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Day #2 of High Volume - I have acheived what appears to be the biggest blister I have seen underneath one of my callouses on the middle of my finger. Crap.

Edited by Dude
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Pattaya! That's where I live, well, actually I live in Jomtien which is app 3 Km south of Pattaya. I've been here for about 10 years now. First 5 years on Soi 12 in Pattaya and since then 5 years on Soi 5 in Jomtien. Do you scuba dive? Maybe you've heard of Moose Divers (former Scuba Moose) thats my shop. I opened 7,5 years ago, before that I worked for Dolphin Diving Center on Soi Post Office in Pattaya.

Where in Pattaya did you stay? How long time ago was it?

Regarding "average Joe's" strength I'm not impressed. I took my grippers to my local hang out, The Other Place, it's also the meetingplace for one of the local biker clubs "The mad Dog".The half dussin guys that where there tried my grippers and only one guy could close #1 the rest could barely close the Trainer!! You should have seen the look of their faces when they tried #3 :D

Moderator Edit: Please use the PM or email options to exchange personal information to questions not related to training. Thanks

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One thing that is important to doing this high volume would be to have enough grippers to gradually increase the intensity (difficulty of the gripper) while decreasing the reps. This is a peaking type of routine. This will be difficult to do if you are going for the #2. Perhaps a supergripper would help you to gradually increase the difficulty as I am reasonably sure you do not have a bunch of grippers inbetween a #1 and a #2. perhaps filing your #1 a little each week will gradually give you the changes you need, maybe 1/8" at a time.

Greg

Edited by gamidon
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One thing that is important to doing this high volume would be to have enough grippers to gradually increase the intensity (difficulty of the gripper) while decreasing the reps.  This is a peaking type of routine.  This will be difficult to do if you are going for the #2.  Perhaps a supergripper would help you to gradually increase the difficulty as I am reasonably sure you do not have a bunch of grippers inbetween a #1 and a #2.  perhaps filing your #1 a little each week will gradually give you the changes you need, maybe 1/8" at a time.

Greg

You're right, I only have two very easy grippers and IM Trainer, #1 and #2. I've been thinking about ordering some more grippers but the problem is that the customs personal are the most corrupt in the world. They keep most stuff sent here and you have to pay an "extra tax" (read bribe them) to get your stuff. I'm not interested in paying twice for anything! I'm going back to Sweden in a month or two and I will get some new grippers then.

What do you veterans think would be the most accurate grippers? I've been thinking about Robert Baraban's grippers, nice small increments, not like the IMs grippers. Whatabout the BeefBuilders? If you have to choose, what grippers would you take, RB or BB?

Claes

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Personally I love Beefbuilder grippers. You can literally get a gripper of any strength you want if you know how handle spread and depth of mounting the spring effects the gripper. Then again, its about $10 extra if you want it custom made.

Even the standard grippers are great tho, I would go with BB's.

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One thing that is important to doing this high volume would be to have enough grippers to gradually increase the intensity (difficulty of the gripper) while decreasing the reps.  This is a peaking type of routine.  This will be difficult to do if you are going for the #2.  Perhaps a supergripper would help you to gradually increase the difficulty as I am reasonably sure you do not have a bunch of grippers inbetween a #1 and a #2.  perhaps filing your #1 a little each week will gradually give you the changes you need, maybe 1/8" at a time.

Greg

Good point. This is why I'm gonna do a cycle of KTA to get my strength back up on the grippers, and then do the high volume routine. This routine is pure genius if you ask me, because its like a mini periodization program.

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While doing high volume which part of your hand hurts the most from the knurling? For me it's the little finger. Everything else is fine. Am I holding the gripper the best way possible if it puts so much stress on the little fingers?

Thanks,

Karl

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you can get a decent spread of grippers to do this with even if yer not yet on the #2

i started on with a sports authority gripper that i can rep like 120

next moved onto a hg100, then a trainer, then a hg150, then a #1, then a hg200 for my max gripper, then i did negs on a hg250

of course the prob with the hg grippers is their variance, so yours may not fall in order like mine did

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you can get a decent spread of grippers to do this with even if yer not yet on the #2

i started on with a sports authority gripper that i can rep like 120

next moved onto a hg100, then a trainer, then a hg150, then a #1, then a hg200 for my max gripper, then i did negs on a hg250

of course the prob with the hg grippers is their variance, so yours may not fall in order like mine did

That sounds perfect. I think that is plenty of grippers in that range. I had not considered the HG grippers in the mix but they are inexpensive and do round out the lower range. Another option is to add in the guide and sport. I had forgot about those too.

Greg

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  • 3 weeks later...

After doing some research last night I discovered even more reasons why this type of program may be successful.

