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Injuries From Grip Training?


yummy

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I'm curious what kind of injuries any of you have got over the years from serious grip training-pinch,crush,bending,ext- I am new to grip training but want to try to be careful just curious if any of you have had injuries to your hands or wrists that have set you back. Are injuries inevetiable like with serious weightlifting in that if you want to get the big certs-or big weights- the chances of getting some type of injury are possible or have some of you done big grip strength feats through years of training with no injuries?

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lifesnotfair

I never even got strong in grip due to injuries. I was pinching 4 10#'s with both hands for reps, getting the 37.5# blob (tiny weak hands, I know), and I messed up BOTH thumbs pretty bad. It took MONTHS to heal, many many months. At a point I was scared of saying hello to another man, as giving a handshake was truly painful.

I know grip itself was not the issue. I think maybe I have weak/loose ligaments in my wrists or something. Who knows. Or I tried to do too much too fast. Next time I attempt to dedicate time to "grip" I'll just do Wrist movements for a few months before specific grip stuff, as a safety measure.

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I'm still pretty new myself; I haven't had any serious injuries, but I have strained my thumb pinching and a ligament that affected my thumb leveraging, which I think is why my thumb got strained from pinching. I also got really hooked on bending right away and was doing too many or too big of bends before parts of my hand were tough enough. I had to take awhile off, even bending 3/16 would hurt a little bit, but I realized that sort of pain was no good in any amount.

I wouldn't say injuries are necessarily inevitable, but from personal experience and other people's accounts, you almost definitely at some point will over-train and/or strain something. Learn what pain is good and what pain is bad. Taking an extra week off won't set you back, you might even be stronger when you return.

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climber511

The first day you start running - you don't do a marathon. I have for years now reccommended a sort of "break in program" before even starting on the grip specific stuff. But of course no one listens :wub: . The other thing I see all the time is way to much "testing" and not enough "training" - bending is famous for this. If you are new to the sport and don't build up gradually - what do you expect is going to happen?

Edited by climber511
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I'm still pretty new myself; I haven't had any serious injuries, but I have strained my thumb pinching and a ligament that affected my thumb leveraging, which I think is why my thumb got strained from pinching. I also got really hooked on bending right away and was doing too many or too big of bends before parts of my hand were tough enough. I had to take awhile off, even bending 3/16 would hurt a little bit, but I realized that sort of pain was no good in any amount.

I wouldn't say injuries are necessarily inevitable, but from personal experience and other people's accounts, you almost definitely at some point will over-train and/or strain something. Learn what pain is good and what pain is bad. Taking an extra week off won't set you back, you might even be stronger when you return.

Yeah I think reallizing what is normal soreness and what is pain is a big issue for people new to grip. Myself just working grippers for example started to feel some tendon soreness in the top part of my hand inbetween my fingers so been taking a break from them. I could easily see some people training through certain pains to where they get some real injuries so was curious if this has happened to other people. Notice now that both of you mentioned injuries from pinch training which is also interesting. Also I've developed new types of calluses in my hands despite weight training for years and working with my hands a lot which have taken time to heal also. Thanks for the feedback its good to see where people have gotten injuries to know maybe how to avoid them in the future and what types of exercises are more likely to cause them due to being more stressful or requring more technique.

I also feel like in any sport the importance of technique might go a lon ways in preventing injuries.

Edited by yummy
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The only serious injury I've sustained from Grip training was when I was trying to crush down a cut Edgin. My palm, down by my wrist hurt for months and it felt like I was being shocked when I extended my wrists with my arm bent. Just one more reason why I don't bend anymore. I've had the usual skin tears and aches and pains here and there but nothing that couldn't be solved with a week or so of rest and/or some rehab (sledge twists) but the bending is dangerous stuff.

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The first day you start running - you don't do a marathon. I have for years now reccommended a sort of "break in program" before even starting on the grip specific stuff. But of course no one listens :wub: . The other thing I see all the time is way to much "testing" and not enough "training" - bending is famous for this. If you are new to the sport and don't build up gradually - what do you expect is going to happen?

Not too slow and steady wins the race. If it kills stop (for a few weeks).

If it is a nag then keep going. Just pay attention to how you feel all the time.

This is a bit vague I know. If your hands really hurt all the time when you are not training then you need a big break. My hands nagged me a lot during RRBT and KTA but I could just tell it was not a true injury. In fact I was able to prow through and the problems went away. But they were not an intense pain that lasted too long after. They did nag a bit after. This not science BTW just instinct.

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The first day you start running - you don't do a marathon. I have for years now reccommended a sort of "break in program" before even starting on the grip specific stuff. But of course no one listens :wub: . The other thing I see all the time is way to much "testing" and not enough "training" - bending is famous for this. If you are new to the sport and don't build up gradually - what do you expect is going to happen?

Not too slow and steady wins the race. If it kills stop (for a few weeks).

If it is a nag then keep going. Just pay attention to how you feel all the time.

This is a bit vague I know. If your hands really hurt all the time when you are not training then you need a big break. My hands nagged me a lot during RRBT and KTA but I could just tell it was not a true injury. In fact I was able to prow through and the problems went away. But they were not an intense pain that lasted too long after. They did nag a bit after. This not science BTW just instinct.

this is huge and it goes for general weightlifting also though. I think this is really hard to understand at first though or when ego gets in the way and you want to progress badly.

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+1 slow & steady wins the race. Especially when it comes to new stuff, break in gently. After months of working my CoC #1, and #2, I tried inverted gripping my #1 and monkeyed up a knuckle in my left hand. It's fine now, but my left hand is not quite as strong as my right now.

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I got elbow tendinitis is BOTH elbows when I started doing sledgehammer rotations. The problem, as with most injuries, was that I did too much too soon. I was rotating for 3-5 rep maxes, often twice a week. And my grip strength got a lot better until I got tendinitis, after which it dropped off. So I'd strongly advocate the aforementioned "ease in" program for grip training in general, and always remember, even if you've been training for a while, you should ease in to anything that your body isn't used to doing. It's better to go too easy and realize you need to kick it up than it is to hurt yourself and take 2 months off.

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This has been said before, and is sometimes disputed, but doing extension work (i.e. bands) has always helped rehab and prevent injuries from getting worse for me.

Maybe it would be a good idea to have a general injury rehab/prevention topic pinned. There could be one on here that I've missed, so sorry if that's the case.

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The first day you start running - you don't do a marathon. I have for years now reccommended a sort of "break in program" before even starting on the grip specific stuff. But of course no one listens :wub: . The other thing I see all the time is way to much "testing" and not enough "training" - bending is famous for this. If you are new to the sport and don't build up gradually - what do you expect is going to happen?

:bow

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I never got truly injured although I was training grip quite intensively a few years ago. I got hurt from times to times and had to stop bending or training grippers for a few days/weeks, but nothing serious really. It has to be noted that i never got 'really strong' either!

Still i managed to get a decent grip (worked up to closing the #3 consistently and wasn't far from the red nail in IM pads for example) without injuries and with limited warm-up.

"The other thing I see all the time is way to much "testing" and not enough "training"" I can't agree more :)

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