axle 181 k

2HP 105.7 k

Overall very competitive, emphasising his awesome performance at 74k.

The reason he cannot quite produce these numbers overall at 93k in real life is of course that he is not scaled up everywhere in real life (eg tendon diameter does not rise by 7.9 % etc.) and at 93k he probably carries a bit of fat (no offence Eric :) ).

Edited by Mikael Siversson
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bencrush

I reserve the right to remain unimpressed by athletes displaying very low grip strength to body weight ratios.

Boom! I haven't seen anything that will change my mind on this. But I'm open to the opposite. I'm not a "heavy hater." Or a "light hater." Think about the climbers or other light bodyweight guys who are always totally unimpressed when large guys can't do pullups. Or can't do many. Or can't do a lot of additional weight on a pullup. Because of their ponderous bodyweight. Well, I am unimpressed with a 130lb guy doing 20 pullups. Or 30. Or 40. Okay, 40 is pushing it for the impressive scale - for me. Just like the heavy, strong athlete SHOULD have a strong grip, the lighter athlete SHOULD be able to do a bunch of bodyweight pullups.

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Mikael What about things like lifting the blob , can a formula be used with hand size and bodyweight to see who is better at block weights?

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Let's look at grip athletes Joe, more specifically competing grip guys that look like athletes (as fat in itself does not generate force) and that have been doing grip for a long time; Matt Cannon, myself, Kody and Andrew Durniat. In overall grip strength (not in all individual events) we rank according to our size; the smallest is the 'weakest' and the largest is the strongest. At a given body shape a larger individual will be stronger, this is simple physics Joe as muscle strength increases by the square of a given increase in eg height. If you take eg Matt Cannon and increases his height by 10% (while maintaining his body shape) his muscle strength will go up by 1.10x1.10= 21% and his weight will go up by 1.1x1.1x1.1= 33%. This is not rocket science Joe.

A larger individual should have a stronger grip than a smaller individual. If he does not it means that he is somewhat of an evolutionary failure (climbing a tree would come in handy on an almost daily basis for early humanoids on the African savanna). Smaller individuals who outperform heavier opponents in grip strength do so because they are superior athletes, end of story. I reserve the right to remain unimpressed by athletes displaying very low grip strength to body weight ratios.

Lastly, there's an unproven assumption that just because an individual is larger in body weight that they

are automatically considered stronger. Not true. Why? Because there's smaller individuals performing greater

feats of grip strength than many of their heavier opponents.

I respect your right to believe whatever you like but the fact remains that it's an unproven assumption that

heavier (considering BW only) individuals should have stronger grips. Other factors would have to be considered

as well to get a more accurate estimation when comparing heavier to lighter individuals.

Just curious Mikael, why should a heavier individual have a stronger grip? You said a heavier individual should (assumption) have a stronger

grip. You did not say a heavier individual has (factual/objective) a stronger grip. Not being argumentative here either. Just trying to evaluate

your thinking here. Can you demonstrate why a heavier individual should have a stronger grip? Thanks in advance!

Thanks for your explanation Mikael! I assume your last comment about rocket science is your basically saying this

is not complicated. Correct! it's not complicated but it is quite complex and you failed to mention numerous factors

and just dismissed this as something so common that anyone should know this. You mentioned physics but left out

all the other relevant science behind this seemingly simple problem. Let's go over some things you didn't mention:

Neural efficiency. Muscle mass without the nervous system is like fat that produces no force. Muscle mass/body weight

alone is meaningless. The formula you used is all hypothetical and is more unreliable in real world circumstances than

reliable and again it's based on assumptions. Also you added in another factor that wasn't mentioned and that's height.

We are talking about body weight alone. Remember?

You are looking at this from "what's an impressive viewpoint" and not what's the limits of human potential. Example,

the current limit of human potential in strength is a 1015 lbs dead lift by a male human that weighed 382 lbs. the day he

lifted this world record weight. It doesn't matter what you weigh when you look at this from a human potential standpoint.

Impressive? To who? It's obvious that "impressive" is a subjective term and you and many others have proved this fact

well in this thread. What impresses you doesn't in the least impress the next guy. Who cares seems to be the norm here.

Lastly, because I'm out of time is if we where to go by your formulas you've used here then I could just as easily say

that what you or anyone else does at your body weight is not impressive but expected. Right? This is why I like to ask

myself what is the limits of human potential when it comes to strength. Grip strength specifically.

