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David Horne Is In The Grip Well!


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#1 OFFLINE   Wannagrip

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 04:41 PM

Remember, questions only to David.

 

Thanks in advance to David for being in the well!

 

Here is a BIO on David: 

 

Born in Johnstone, Scotland in 1962, David Horne is a long-standing and well-respected member of the burgeoning grip community. He has been involved in strength sports both as a competitor and a coach for over twenty-five years, winning many notable titles (please see details below). David is responsible for the introduction and development of a number of popular grip events; he is founder, chief designer and managing director of the company World of Grip and is widely considered an authority on all matters related to hand strength.

 

Major titles won:

World’s Strongest Hands 2010, 2011

Champion of Champion Grip Champion 2005

European Grip Champion 2004

British Grip Champion 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2012, 2013.

Britain’s Strongest Hands 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

British Armwrestling Champion 2001

International All-Round Weightlifting Champion 95kg class (3 times) 1990, 91, 92

British All-Round Weightlifting Champion 95kg class (4 times) 1990, 91, 92, 93

Winner of Steve Gardner’s Strongman Series 1991

 

Strength sports participated in:

Tug of War (1986-87)

Armwrestling (1988-89, 1993, 1999-02, 2005, 2008-)

Strongman (1989-1992)

All-Round Weightlifting (1989-95)

Powerlifting (1989)

Grip Contests (1991-)

Strandpulling (1993)


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#2 OFFLINE   Mike Sharkey

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 05:00 PM

WOOT



#3 OFFLINE   wojo

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 06:35 PM

Hi David,

 

I have a few questions for you....

 

What adjustments have you made in your training (both barbell training and grip) with regards to frequency, intensity, mobility, recovery, etc. over the past 10 years or so as you've moved from your 30's through your 40's and into your 50's?

 

What are some exercises that come to mind that you feel offer the most bang for your buck for developing a great base for grip strength?  Are there certain exercises that you feel are under-utilized in people's programs?

 

How would you like to see the sport of grip progress over the next 10 years?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

John W.


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#4 OFFLINE   Tom Scibelli

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:14 PM

Thanks for doing this David.

 

1. What's your favorite aspect of grip to train and why?

 

2. Can you give any history about the circumstances which led to some of your famous grip inventions (e.g. the Euro, Vulcan, WD etc)?

 

3.  What does a typical week of training look like for you now?

 

Thanks.  -Tom


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#5 OFFLINE   Mike Sharkey

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:27 PM

Hi David,

 

Thanks for taking the time to do this.  

 

I have a few questions.

 

1.  You are well known for both bending and grip.  I know that it can be difficult to make progress in multiple areas at once.  Speaking as someone who has gone from the former to the latter, I was hoping you could comment on how you organize your training, and, more specifically, what types of hand work interfere with each other.  I.e, do you not train grippers and thickbar together, and do you cycle training, perhaps blobs for a month, then grippers, or have you found away to progress in multiple areas.

 

2.  Do you have any overall general tips for thickbar improvement?  Will using a variety of widths speed progress (especially as someone without larger hands)?  Have you noticed carryover from Axle work to RT and vice versa

 

3.  For beginning work,  2HP or a Saxon Bar if you could only have one?  (Yes haha I know you invented the 2HP!)

 

4.  Can you give some tips for improved hubbing technique?  I am at around 55# on an IM Hub and adding weight has proved difficult. I would like to be able to pull some plates off the floor.  Is there real carryover between the two?

 

5.  When working to improve on blobs, do you find adding more weight to blocks you can lift, or going to wider blobs you might need to iso more productive.

 

6.  Could you name a couple feats that you are most proud of in bending and in grip.

 

 

 

Thank you again!

 

Mike


Edited by Mike Sharkey, 04 November 2013 - 07:28 PM.

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#6 OFFLINE   truth1ness

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 08:05 PM

You're a big proponent of barbell finger curls. Do you recommend dragging the bar over your thighs to simulate the friction you'd get in a deadlift or keep the bar free hanging? 



#7 OFFLINE   jvance

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 08:17 PM

David, I have a great deal of respect for what you've done to put grip sport on the map globally. How do you see the sport's growth currently versus years past. Is it on an upward trend? What advice would you give for newer guys like me that don't have have a great deal of equipment or experience - but want the sport to grow. Thanks very much in advance.
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#8 OFFLINE   David Mitti

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 08:32 PM

Hi David,

I currently use the WD as a warm up before reverse bending.

1) For reverse bending being the main focus how should the WD be used to get me the best results.
Example -Very slow to mimic the slowness of a real bend,or explosive hits.
Low reps moving to max hits or more volume at lower levels.



I am currently after a 2-45's pinch and have stalled out horribly on this task.
My best being a 35&45 plate pinch.
I usually do no more than 5 reps per plate combo working up to my max with two training days a week and with other various pinching.