1) The obvious one is that its a periodization program, or rather a mini periodization program since the gripper being used is changed each week, which increases intensity and naturally decreases the amount of reps that can be done.

2) High rep training can increase capillary density. This is taken straight from an article at t-nation.com: "Studies have shown that sets of more than 20 reps can increase capillary density, and capillary dense muscle can eventually lead to hypertrophy when one resumes more traditional rep schemes." This last part shows that the week of negatives at the end of this program is especially beneficial after all the high rep work.

3) High rep training strengthens the tendons and ligaments more so than low rep training. "Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development." 3 sets of 30 reps or 1 set of 100 reps was more effective at strengthening the tendons and ligaments than lower rep training.

Edited by Vice
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supermagnamon
After doing some research last night I discovered even more reasons why this type of program may be successful.

1)  The obvious one is that its a periodization program, or rather a mini periodization program since the gripper being used is changed each week, which increases intensity and naturally decreases the amount of reps that can be done.

2)  High rep training can increase capillary density.  This is taken straight from an article at t-nation.com: "Studies have shown that sets of more than 20 reps can increase capillary density, and capillary dense muscle can eventually lead to hypertrophy when one resumes more traditional rep schemes."  This last part shows that the week of negatives at the end of this program is especially beneficial after all the high rep work.

3)  High rep training strengthens the tendons and ligaments more so than low rep training.  "Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development."  3 sets of 30 reps or 1 set of 100 reps was more effective at strengthening the tendons and ligaments than lower rep training.

interesting. u got me thinking now, as well. :online

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After doing some research last night I discovered even more reasons why this type of program may be successful.

1)  The obvious one is that its a periodization program, or rather a mini periodization program since the gripper being used is changed each week, which increases intensity and naturally decreases the amount of reps that can be done.

2)  High rep training can increase capillary density.  This is taken straight from an article at t-nation.com: "Studies have shown that sets of more than 20 reps can increase capillary density, and capillary dense muscle can eventually lead to hypertrophy when one resumes more traditional rep schemes."  This last part shows that the week of negatives at the end of this program is especially beneficial after all the high rep work.

3)  High rep training strengthens the tendons and ligaments more so than low rep training.  "Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development."  3 sets of 30 reps or 1 set of 100 reps was more effective at strengthening the tendons and ligaments than lower rep training.

Vice,

Thanks for finding this..now I am even more convinced about my current workout regiment!

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After doing some research last night I discovered even more reasons why this type of program may be successful.

1)  The obvious one is that its a periodization program, or rather a mini periodization program since the gripper being used is changed each week, which increases intensity and naturally decreases the amount of reps that can be done.

2)  High rep training can increase capillary density.  This is taken straight from an article at t-nation.com: "Studies have shown that sets of more than 20 reps can increase capillary density, and capillary dense muscle can eventually lead to hypertrophy when one resumes more traditional rep schemes."  This last part shows that the week of negatives at the end of this program is especially beneficial after all the high rep work.

3)  High rep training strengthens the tendons and ligaments more so than low rep training.  "Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development."  3 sets of 30 reps or 1 set of 100 reps was more effective at strengthening the tendons and ligaments than lower rep training.

That is a really good post. This is why it is structured the way it is as a periodized routine adapted from a russian type of program. I have been working on adding a plyometric type activity to the routine as well. I have a choker that holds a HG250 to 1.25" I then explode into it and release it fast. This mimics the explosiveness of the plyometric activities that are listed in the Science of Strength Training (Zatsiorsky). I really

like the theories in this type of training and used them to come up with this routine. Most of the people who have tried this or a offshoot of it have reported success.

I DO NOT reccommend it for beginners. I recommend you do a lot less volume and not going to heavy too soon. You have to be at a point where you are no longer making reasonable gains and your hands are capable of handling the loads this puts on you. Too often beginners move to fast, it isnt worth it. Beginners will get huge gains right off the start anyway so run with those while you are adapting to the stresses.

KTA and this can really do wonders, if you have been doing KTA for a while and you switch to this, when you go back to KTA your hands will not know what hit them....

Greg

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Vice, that was very very interesting.  What is your reference for point #3?

The reference for point #3 is from an article at dragondoor.com. It stated that there were two ways to strengthen the tendons and ligaments.

The 1st way is to support really heavy weights "More than you can lift normally... this will strengthen your ligaments, your tendons and you'll get more strength out of that than you would if you were just doing flexing exercises."

The 2nd way is to use high reps, "Although heavy supports in the tradition of Jowett, Anderson, and Grimek are a must for a serious iron athlete, they are only half the connective tissue training equation. Full amplitude high rep work is recommended by Eastern European specialists to stimulate tendon and ligament development. Kurz (1994) prescribes 3x30 or 1x100-200."

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