Factoid: The greatest feat of strength by a human to date is Benedikt Maganusson's 1015 lb DL! I don't see how anyone

could dispute this unless of course they are wanting their ego stroked because they could do the same feat if they weighed

the same body weight. All they have to do is gain the correct amount of weight and put up or shut up or go back to the

desk and dream and wonder about hypothetical math formulas that have no real life application because of all the other factors

excluded.

Here's a friendly challenge to you Mikael: Gain 100 pounds of body weight and perform the following:

Dead lift 800 lbs. on a standard olympic bar

2 HP 270 lbs.

Axle DL 500 lbs.

Close any COC 3.5 gripper with CCS straight out of the package.

Maybe this is being too hard on you so let's go with your formula you used here and those numbers will suffice.

Will I be impressed? Not according to your formula. It's what's expected hypothetically. You see my point now?

Keep us posted on your progress! :)

Edited by Mighty Joe
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Mike Sharkey

Saying they will rewrite all the grip strength records is like saying they will win the Gold Medal in the Olympics in the Snatch and C&J. Possible but until they actually show up and do it – meh……

That's the best thing I've heard all day. Put up or shut up. I'm really tired of hearing about how many people could do this or could do that. Did you do it? If not, be quiet until you do.

There are plenty of powerlifters who have as big or bigger squats than OLY athletes, but that doesn't mean they can C & J 270kg. Specificity definitely comes into play.

And are we talking about sport or just anything goes. Because if you talk about sport, you have to talk about weight class, period. I was just looking through the list of OLY WR's and its an interesting fact that there was not a SINGLE example of a WR in a lighter weight class beating a heavier weight class. Not one.

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Stephen Ruby

I don't have any facts on this but I don't think hand strength differs as greatly as say leg strength does depending on your body weight. The amount of muscle you can gain to your forearms is not very much and I believe most of grip strength is not really muscle based anyways. I will probably agree on average someone who is larger will have a slightly stronger grip assuming both are untrained.

I find it more fascinating that you have guys like joe kinney at around 170lbs closing a #4 gripper. While a HOF strongman like magnus samulson can only close the same gripper despite weighing over 100lbs more then he does. Joe would never lift the same weights as him at that bodyweight but he can close the same gripper-I also don't necessarily think him gaining a lot more weight would have him closing a much bigger gripper-. I think that is amazing more then trying to think that one is better then the other.

You can argue all day about who is better across weight classes, its fun and it happens in lots of sports. Yet I don't pay much attention to it I just judge what I see as impressive and take into context how common it is or not along with other variables involved. For the very competitive you can always judge yourself to those in your weight class, though the sport of grip is small in terms of sample size still I imagine with time you will see more guys under 200lbs doing some amazing grip feats.

Adam glass recently dropped to under 200lbs and he is still lifting huge things in terms of grip strength.

Edited by Stephen Ruby
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Josh O'Dell

Its not the dog in the fight its the fight in the dog...

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I think people over think things by trying to compare people across weight classes. I just try and get stronger. If I compete, I compete against my weight class. I don't try and cut weight. I weigh what I weigh. I never think of the weight I lift in terms of my body weight. I set goals for myself and attack them. This is for fun anyway. I'm not making money off it any time soon.

Its also impossible to predict how someone would do in another weight class. No formula can account for all the variables.

Edited by Chez
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Mikael Siversson

I am going to decline to address much of what you said as I regard it as nonsense (no offence of course). I am getting a bit old now but if I could travel back in time and feed myself a suitable 'cocktail' of you know what for a couple of years, an 800lb deadlift would not be totally unrealistic (I was ranked in the top 10 in IPF deadlift in Sweden 90k class for a while without using anything stronger than creatine). I have done 300k in the squat IPF depth without a squat suit (only belt and knee wraps) so maybe that can shut you up for awhile (I weighed 22-23 k more than I do today). In summary don't give me a lesson about being strong.

Let's look at grip athletes Joe, more specifically competing grip guys that look like athletes (as fat in itself does not generate force) and that have been doing grip for a long time; Matt Cannon, myself, Kody and Andrew Durniat. In overall grip strength (not in all individual events) we rank according to our size; the smallest is the 'weakest' and the largest is the strongest. At a given body shape a larger individual will be stronger, this is simple physics Joe as muscle strength increases by the square of a given increase in eg height. If you take eg Matt Cannon and increases his height by 10% (while maintaining his body shape) his muscle strength will go up by 1.10x1.10= 21% and his weight will go up by 1.1x1.1x1.1= 33%. This is not rocket science Joe.