2)What do you believe are crucial training methods with 1Hand plate pinching that lead you to pinch the 45's plus...

Thank you for your time.
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#9 OFFLINE   Electron

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 10:09 PM

David, thanks for your commitment to the sport.

 

I have a few questions that have been in my mind.

 

1. Elizabeth is a very accomplished woman, but can you tell me how strong she was when you began with her training?

What are some of her biggest accomplishments in grip, and what was your methodology behind the training?

 

2. It is well known that Baraban sells a product very similar to yours, as do a few lesser known Asian companies.

What is your view on this, any hard feelings or is this all fair in the name of widening the sport?

 

3. You are very inventive. What is your most proud invention in grip or otherwise, and what were the needs it was aimed to answer?

 

Thanks!



#10 OFFLINE   John McCarter

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 10:22 PM

I was hoping you could answer this question, as the topic of the Vulcan has come up in a number of post.

 

Before you invented the Vulcan, how did the idea for the Vulcan Gripper come about and what was the thing that got you started to make it a reality?



#11 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 12:25 AM

Crikey, I'm impressed by how many questions! Haha
I'll answer them later on.
But some great questions.
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#12 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 02:37 AM

John,

Q - What adjustments have you made in your training (both barbell training and grip) with regards to frequency, intensity, mobility, recovery, etc. over the past 10 years or so as you've moved from your 30's through your 40's and into your 50's?

A - Quite a few actually. In that period of time I have had shoulder and elbow surgery, with the shoulder surgery being successful. The elbow however is quite a problem, and my arm will not straighten by quite a bit. Anyway, both of these problems had me change things over time. A few exercises and feats are gone forever, and others are adapted.

Right now I train 6 or 7 times a week (have always trained on volume anyway), and the session takes about an hour. This includes grip and body exercises, and of course the programme changes every 12 or 16 weeks.

I have always found that I recover well from this kind of training with areas getting trained at different times.

The main thing is to 'read' your body language and your training.
Leave the ego well behind.
Drop exercises that hurt 'bad'.
You will not get stronger being injured.

Q - What are some exercises that come to mind that you feel offer the most bang for your buck for developing a great base for grip strength? Are there certain exercises that you feel are under-utilized in people's programs?

A - Your training should always be geared towards the 'Goal'. Short term (12-16 weeks), and long term (1 year). So the bang-for-buck exercise may alter, depending on these goals, and your weak areas.
But I suppose I have always thought that Pinch work is near the top. I actually believe that (skin protected) Pinch holds to be incredibly effective. I guess wrist work is the under-utilised area, and I have always trained this area. Remember that wrist training doesn't have to be heavy.

Q - How would you like to see the sport of grip progress over the next 10 years?

A - I suppose I see what is developing in Britain right now. We already have a lot of events lined up around Britain next year at strongman, and armwrestling clubs. We also have the sport of grip in the World Alternative Games too.

It is down to people to take the sport to these different areas, and I am hoping that I will get a few events in at climbing, martial arts and crossfit clubs too.


Hi David,
 
I have a few questions for you....
 
What adjustments have you made in your training (both barbell training and grip) with regards to frequency, intensity, mobility, recovery, etc. over the past 10 years or so as you've moved from your 30's through your 40's and into your 50's?
 
What are some exercises that come to mind that you feel offer the most bang for your buck for developing a great base for grip strength?  Are there certain exercises that you feel are under-utilized in people's programs?
 
How would you like to see the sport of grip progress over the next 10 years?
 
Thanks in advance!
 
John W.



#13 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 02:58 AM

Tom,
No probs, glad to help out.

Q - What's your favorite aspect of grip to train and why?

A - This can change depending on my goals. Something that is a real challenge can sometimes be a massive focus for me. But I do enjoy Pinch, Wrist and grippers too. In fact anything that doesn't hurt 'bad', but I do love a 'pump' session.

Q - Can you give any history about the circumstances which led to some of your famous grip inventions (e.g. the Euro, Vulcan, WD etc)?

A - The Two Hands Pinch Lift had been used in grip contests since 1991, and usually sat at 50mm width. But of course in the early 2000s it became apparent that different widths would suit some people and not others depending on hand size. So in 2004 I designed the Adjustable Pinch apparatus, and got the prototype built, and that was that. The first contest to use it was the 2004 British Grip Champs.

I designed the Vulcan one morning in 2007, while Elizabeth was out shopping. I wanted to do more gripper training, but have a gripper that you could slowly increase the resistance. I made a model of the Vulcan out of a cereal box, and when Elizabeth got back she found the pivot point for me.

With the Wrist Developer (also 2007) I wanted a tool to 'train' the area without having to purchase huge amounts of steel. We sell a lot of these; and they are not just a tool for Reverse Bending, as many folks buy them who just want to train on it, and we usually guide them to have the orange spring on it.

