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Calibrated Fat Bastard Stocks


EricMilfeld
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Grade 2 (5/16") are fun since they help you break the barrier of 5/16" steel. Together with 1/4" grade 8's and square they are the perfect stuff to unlock reds and bastards.

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When was the last time the shiny was calibrated? I'm pretty sure that the 545 result was at least from 1.5 years ago. Has it been calibrated again after that?

After finding a pile that was from a year ago. I do have to say that I suspect that the new ones are easier

Don't know how I missed this one from back in... APRIL! :whistel

Yes, 545 was from the original batch several years ago. A recent batch hit 420 or 440. I forget which. Mike K could tell you.

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When was the last time the shiny was calibrated? I'm pretty sure that the 545 result was at least from 1.5 years ago. Has it been calibrated again after that?

After finding a pile that was from a year ago. I do have to say that I suspect that the new ones are easier

Don't know how I missed this one from back in... APRIL! :whistel

Yes, 545 was from the original batch several years ago. A recent batch hit 420 or 440. I forget which. Mike K could tell you.

Don't worry about it. I found out eventually. The hard way, with a cert I didn't think that I could back up :blush

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How hard is the current batch of shinys?

Tim

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  • 8 months later...

Well, I just ordered some shinys and if they come in at 420, I will have shiny bastard in everyway before bastard in everyway! That would be crazy, I will have to cert the DO, which I never did, still I should be able to reverse that! We will see, I guess.

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  • 1 year later...

When was the last time the shiny was calibrated? I'm pretty sure that the 545 result was at least from 1.5 years ago. Has it been calibrated again after that?

After finding a pile that was from a year ago. I do have to say that I suspect that the new ones are easier

The new ones are disappointing. I have some old shinys left somewhere if someone needs a few.

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  • 8 years later...
On 9/22/2004 at 1:36 AM, EricMilfeld said:

The following calibrations were attained by loading weight from the middle of the stock, with the upward force being applied 3/4" in from each end of the stock, bending to 30 degrees.

I think the only truly meaninful comparisons of the various stocks are those of the same length. For example, a 7" piece of the 5/16" round can be compared to any other stock of 7" with a high degree of accuracy. But on the other hand, a 6" grade 8's calibration rating may not necessarily reflect how tough the grade 8 is to bend, relative to a 5" piece of some other type of stock.

Following is a list of how various pieces of 7" stock compares to the 5/16" round stock. This round stock is assigned a 100% strength rating.

3/16" round=24%

3/16" square=36%

1/4" round=55%

1/4" square=86%

Red (shiny)=91%

Red (dull) =94%

5/16" hexagonal=110%

5/16" stainless round=124%

5/16" grd 5 (triangle)=128%

5/16" grd 8 (triangle)=156%

5/16" square=160%

3/8" round=167%

Following is a list like the above, only using 6" lengths.

3/16" round=23%

"OF" 1/4" bolt=35%

3/16" square=35%

"307A" 5/16" bolt=51%

1/4" round=51%

grd 5 bolt=63%

grd 8 bolt=77%

1/4" square=81%

grd 9 bolt=81%

5/16" hexagonal=113%

5/16" stainless round=119%

And finally we have a list of all the various poundage ratings for nearly all of John Beatty's stock, as well as the 6" grade 9 bolt. For a few of the tougher pieces it simply wasn't practical for me to calibrate them.

3/16" ROUND

7"=105

6"=135

5.5"=160

5"=195

"OF" 1/4x6" Bolt=210

"BL" 1/4x6" Bolt=200

"HKT" 1/4x5.5" Bolt=285

3/16" SQUARE

7"=160

6"=210

1/4" ROUND

7"=240

6"=305

5.5"=365

5"=425

1/4x7" hexagonal=255

"307A" 5/16x6" Bolt=305

60D Keystone=315

"S30400" (stainless) 5/16x6" Bolt=485

GRADE 5 BOLTS

6"=375

5.5"=445

5"=515

"TRIANGLE" BLACK GRADE 5 BOLT

6"=385

"JH" BLACK GRADE 5 BOLTS

6"=405

5.5"=485

GRADE 8 BOLTS

6"=460

5.5"=525

"L9" GRADE 9 BOLT

6"=485

F-911 BOLT

6"=535

1/4" SQUARE

7"=380

6"=485

5.5"=565

5"=660

5/16" ROUND

7"=440 (batch from February '07 = 385) (batch from April '07 = 450), 420, 430, 515

6.5"=510

6"=600 (batch from February '07 = 510), 655

5.5"=695

5/16" HEXAGONAL

7"=485, 530, 535

6.5"=565, 590

6"=675, 705

5/16" STAINLESS ROUND

7"=545

6.5"=625

6"=715, 700

3/8" BRASS ROUND

7"=480

6.5"=530

6"=600

5.5"=720

5/16x6" "BJC" bolt=545

5/16x6" Grade 5 (triangle)=745, 715

5/16x6" Grade 5 "linear S"=745

5/16x6" Grade 5 "W.T"=715

5/16x6" Grade 5 "NB"=710

5/16x6" Grade 5 "JH" "FNL"=685

5/16x6" Grade 5 "TY" "FNL"=665

5/16x7" Steel Works HRS=380

3/8x7" 307A "JG" bolt=485

3/8x7" "CLM" galvanized bolt=500

3/8x7" "HKT" bolt=515

3/8x7" 307A "CYI" bolt=520

3/8x7" "BXC" bolt=535

5/16x7" Grade 5 (triangle)=565, 565, 565, 585, 540

3/8x7" 307A "DF" bolt=575, 595, 610

3/8x7" Steel Works HRS=590

3/8x7" Steel Works CRS=590, 570, 615

3/8x7" "BL" bolt=620

5/16x7" Grade 8 (triangle)=685, 675, 675, 665, 685

5/16x7" FBBC Stainless Square=595, 23 degrees with 835

5/16x7" Square=705

3/8x7" Round (King of All Bastards)=735, 665, 660, 655, 645, 635, 780

3/8x7" Stainless Steel (King of All Shiny Bastards)=820

70D Grip Rite (made in China)=285

70D Keystone=375

70D Grip Rite (made in USA)=475

FBBC SPIKES

12"=290

10"=400

GRIP RITE GALVANIZED SPIKES

12"=225

10"=330

Note: The relatively high degree of accuracy these readings reflect can be observed when you note that all 1/2" increments with a particular stock represent about a 15% strength increase.

@EricMilfeld it was very interesting reading this old post. You put a lot of work into this. Really good job. Is this the first time steel was ever calibrated? How did you come up with the technique you used?

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19 hours ago, Donc101 said:

@EricMilfeld it was very interesting reading this old post. You put a lot of work into this. Really good job. Is this the first time steel was ever calibrated? How did you come up with the technique you used?

Thank you. Looking over this, even I’m surprised by how much work I put into it. 

I was the first to rate steel this way by attaching clips to the stock and thigh-lifting it with a handle. A couple of other guys, including David Horne, had did something similar by simply grasping the ends of the steel with their hands. My focus was for standardization, accuracy, and repeatability. Of course over the years following this post I calibrated mounds of steel. People would send me stuff from all over the world. It was loads of fun for me!

Edited by EricMilfeld
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