A larger individual should have a stronger grip than a smaller individual. If he does not it means that he is somewhat of an evolutionary failure (climbing a tree would come in handy on an almost daily basis for early humanoids on the African savanna). Smaller individuals who outperform heavier opponents in grip strength do so because they are superior athletes, end of story. I reserve the right to remain unimpressed by athletes displaying very low grip strength to body weight ratios.


Lastly, there's an unproven assumption that just because an individual is larger in body weight that they
are automatically considered stronger. Not true. Why? Because there's smaller individuals performing greater
feats of grip strength than many of their heavier opponents.

I respect your right to believe whatever you like but the fact remains that it's an unproven assumption that
heavier (considering BW only) individuals should have stronger grips. Other factors would have to be considered
as well to get a more accurate estimation when comparing heavier to lighter individuals.

Just curious Mikael, why should a heavier individual have a stronger grip? You said a heavier individual should (assumption) have a stronger
grip. You did not say a heavier individual has (factual/objective) a stronger grip. Not being argumentative here either. Just trying to evaluate
your thinking here. Can you demonstrate why a heavier individual should have a stronger grip? Thanks in advance!

Thanks for your explanation Mikael! I assume your last comment about rocket science is your basically saying this

is not complicated. Correct! it's not complicated but it is quite complex and you failed to mention numerous factors

and just dismissed this as something so common that anyone should know this. You mentioned physics but left out

all the other relevant science behind this seemingly simple problem. Let's go over some things you didn't mention:

Neural efficiency. Muscle mass without the nervous system is like fat that produces no force. Muscle mass/body weight

alone is meaningless. The formula you used is all hypothetical and is more unreliable in real world circumstances than

reliable and again it's based on assumptions. Also you added in another factor that wasn't mentioned and that's height.

We are talking about body weight alone. Remember?

You are looking at this from "what's an impressive viewpoint" and not what's the limits of human potential. Example,

the current limit of human potential in strength is a 1015 lbs dead lift by a male human that weighed 382 lbs. the day he

lifted this world record weight. It doesn't matter what you weigh when you look at this from a human potential standpoint.

Impressive? To who? It's obvious that "impressive" is a subjective term and you and many others have proved this fact

well in this thread. What impresses you doesn't in the least impress the next guy. Who cares seems to be the norm here.

Lastly, because I'm out of time is if we where to go by your formulas you've used here then I could just as easily say

that what you or anyone else does at your body weight is not impressive but expected. Right? This is why I like to ask

myself what is the limits of human potential when it comes to strength. Grip strength specifically.

Factoid: The greatest feat of strength by a human to date is Benedikt Maganusson's 1015 lb DL! I don't see how anyone

could dispute this unless of course they are wanting their ego stroked because they could do the same feat if they weighed

the same body weight. All they have to do is gain the correct amount of weight and put up or shut up or go back to the

desk and dream and wonder about hypothetical math formulas that have no real life application because of all the other factors

excluded.

Here's a friendly challenge to you Mikael: Gain 100 pounds of body weight and perform the following:

Dead lift 800 lbs. on a standard olympic bar

2 HP 270 lbs.

Axle DL 500 lbs.

Close any COC 3.5 gripper with CCS straight out of the package.

Maybe this is being too hard on you so let's go with your formula you used here and those numbers will suffice.

Will I be impressed? Not according to your formula. It's what's expected hypothetically. You see my point now?

Keep us posted on your progress! :)

Edited by Mikael Siversson
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Lots of editing here lately

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  • 4 weeks later...
monstagripp

I always think someone coming out of the shadows makes a cool story. Hopefully it pans out.

In the meantime, here's a confirmed grip mutant...(with a rubberized 62.5)

If you are unfamiliar with this bizzaro blob...it's at Jedd's and has an insanely wide girth.

To this day, I've no idea how he got his hands around it (far shy from 10").

7qdc.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I have done something very similar but with both hands and I don't drop the weight. Good effort Jedd.

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monstagripp

I always think someone coming out of the shadows makes a cool story. Hopefully it pans out.

In the meantime, here's a confirmed grip mutant...(with a rubberized 62.5)

If you are unfamiliar with this bizzaro blob...it's at Jedd's and has an insanely wide girth.

To this day, I've no idea how he got his hands around it (far shy from 10").

7qdc.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I have done something very similar but with both hands and I don't drop the weight. Good effort Jedd.

Check out my channel on youtube monstagripp

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Alawadhi

When I visited the Stark center last year Dr. Terry Todd told me that he encouraged Mark Henry

to try and snatch the Inch DB and on the 3rd attempt he snatched it. I don't know if he's shared this

story with Richard or not but he told both me and my wife that he witnessed him do this in the hidden

room that's not open to the public where many, many vintage items are stored away at the Center.

