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Tns Vs No-set Vs Set


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Gluteus Maximus

:mellow Maybe the challenge of a No-set for someone with smaller hands is a blessing in disguise.

:blush I think everything really is relative with regards to the hand size issue. My hands are @8.5; but some of the guys I train with have much larger hands than mine, and I've always thought of them as being average. These guys are sometimes larger in general (some of them real genetic freaks) and I've found myself having to overcome this by just squeezing harder [and wider] when we compete with each other in training. When I compete with guys my own weight class things get much easier.

This brings me to my point:

If it is stronger, more effective hands we are looking for; I think in most cases, the smaller man can, and should overcome this difference by being that much proportionally stronger.

Instead of expecting the same benefit of having a large 'sweet spot', he has the burden (and maybe blessing) of expanding his range of optimum output to compensate. I believe, in the end, this will turn out to be better for him. With this specialized strength being used for other tasks [within his bio-mechanical range] he will have a much easier time. :mellow

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:mellow Maybe the challenge of a No-set for someone with smaller hands is a blessing in disguise.

:blush I think everything really is relative with regards to the hand size issue. My hands are @8.5; but some of the guys I train with have much larger hands than mine, and I've always thought of them as being average. These guys are sometimes larger in general (some of them real genetic freaks) and I've found myself having to overcome this by just squeezing harder [and wider] when we compete with each other in training. When I compete with guys my own weight class things get much easier.

This brings me to my point:

If it is stronger, more effective hands we are looking for; I think in most cases, the smaller man can, and should overcome this difference by being that much proportionally stronger.

Instead of expecting the same benefit of having a large 'sweet spot', he has the burden (and maybe blessing) of expanding his range of optimum output to compensate. I believe, in the end, this will turn out to be better for him. With this specialized strength being used for other tasks [within his bio-mechanical range] he will have a much easier time. :mellow

If the smaller handed man is competing against himself: sure, but if in competition with others (grip contests, MM certs, etc..) then he shouldn't hamstring himself trying to no-set a gripper that's too wide for him.

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Gluteus Maximus
:mellow Maybe the challenge of a No-set for someone with smaller hands is a blessing in disguise.

:blush I think everything really is relative with regards to the hand size issue. My hands are @8.5; but some of the guys I train with have much larger hands than mine, and I've always thought of them as being average. These guys are sometimes larger in general (some of them real genetic freaks) and I've found myself having to overcome this by just squeezing harder [and wider] when we compete with each other in training. When I compete with guys my own weight class things get much easier.

This brings me to my point:

If it is stronger, more effective hands we are looking for; I think in most cases, the smaller man can, and should overcome this difference by being that much proportionally stronger.

Instead of expecting the same benefit of having a large 'sweet spot', he has the burden (and maybe blessing) of expanding his range of optimum output to compensate. I believe, in the end, this will turn out to be better for him. With this specialized strength being used for other tasks [within his bio-mechanical range] he will have a much easier time. :mellow

If the smaller handed man is competing against himself: sure, but if in competition with others (grip contests, MM certs, etc..) then he shouldn't hamstring himself trying to no-set a gripper that's too wide for him.

I understand what your saying, and I know your focus is on formal grip competition; but I still think what I'm saying may apply.

Think of people like Brookfield and Sorin. Both men do not have particularly large hands, but perform [and out perform] feats also attempted by larger handed men. They've found a way to pass the obstacle.

I saw a picture of Sorin closing a #3 with two of his fingers. If his hands were smaller than they are now [or, just born with two fingers], I believe he would still be able to close the gripper. Brookfield seems like the type to eventually pinch grip the thing if he had to.

If a man with 4" hands was able to perform the same work [however he had to] on a gripper, it would leave him better suited to still compete in the 'real world' with a man of larger hands. More is expected of him in both arenas. There are eventual limits, I understand, but in general I always try to think of unbalanced odds as some hidden blessing to a strong willed person.

If Sorin or Brookfield were born with larger hands, and didn't have to work as hard to perform the same work- on grippers, just for example; maybe they wouldn't have developed the same mastery they exhibit today. :unsure

:mellow Just a thought.

Edited by Gluteus Maximus
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Matt Brouse

Might have missed this point discretely in some post before but...

So there is a school of though out there that states that by doing work on the gripper with a "set", one can improve the strength of the full movement?

Has anyone worked in this manner? As in worked mostly with no-sets but then trained with sets and found great benefit?

So basically, I train mostly with single, negs, and finger variations, would it be advantagious to incorporate some set closes, is what I am asking? Perhaps to get reps on a higher gripper?

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The hardest part of closing the gripper is always the last 1/4 or so.

