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Jones1874

Will Your Hands Get Any Thicker From Grip Training.

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Jones1874

With the exception of the thumb pad, which i know people have said got thicker from pinch training, will the fingers / palm of the hands get a bit thicker.?

I havent been into grip training very long, and i plan on sticking to it regardless of whether my hands get thicker or not. just curious to whether the hands change much.

Thanks in advance.

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climber511

Yes they will over time.

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Cannon

I believe Climber, but so far the answer for me is "no". Might take a decade or more?

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Jones1874

I believe Climber, but so far the answer for me is "no". Might take a decade or more?

a decade! thats one seriously long wait.. Have your thumb pads grown much in the time youve been grip training? they come along faster dont they?

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iamsean11

With the exception of the thumb pad, which i know people have said got thicker from pinch training, will the fingers / palm of the hands get a bit thicker.?

I havent been into grip training very long, and i plan on sticking to it regardless of whether my hands get thicker or not. just curious to whether the hands change much.

Thanks in advance.

Is there a reason you want thick hands? Edited by iamsean11

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mt-tom

Mine have gotten thicker all over - fingers, palms, thumbs and thumb pads. I've been training grip for about 13 years. I can no longer get my wedding ring off because my ring finger has thickened around it. My hands are not freakishly large and thick, but my wife and kids noticed the change over time. I have, too.

Tom

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Jones1874

With the exception of the thumb pad, which i know people have said got thicker from pinch training, will the fingers / palm of the hands get a bit thicker.?

I havent been into grip training very long, and i plan on sticking to it regardless of whether my hands get thicker or not. just curious to whether the hands change much.

Thanks in advance.

Is there a reason you want thick hands?

it just looks more manly. thats not the reason im doing grip training though, i was just wondering if it was a byproduct of grip training because everyone who puts a vid seems to have blocks for hands.

im much more interested in getting them stronger, opposed to making them thicker.

Edited by alexjones234

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iamsean11

With the exception of the thumb pad, which i know people have said got thicker from pinch training, will the fingers / palm of the hands get a bit thicker.?

I havent been into grip training very long, and i plan on sticking to it regardless of whether my hands get thicker or not. just curious to whether the hands change much.

Thanks in advance.

Is there a reason you want thick hands?

it just looks more manly. thats not the reason im doing grip training though, i was just wondering if it was a byproduct of grip training because everyone who puts a vid seems to have blocks for hands.

im much more interested in getting them stronger, opposed to making them thicker.

Hand thickness is related to many factors: tissue volume growth, ligament volume growth, callusing of the skin, and also body weight.

Genetics is obviously the biggest factor. If you are naturally a bigger person, not necessarily fat, but just a big person, they tend to have larger hands. The body has mechanisms to stay in proportion, until you start messing with those by doing activities like lifting, or the opposite end of the spectrum, sitting on your butt and having an increase in body fat. That will give you very thick hands.

Depends on your body type. Ectomorphs respond to exercise 'stress' differently than endomorphs and mesomorphs. Some people can train for years and never gain an increase in muscle size, or bone density, etc.. while others can goto the gym and blow up from lifting.

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Cannon

I believe Climber, but so far the answer for me is "no". Might take a decade or more?

a decade! thats one seriously long wait.. Have your thumb pads grown much in the time youve been grip training? they come along faster dont they?

Nope, I can "flex" muscles in my hand somewhat that were not there before, but no noticeable thickness added.

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Magnus Gustafsson

Mine certainly did, and only in a few months. I wish I had before-and-after photos, the difference is very noticeable. When I started training grip I had what my wife called "surgeon's hands", they looked sissy. By the time I could close the #2 about 5 months later they had become "man's hands", again the words of my wife.

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iamsean11

Mine certainly did, and only in a few months. I wish I had before-and-after photos, the difference is very noticeable. When I started training grip I had what my wife called "surgeon's hands", they looked sissy. By the time I could close the #2 about 5 months later they had become "man's hands", again the words of my wife.

With a name like Magnus, I feel like you would have big hands anyways! Swedish I assume?

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mfin77

My fingers also grew. My wedding ring does not fit anymore.

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Magnus Gustafsson

With a name like Magnus, I feel like you would have big hands anyways! Swedish I assume?

Yup, and not the greatest ambassador for the name, heh (195 lbm, 5'11").

I imagine I'd look like a toddler next to Magnus Samuelsson.