For those that may not know. If Dr. Todd claimed he witnessed a strength feat and gives precise

details like he did. I believe it without question! The man is a true historian, weight lifting judge, and scholar.

If you are to ever meet Dr. Todd one thing becomes apparent rather quickly! The man knows all about

strength in any of its forms! He went on to encourage Mark to practice this feat over and over until he could consistently perform it and as you may or may not know, Mark Henry is not consistent at all when it comes to setting a goal and sticking with it. Does this make him a bad person? Absolutely not! It does make it frustrating for people like myself that know and realize what Mark could do with consistent, concentrated effort and practice.

Rather you choose to believe this account or not due to lack of a video keep in mind the generation that Dr. Todd came from. A time when most men could be taken for their word and a video camera was not needed nor a camera to snap a picture. Is video evidence better? Yes! Is it needed for an extremely credible witness like Dr. Todd? Not for me! There's very few individuals I would believe outside of video evidence but Dr. Todd is one of them as is Richard Sorin, Joe Roark, John Fair, Eric Milfeld, Bill Piche, and a few others.

Has the Thomas Inch ever been snatched with one hand? I believe it has indeed!

Which is more impressive and could go down as the single greatest grip feat of all time? Closing a legit COC #4 without a set or snatching the Thomas Inch? I would say closing a legit #4 without a set would edge out snatching the Inch. I believe this for several reasons but this is simply my opinion here. What do you think?

Joe- I have no doubt that Mark Henry can perform a snatch with the Inch dumbbell, but if he did this in front of Terry Todd at the Stark Center, then it was with a replica Inch dumbbell, not the original. This takes nothing away from Mark Henry's ability (I saw him clean and press a Sorinex Inch replica at the AOBS dinner over a decade ago and have it on video with Richard Sorin's comments as well), because he really does have one of the, if not the strongest grips in the world, but the Inch dumbbell never resided at the Stark Center.

You are correct. It was a Replica.

Brian Shaw is my favourite too !!

He's a gentle giant and is probably going to push all the strength boundaries known at the moment.

All factors considered here, you Mr. James are my current favorite!

mighty Joe

no disrespect at all but what Mr Todd saw can't prove anything. Yes Mark had the potential and everything but a video review is always better. Remember Sorin and his gym people? They all though Rich attempt was successful until they've reviewed the video. Because the human eyes can miss a thing or two out of excitement.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Gary Kessler

Like we needed a few more....but finished out the top row anvil storage area in the visitor grip area. Now the Anvil Chorus extends the full length of the rack! Moved another 800 lbs. of York globe dumbbells into the area as well. We moved additionaloverflow to some new storage area at production facility so plenty of good solid used barbell and grip equipment available for anyone swinging through the area. Thinking again about grip I wonder as I did with the first Blob ! just how heavy of a York globe dumbbell can be turned on end palmed pinch gripped and lifted? I think the lightest York Globe bell is a 50 so that will be a starting point. Ok......the big question ,can anyone find and successfully lift the 50 to get the ball rolling? Or is that even possible? Straight down grip no hooking fingers under bell or trying the 1000 ways to bypass gravity ......lets see what can be done!

Dave stopped by last night to lift the York 50# dumbbell; I am not sure if this was what Mr. Sorin was describing but Dave is willing to make changes and do it again.

IMG_1425.MOV

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anwnate

Like we needed a few more....but finished out the top row anvil storage area in the visitor grip area. Now the Anvil Chorus extends the full length of the rack! Moved another 800 lbs. of York globe dumbbells into the area as well. We moved additionaloverflow to some new storage area at production facility so plenty of good solid used barbell and grip equipment available for anyone swinging through the area. Thinking again about grip I wonder as I did with the first Blob ! just how heavy of a York globe dumbbell can be turned on end palmed pinch gripped and lifted? I think the lightest York Globe bell is a 50 so that will be a starting point. Ok......the big question ,can anyone find and successfully lift the 50 to get the ball rolling? Or is that even possible? Straight down grip no hooking fingers under bell or trying the 1000 ways to bypass gravity ......lets see what can be done!

Dave stopped by last night to lift the York 50# dumbbell; I am not sure if this was what Mr. Sorin was describing but Dave is willing to make changes and do it again.

Nice! Unfortunately few people have access to them. These Globes seem to go for a premium due to there scarcity. I'd like to see this lift (and additionally the half globe pinch lift) be added to the Gripboard Stat list.

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