So doing set work to achieve closing that gap is beneficial to your ability to close a gripper even if you mostly want to train no sets.

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Matt Brouse

Yeah, thats one of those things that seem obvious once you sit and think about it...the last inch or so being the hardest part.

:blush

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I think everyone should be able to set the gripper to the point that the last part of the pinky finger is perpendicular to the plane of the two gripper handles. It seems that would take into account the same relative range of motion no matter what size hands you have or what the spread of the gripper is. There! I have now solved all the problems in the world, at least until one of you points out where I may be wrong.

With all the .02 worth this thread is getting pretty expensive!

Karl

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LAHotSauce

I never knew closing a handgripper could be so technical and open to debate!! :blink

I'm impressed!

I could probably earn a mill if I wrote a book and explained all the different ways, techniques, sets, and finger wriggling methods used to close a gripper and made it just a little less detailed than aerospace engineering.

:bow

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Gluteus Maximus

:unsure I hope we don't get so wrapped up in the device that we forget why it was invented in the first place.

I read the MOHS [brookfield] book. I like his approach. There's nothing wrong with defining terms and stuff- as long as you end up with really, really strong hands.

I've been reading about the "Hammerman" guy on the web. Right up my alley. :D His style seems pretty nice too. Hammers are the key to happiness. :happy

Sets look to be great for training the ROM they entail; but for proving: I think all variables fall aside when you see somebody bend steel, or break something.

My impression of grippers was that of a 'means' to an end. A tool. Not the end itself. Isn't that right? :unsure

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True, the objective of many here is to close cert grippers. The grippers are also used to demonstrate handstrength. On top of that grippers are a collectible item. As far as handstrength gained is concerned, it is mainly useful for closing grippers.

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Gluteus Maximus

:( Mr Ass?

You don't like my username, or something? Am I to meet you in the school parking lot after football practice? :cry

Is my opinion unexceptable? I thought it was well thought, and well intended.Do you have something to contribue besides "For some but not for others, Mr. Ass?" Why was my opinion so special among these five pages?

My keyboard almost shed a tear. You are, by the way, sitting at a computer- aren't you?

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Gluteus Maximus
True, the objective of many here is to close cert grippers.  The grippers are also used to demonstrate handstrength. On top of that grippers are a collectible item. As far as handstrength gained is concerned, it is mainly useful for closing grippers.

That's cool.

These grippers are new to me, and I never knew there was such a genre' built up around it. That's a lot better than some other things people do [no offense to 'curling' or table tennis fans.] I think it's great there's such a way to motivate people to train hard.

I've always liked the idea of strong hands, and have been training mine for years. Hey man, I've got nothing against anybody's opinion. No offense, but I don't really care that much. :happy I assumed the thread asked for member input- hope mine was well taken.

Edited by Gluteus Maximus
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Rick Browne
True, the objective of many here is to close cert grippers.  The grippers are also used to demonstrate handstrength. On top of that grippers are a collectible item. As far as handstrength gained is concerned, it is mainly useful for closing grippers.

That's cool.

These grippers are new to me, and I never knew there was such a genre' built up around it. That's a lot better than some other things people do [no offense to 'curling' or table tennis fans.] I think it's great there's such a way to motivate people to train hard.

I've always liked the idea of strong hands, and have been training mine for years. Hey man, I've got nothing against anybody's opinion. No offense, but I don't really care that much. :happy I assumed the thread asked for member input- hope mine was well taken.

With the user name you have, you seem to come off as a goof.

(No personal attack intended.) Just can not take you seriously.

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Gluteus Maximus

Believe me, I am anything but a "Goof."

I have the confidence to take myself lightly. There are lots of funny names here.

Is there a certain clic here? Has there been more chatter than I've seen in posts? I did go to middle school, you know. :happy

Bro. We are members of an internet chatroom about grip. :blink I didn't expect to be defending Gotham city against evildoers. :D

I've got a lot of experience with training all kinds of stuff. That should be a good thing, man. I'm a happy, positive person- I leave the nasty stuff for work. When I write something- It's from the heart. Take it that way.

Thanks for the heads up.

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Gluteous maximus is the ass. It is far easier to say ass than gluteous maximus. To put Mr in front of ass is just showing respect! True gluteous maximus sounds more like a Roman Emporer.

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Gluteus Maximus
Gluteous maximus is the ass. It is far easier to say ass than gluteous maximus. To put Mr in front of ass is just showing respect! True gluteous maximus sounds more like a Roman Emporer.

:D I get it, I get it.

True story:I was actually going to just say 'Maximus' for the username. When I told my woman what I was doing [joining a grip chat] she added the 'Gluteus' part. I just went with it.

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