Q - What does a typical week of training look like for you now?

Like I said in John's answer, about 6-7 days training, one hour sessions. The programme changes depending on my goals, etc. My current programme is:
Mon - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Tue - Pinch, light back
Wed - Biceps, Lat, wrist
Thu - Pinch
Fri - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Sat - Legs, Back, Pinch
Sun - Biceps, Lat, wrist

Thanks for doing this David.
 
1. What's your favorite aspect of grip to train and why?
 
2. Can you give any history about the circumstances which led to some of your famous grip inventions (e.g. the Euro, Vulcan, WD etc)?
 
3.  What does a typical week of training look like for you now?
 
Thanks.  -Tom



#14 OFFLINE   PeterSweden

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 04:54 AM



Mon - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Tue - Pinch, light back
Wed - Biceps, Lat, wrist
Thu - Pinch
Fri - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Sat - Legs, Back, Pinch
Sun - Biceps, Lat, wrist

 

You train grip before regular body training?

I've always heard that you fire up that CNS and get the blood flowing for better grip results if you train grip last :) You disagree?



#15 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:19 AM

Mike,
Thanks for the questions.

Q - You are well known for both bending and grip. I know that it can be difficult to make progress in multiple areas at once. Speaking as someone who has gone from the former to the latter, I was hoping you could comment on how you organize your training, and, more specifically, what types of hand work interfere with each other. I.e, do you not train grippers and thickbar together, and do you cycle training, perhaps blobs for a month, then grippers, or have you found a way to progress in multiple areas.

A - I have done many strength sports at the same time, such as armwrestling and strongman, and yes bending and various hand exercises can be tough to train together. But when you know this, then you will accept the results. If you want to do multiple things, realise this and work hard, and find a way.

Armwrestling certainly has a bigger effect on grip training than bending, there is nothing like it on the tendons.

As for bending I have been lucky/unlucky enough to have not done much Double overhand or underhand. These two styles are responsible for more shoulder problems (especially DO), than any other steel bending. With the problems I have had in my shoulder, DO would be a massive mistake. So I stick to Reverse, which of course is great for wrist strength. I get no problems incorporating it into any program.

How the program is fashioned, depends on the goals. Then I shape the technical work, assistance work, and the different training. No two programmes are the same, and I have all my training diaries to look through and find tips, etc.

I honestly nowadays don't find a problem with any exercises. I train 7 days a week, so exercises are carefully positioned in the programme. But when you start week 1 of the programme, be aware that you may have to alter things as you go along. A programme is not set in stone!


Q - Do you have any overall general tips for thickbar improvement? Will using a variety of widths speed progress (especially as someone without larger hands)? Have you noticed carryover from Axle work to RT and vice versa

A - Thick bar is too general. To improve on say the Inch, you have to train on the Inch, and the assistance exercises. This technical and strength training is important. As for training with the Rolling Thunder to gain Axle strength, this would be a mistake. After 12 weeks you could be a bit better at RT, and no different or weaker on the Axle.

Remember one person's thick bar is another person's thin-bar.
One point would be to remember that fingertips, and wrist are as important in thick-bar as the thumb!

Q - For beginning work, 2HP or a Saxon Bar if you could only have one? (Yes haha I know you invented the 2HP!)

A - I'd opt for the 2HP, because it's a competitive event. Plus I can make it to whatever thickness I want.

Q - Can you give some tips for improved hubbing technique? I am at around 55# on an IM Hub and adding weight has proved difficult. I would like to be able to pull some plates off the floor. Is there real carryover between the two?

A - There are better Hub Lifters out there than me. In fact in Finland there are great Hub lifters, with super technical ability. They have been doing these small lifts, and holds for many years under the promoter Kimmo Kokko.

My thoughts on it is (regardless of technique), is to do workload on the event. Holds, holds, holds! Also work on the Shallow Hub and the other Hubs will feel easy after.

Q - When working to improve on blobs, do you find adding more weight to blocks you can lift, or going to wider blobs you might need to iso more productive.

A - If you make the Blob wider, you alter the event. Stick with Holds, or adding weight very slowly, before going to a different item. Also on a Blob you cannot lift, use the slide method of sliding the Blob. I have this all covered in Vol 2 of Gripopaedia. You can find it in my shop. That book is 61 pages, so it's got a lot in.

Q - Could you name a couple feats that you are most proud of in bending and in grip.

A - I'm always more pleased or proud of a contest performance, and how I did all-round.
But I suppose if I am pushed, and off the top of my head.
In steel bending - snapping an IronMind ‘Red’ – 25 Feb 2008 – Stafford, England.
IronMind wraps were used for protection only. This snap was part of a ‘constant circuit’ in which two other tasks were performed, these being the Vulcan Hand Gripper, and a Rear Lever. The snap started with a 29 degree bend ‘Reverse style’, then braced to close. It was then bent back & forth for 18 rounds unbraced till it was snapped at 1 hour 23 min 40 secs. This was quite a test of mental strength!

