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Anvil Horn Lift - Demonstration And Comparison Of Different Anvil Trai


Eric Roussin

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Eric Roussin

Inspired by some of the videos I've seen in recent in months, I decided to put together a video on anvil horn lifiting and related training devices. In the video below, I briefly demonstrate the lifts, give a few examples of how to train for it, and compare five anvil training devices: the Ironmind Little Big Horn (both the original and the newer version), the Gripper SuperStore Anvil Cone, the Sorinex Anvil Trainer, and World of Grip's HorneTop.

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excellant video. I love all the instrcutional stuff people have been putting together lately.

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Eric Roussin

Thanks guys.

A few things I wanted to mention during the video but forgot to:

  • The going rate for a used anvil in average condition weighing about 150-200 lbs seems to be about $300-$450 on sites like eBay.
  • Shipping costs can be very high.
  • If you live in Pennsylvania, you're in luck! I've noticed that a significant proportion of auctions for anvils on eBay originate in this state. You ay be able to pick up the anvil yourself to save some money.
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That video is pure gold!!! Thanks for sharing the information.

You're right, I don't see the GSS one offered anymore. Maybe Wade can comment.

I have often wondered about:

1.) Has anyone tried making their own trainer to get more of the oval shape to it?

2.) How does the harbor freight anvil compare? They sometimes sell a lighter one - around 55#'s I believe in some stores. They are usually sold a lot cheaper than the other professional ones.

3.) Are the shorter horn anvils harder to lift ( I would think so based on your comments about the slope of the cones on the trainers) ? I think the Peter Wright anvils tend to have a longer horn.

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Eric Roussin

Shorter horn anvils would be harder to lift, given the increased angle of the slope. However, must smaller horns are found on lighter anvils, so the difficulty of the lift is somewhat offset.

Of the different grip lifts, I think one of the ones that is most comparable is the 2 inch v-bar. If you can put up big numbers on this lift, you'd probably do well with anvils.

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I never really looked for anvils too hard. if a lot of them are in PA I guess I have to now.

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Nice video! I do have a personal set of oval cone anvil trainers but they were pricey to construct and hard to get materials. The anvil trainer we now produce does seem to be well received and used at many events. They are well loved in our gym. I do have a collection of a couple dozen anvils ranging from 91to 441 and the get tossed around on a regular basis. The original Jowett anvil resides at the Stark center museum in Texas at the moment. It is a Peter Wright anvil. It is very difficult to lift due to the grease saturated iron of the anvil . The Jowett anvil was kept in a wonderful gym that happened to be adjoining a BBQ returant and the thousands of then greasy hands saturated it over the years like a seasoned cast iron fry pan. I am so glad to see interest and insight into this great, novel way of testing and developing the grip. R. Sorin

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As a statistic I did see a vendor using our trainer as a contest item. The best I saw by anyone at those shows or in our facility is 205 lb total weight. I wonder what some of the grip monsters on the board can do?

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Mephistopholes

Cool video man! I love anvil horn lifting.

As a statistic I did see a vendor using our trainer as a contest item. The best I saw by anyone at those shows or in our facility is 205 lb total weight. I wonder what some of the grip monsters on the board can do?

I pulled 170 once (on my own trainer)... But mainly when I train with the anvil horn, I do it for carrying, not strict lifting. I want to get that old "10 steps to manhood" challenge down. Haha. What I've noticed however is that, unlike everything else, my left hand is stronger in this lift than my right. And I'm right handed. Anybody have any idea why this might be?

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Cool video man! I love anvil horn lifting.

As a statistic I did see a vendor using our trainer as a contest item. The best I saw by anyone at those shows or in our facility is 205 lb total weight. I wonder what some of the grip monsters on the board can do?

I pulled 170 once (on my own trainer)... But mainly when I train with the anvil horn, I do it for carrying, not strict lifting. I want to get that old "10 steps to manhood" challenge down. Haha. What I've noticed however is that, unlike everything else, my left hand is stronger in this lift than my right. And I'm right handed. Anybody have any idea why this might be?

Ok, I'll bite - what are the 10 steps to manhood? I googled it, and all I found was the urbandictionary version, which has nothing to do with anvils. :grin:

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Mephistopholes

Cool video man! I love anvil horn lifting.

As a statistic I did see a vendor using our trainer as a contest item. The best I saw by anyone at those shows or in our facility is 205 lb total weight. I wonder what some of the grip monsters on the board can do?

I pulled 170 once (on my own trainer)... But mainly when I train with the anvil horn, I do it for carrying, not strict lifting. I want to get that old "10 steps to manhood" challenge down. Haha. What I've noticed however is that, unlike everything else, my left hand is stronger in this lift than my right. And I'm right handed. Anybody have any idea why this might be?

Ok, I'll bite - what are the 10 steps to manhood? I googled it, and all I found was the urbandictionary version, which has nothing to do with anvils. :grin:

Hahaha I bet.

Well, I don't think there's really an official name for it, but that's what I call it. It's this old school blacksmith's challenge. The idea was for young guys to pick up the biggest anvil in the shop by the horn (I think this typically meant something about the size of the Jowett anvil, around 175lbs) and then walk 10 steps with it. If you could do this, then congratulations, you're a man.

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Eric Roussin

Yes, that's me. I still practice with Devon, though not as regularly as before. Consequently, I'm not present in many of the newer videos.

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Eric Roussin

Somewhere between 205 and 210 right now. I plan to post a video within the next few days as proof.

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Kashtan

As a statistic I did see a vendor using our trainer as a contest item. The best I saw by anyone at those shows or in our facility is 205 lb total weight. I wonder what some of the grip monsters on the board can do?

Mr. Sorin, Rich Williams how much lifted, and how much you?

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mightyjoe

Great video Eric!

For those that don't know Eric. He's a tremendous arm wrestler and competitor not to mention

he's a AW'ing historian to boot!

Thanks for sharing your knowledge Eric!

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Big Rich did about 200 to win a side contest at the Arnolds I think. There is a coach Pat Ivey a man that carried an Inch bell right at a 100 feet at a coaches show that also did what I recall 205. Rich probably could push that mark higher by perhaps 10% if he worked at it a bit. When I worked on the piece during developing it I did about 180. I found the trainer and a real anvil success to be very close poundage wise. Sorry for the estimated poundages but they are as close as I can recall. On big weights I always try to weigh the object as well.

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Big Rich did about 200 to win a side contest at the Arnolds I think. There is a coach Pat Ivey a man that carried an Inch bell right at a 100 feet at a coaches show that also did what I recall 205. Rich probably could push that mark higher by perhaps 10% if he worked at it a bit. When I worked on the piece during developing it I did about 180. I found the trainer and a real anvil success to be very close poundage wise. Sorry for the estimated poundages but they are as close as I can recall. On big weights I always try to weigh the object as well.

Great to hear some numbers and tips on this lift from your Mr. Sorin...Eric great vid, I may look into trying this historic lift some time

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Kashtan

Big Rich did about 200 to win a side contest at the Arnolds I think. There is a coach Pat Ivey a man that carried an Inch bell right at a 100 feet at a coaches show that also did what I recall 205. Rich probably could push that mark higher by perhaps 10% if he worked at it a bit. When I worked on the piece during developing it I did about 180. I found the trainer and a real anvil success to be very close poundage wise. Sorry for the estimated poundages but they are as close as I can recall. On big weights I always try to weigh the object as well.

Thanks Mr. Sorin.

205 - world record on this time?

Edited by Kashtan
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