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bwwm

Mine have gotten thicker. Thumb pad and the heel of my palm in particular. Also, I'm noticing the muscle between my thumb and pointer finger is larger and more defined. I don't think my fingers have changed in size.

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hellswindstaff

Wolfe's Law: tissue will adapt to the stress place upon it

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climber511

Atomic Athlete sells a book called 72 Consumate Arts of the Shaolin Temple or something like that It's simple but kind of neat. It gives a simple skill to wotk and then says something like - practice this for 30 years - great results will be achieved. Kind of hard for most people to wrap their head around but all this is for a life time. Slow down and enjoy the journey - I'm at 53 years with the weights and still learning what works for me - a decade isn't even a good start.

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Jones1874

Cheers for the replys lads. im just gonna crack on with my grip training and see what happens. thick hands arent really eye catching muscles like big traps, arms, chest etc .. so im not planning on putting in work for that sole purpose. I really want to get my crush grip up at the minute, and im gonna mess about with different pinch tools and see what i like most, then stick to that. stronger hands is one of my training priorities right now, the rest will follow, as they say.

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RTvG

Wolfe's Law: tissue will adapt to the stress place upon it

The best explanation for doing severe negatives, in only one sentence :)

RT.

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iamsean11

Wolfe's Law: tissue will adapt to the stress place upon it

The best explanation for doing severe negatives, in only one sentence :)

RT.

Many here will argue that point. Severe negatives can actually do more harm than good for a large majority of grip enthusiasts. If you are not a seasoned grip athlete the stress of severe negatives will deteriorate the tendon/ligament tissue beyond recovery and becomes tissue with slower progression. Also, recovery times will increase immensely, and catabolism will have a stronger balance during the 'recovery phase.'

Wolfes Law wasn't expressed with complete accuracy above. 'Adapt' isn't necessarily true. Depending on the direct stress of a system, a specific 'change' will happen, either good or bad, that is in correlation with the resulting disorder of internal structure.

The goal is to cause just enough stress to spark recovery in an anabolic state, but not to push the body so far into stress that the system will be down for a long time. (That is why professional body builders say to train for 45 minutes max per session because after that point muscle glycogen is depleted and you are doing more harm than good.) This is all proven biochemical topics.

Sean

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GatorGrip

Gripping and bending did make my hands thicker in a very short time, this was after a few months I also wish I had a before and after to show the drastic difference training made.

http://www.gripboard.com/index.php?app=galleryℑ=5428

Edited by GatorGrip

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Shoggoth

Hahaha! I love this! Another niche fascination of grip athletes. Thick, manly, sexy hands. I'm not saying I'm not guilty of this as well but to people that have no interest in this stuff how weird we must appear :D

(null)

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Randall Strossen

Yes, at least for some people: Joe Kinney said he outgrew his work gloves as he was training to close the Captains of Crush No. 4 gripper (did OJ Simpson's legal team give him a gripper to train on in jail?!).

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RTvG

Wolfe's Law: tissue will adapt to the stress place upon it

The best explanation for doing severe negatives, in only one sentence :)

RT.

Many here will argue that point. Severe negatives can actually do more harm than good for a large majority of grip enthusiasts. If you are not a seasoned grip athlete the stress of severe negatives will deteriorate the tendon/ligament tissue beyond recovery and becomes tissue with slower progression. Also, recovery times will increase immensely, and catabolism will have a stronger balance during the 'recovery phase.'

Wolfes Law wasn't expressed with complete accuracy above. 'Adapt' isn't necessarily true. Depending on the direct stress of a system, a specific 'change' will happen, either good or bad, that is in correlation with the resulting disorder of internal structure.

The goal is to cause just enough stress to spark recovery in an anabolic state, but not to push the body so far into stress that the system will be down for a long time. (That is why professional body builders say to train for 45 minutes max per session because after that point muscle glycogen is depleted and you are doing more harm than good.) This is all proven biochemical topics.

Sean

May be I should have left the "severe" out :)

Anyway, thanks for replying!

RT.

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bwwm
...did OJ Simpson's legal team give him a gripper to train on in jail?!).

Now that is funny!!! Maybe they gave him a TTK too?

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iamsean11

Hey maybe try some synthol injections in your hands.(just kidding) I am sure they will get thick and just massive.

:laugh Worlds biggest biceps ring a bell, anyone?

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