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Number Of Reps To Gain Stegth On Coc Grippers


Jeremy Sipple

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Okay, so let me say this. Usually I can do a full 10 sqeezes, and not sure how many on the second set with #1, I cannot fully squeeze the #2 if I already did sets on the #1. Therefore should I do negatives with the #2?

A negetive is taking a gripper that you cannot close with one hand and force closing it and fighting the opening for as long as possible.  This way you only perform the negetive portion of the close.

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Okay, so let me say this.  Usually I can do a full 10 sqeezes, and not sure how many on the second set with #1, I cannot fully squeeze the #2 if I already did sets on the #1.  Therefore should I do negatives with the #2?

Yes, do negatives with your #2. And don't do a long warmup.

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I say forget the reps!

For me; singles, and deep set single attemps on a gripper i cannot quite close has proven to be the most effective way to train.

With a deep set i mean 1" and below,basically i just set it as deep as i can and squeeze like hell for a few seconds, and then i cheat closes it with a little help from my other hand and try to resist it opening up for a few seconds.

When you can close your goal gripper with a deep set you can begin to gradually increase the setting width.

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After months of "repping out" on the #1 in order to move up to the #2, I just started doing negatives with the #2.

I hit a PR of 4 closes right handed and one close left handed the other night. Negatives work great for me, reps didn't!!

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After months of "repping out" on the #1 in order to move up to the #2, I just started doing negatives with the #2.

I hit a PR of 4 closes right handed and one close left handed the other night. Negatives work great for me, reps didn't!!

But personally, I find the powerball and doing reps with the #1 (for it's easy for me now, for others that may be the Trainer) a good way to wake up your forearm and hand. Then set a goal, about 4 to 10 negatives on each hand as long as you can. Do cheat holds to close it, and hold on tight.

I am changing my routine constantly after reading here, and while I hear KTA program is great, I also read a lot about people progressing w/out KTA and just doing negatives and nothing else. In the end, the only thing I found consistent is reps do nothing. I think that is not necessarily true, just an exagaration. I think reps help, but so little that the improvement takes way to long.

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Matt Van Weele

Listen to snott. He knows his stuff. You could however take a chance and try a few things and see for yourself what works for you. Just don't get hurt.

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Listen to snott. He knows his stuff. You could however take a chance and try a few things and see for yourself what works for you. Just don't get hurt.

Matt,

Thanks for the vote of confidence in me! It means a lot coming from you.

Matt has it right - try both and see what works for you. I've told people in the past that reps really don't work using the grippers and are a waste. Some guys like to do reps anyways - go figure. :dry

I'll do reps on a grip machine, but I don't do them on the grippers.

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Bearcat 74

John Wood uses a ton of reps to train grippers. He knows what he doing, how to progress and he is disiplined. He also has some of the strongest hands around too. Go figure........

You need to find what works for you. Experiment until you find something that works.

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Unbelievable levels of grip strength can be developed on high reps or low reps ... you just have to know how to do it right. I would also like to add that what I do is by no means "high volume."

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Okay, I have to ask. What is the difference between doing reps on a gripper vs. the machine, other than you can increase the weight on a machine? You can do the same thing in a similar fashion by going to a harder gripper as if you were to add weight to a machine.

Listen to snott. He knows his stuff. You could however take a chance and try a few things and see for yourself what works for you. Just don't get hurt.

Matt,

Thanks for the vote of confidence in me! It means a lot coming from you.

Matt has it right - try both and see what works for you. I've told people in the past that reps really don't work using the grippers and are a waste. Some guys like to do reps anyways - go figure. :dry

I'll do reps on a grip machine, but I don't do them on the grippers.

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Rick Browne
Okay, I have to ask.  What is the difference between doing reps on a gripper vs. the machine, other than you can increase the weight on a machine?  You can do the same thing in a similar fashion by going to a harder gripper as if you were to add weight to a machine.
Listen to snott. He knows his stuff. You could however take a chance and try a few things and see for yourself what works for you. Just don't get hurt.

Matt,

Thanks for the vote of confidence in me! It means a lot coming from you.

Matt has it right - try both and see what works for you. I've told people in the past that reps really don't work using the grippers and are a waste. Some guys like to do reps anyways - go figure. :dry

I'll do reps on a grip machine, but I don't do them on the grippers.

My thoughts are ...You can microload a machine and continually progress; as for a gripper going up in loads, to wide of a gap in strength of the springs

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John Wood uses a ton of reps to train grippers.  He knows what he doing, how to progress and he is disiplined.  He also has some of the strongest hands around too.  Go figure........

What works for John Wood is what works for John Wood. But wait a minute....

You need to find what works for you.  Experiment until you find something that works.

Oh. That's what you should of said at the beginning! Go figure! :dry

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Bearcat 74
John Wood uses a ton of reps to train grippers.  He knows what he doing, how to progress and he is disiplined.  He also has some of the strongest hands around too.  Go figure........

What works for John Wood is what works for John Wood. But wait a minute....

You need to find what works for you.  Experiment until you find something that works.
Oh. That's what you should of said at the beginning! Go figure! :dry

I really don't know why I am wasting my time with a response to you, but:

Why would that matter where I said it? Your advice to every new person on here is do negatives and singles. WOW, that's quality stuff! Since I should have said find what works for you in the beginning, and since you are the all mighty know it all of grip, what were your first two posts? Your first one was full of good info, catch the sarcasm there? The 2nd one, was do negatives. Then you come back with an actual answer of try things for yourself. We are in awe of your presence. :bow

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stratavarious_connection

My experience with progress, in summary , echos both of what Heath and J. Wood have posted- experimentation, low volume , and also high / low reps. The only thing I will add to that is moderate frequency.....which has us coming back full-circle to experimentation.

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You need to find what works for you.  Experiment until you find something that works.

Experimenting and finding out what works for you are both very important, theres no question about that. However, you can spend a heck of a lot of time experimenting and a heck of a lot of time trying to find out what works and all you will have to show for it is frustration and a lot of wasted time.

The fact of the matter is that, sure, experimenting will work, high reps will work, low reps will work, doing negatives will work all of these will work provided THAT you have a system of understanding what components about that specific training style are working.

For example, take negatives... where do you start? You could do 10, you could do 1, you could do easy ones, you could do hard ones, you could do them every day, you could do them once a week...

Of the infinitely many ways you can incorporate negatives into your program, only a handful are worth a damn. But hey, just keep experimenting, maybe youll be lucky and run into one by accident.

Just adding negatives to your program isnt going to get you anywhere unless you understand why they should be added or what your trying to accomplish with them when you do.

Seeing as how we know exactly how the human body reacts to certain types of stress this is not particlularly hard to do when a systematic approach is in place.

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Matt has it right - try both and see what works for you.

Heath - did you read this?? I did. I also said that it's my belief that reps are a waste of time and effort on the grippers. Some guys like to do them anyways. I can't stop that. Again it goes back to - experiment.

I only discovered negatives when it seemed like everything else I tried DIDN'T WORK, and working the negatives did.

So chill out, dude! I never said I had all the answers. :rolleyes

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Matt Van Weele

Snott you say some guys do reps and you can't stop that. I know Heath mentioned the John Wood does a lot of rep work. He also told me that he prefers more than what might be average reps. Would you try to talk a guy like him into training different? I have also talked to a guy who use to train guys and had plenty of them with unreal grips. He also mentioned high reps were a staple in the grip department. Sometimes as many as 100 in a single set. Maybe your the one who doesn't know how to train.

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Of the infinitely many ways you can incorporate negatives into your program, only a handful are worth a damn. But hey, just keep experimenting, maybe youll be lucky and run into one by accident.

Just adding negatives to your program isnt going to get you anywhere unless you understand why they should be added or what your trying to accomplish with them when you do.

Seeing as how we know exactly how the human body reacts to certain types of stress this is not particlularly hard to do when a systematic approach is in place.

John, could you go into more detail on how you believe negatives can be incorporated into a grip program effectively? (edit: given that one's goal is closing a more difficult gripper).

Edited by mANVIL
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combinacation of the imformation and I have read what works and what does

not. Successfull grippertest and those who are successfull.

Each person response to exercise differenely but what is working for you.

Rep are good to test your PR.

KTA program works for most people.

Start with the KTA program and give everything in the program.

It is only $20.

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Matt,

That is a very complex subject and needs to be discussed in detail for it to be done right. I'll tell you what I'll do, when I get some time, likely toward the end of January(maybe later though), I will put together a "negatives" only grip training teleseminar in which I will cover workout design, different "negative" workout techniques/exercises, how to incorporate negatives into your workout and some other good stuff.

If anyone is interested in this type of thing, shoot an email to Karen at info@functionalhandstrength.com and let her know so we can mark your name down. When the time comes, we'll need to know how many spots to reserve.

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I posted what I did about negatives because he says he has been trying to add reps and his gains are slow. I know for me, repping didn't work well, or not as well as I wanted.

When I was working on closing the #2, I was doing negatives with the #3. When closing the #3, negatives with the #4. I think any time someone on the board asks for training advice, it should be assumed that all training styles presented may not work for them, without having to put up a disclaimer. When I see these threads asking for advice, I just post what has worked for me.

In my opinion, bickering over training styles will only cause people to stop replying to posts asking for training advice. Just my .02

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