In grip - At the time I did every world record I was pleased. But now I have one I want to do, and if I do this next year it will be my proudest feat of grip strength!


Hi David,
 
Thanks for taking the time to do this.  
 
I have a few questions.
 
1.  You are well known for both bending and grip.  I know that it can be difficult to make progress in multiple areas at once.  Speaking as someone who has gone from the former to the latter, I was hoping you could comment on how you organize your training, and, more specifically, what types of hand work interfere with each other.  I.e, do you not train grippers and thickbar together, and do you cycle training, perhaps blobs for a month, then grippers, or have you found away to progress in multiple areas.
 
2.  Do you have any overall general tips for thickbar improvement?  Will using a variety of widths speed progress (especially as someone without larger hands)?  Have you noticed carryover from Axle work to RT and vice versa
 
3.  For beginning work,  2HP or a Saxon Bar if you could only have one?  (Yes haha I know you invented the 2HP!)
 
4.  Can you give some tips for improved hubbing technique?  I am at around 55# on an IM Hub and adding weight has proved difficult. I would like to be able to pull some plates off the floor.  Is there real carryover between the two?
 
5.  When working to improve on blobs, do you find adding more weight to blocks you can lift, or going to wider blobs you might need to iso more productive.
 
6.  Could you name a couple feats that you are most proud of in bending and in grip.
 
 
 
Thank you again!
 
Mike



#16 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:25 AM

I look on training as manual work, of which I did for many years as a landscaper. I should be able to train at anytime, and on whatever. I used to graft for 8-10 hours, and then go to the gym.

It varies to where the exercises can be, as it really doesn't matter to me. On a contest day the events will be there in whatever order, etc.

But I like to put my technical work first.
As for body exercises, I will usually Deadlift first, but I always Squat last. Just how I operate.

Mon - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Tue - Pinch, light back
Wed - Biceps, Lat, wrist
Thu - Pinch
Fri - Gripper, Chest, Tri, Shoulders
Sat - Legs, Back, Pinch
Sun - Biceps, Lat, wrist
 
You train grip before regular body training?
I've always heard that you fire up that CNS and get the blood flowing for better grip results if you train grip last :) You disagree?



#17 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:28 AM

Guys, give me your real name when asking a question.
Okay - cheers.

I only really started doing work on grippers in the early 2000s, prior to this work was with weighted events.

Finger curls area good way to work crushing. Keep the exercise strict, and work on reps too.
It's just such an un-technical event, compared to grippers.

Keep the bar away from your thighs.


You're a big proponent of barbell finger curls. Do you recommend dragging the bar over your thighs to simulate the friction you'd get in a deadlift or keep the bar free hanging?



#18 OFFLINE   David Horne

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:36 AM

J, is this John?

Many thanks for your kind comment. We try, but so do plenty of others, and as I said above small underground sports grow by 'getting out there', and this is what we are trying to.

I'd love to run a manual-workers comp. Guys who have never stepped foot in a gym. I've seen guys in the past, in fact my dad was one.

The sport is growing, but only time will tell.
If you take the sport to normal untrained people in the street, and this is what we are trying, and Kimmo has done in Finland for years, the events need to be un-technical, quick, easy. This is why holds are great. The contest can be done and dusted in 30 mins.

You can help if you wish. You only need three events, calibrated scale or done at the post office for free. Maybe your local fair, etc. It all starts with people helping, and becoming promoters. I can help you if you wish to help.


David, I have a great deal of respect for what you've done to put grip sport on the map globally. How do you see the sport's growth currently versus years past. Is it on an upward trend? What advice would you give for newer guys like me that don't have have a great deal of equipment or experience - but want the sport to grow. Thanks very much in advance.



#19 OFFLINE   Mephistopholes

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 06:26 AM

David,
Thank you so much for doing this. I have a couple questions for now, but may have more eventually...

1) I've messed with finger lifting on and off, but have not really found a "best" way to do it. So what do you think? What sort of equipment is best to use, a barbell, an axle, something like the Ironmind Eagle Loops? And how about the finger combinations? Two-handed, one-handed, all fingers at once, or one or two at a time?

2) I've dabbled with trying to train more than one grip event in a workout, but that never seems to go anywhere, so I'm back to just doing one event per workout. Naturally, this limits what I can do to like 4 Events. I love doing thickbar, but I don't want to neglect pinch. So if right now I'm using and Inch Trainer on one day, a super-wide pinch device on another day, and two other days are grippers and finger lifts... So the question is, do you think my thumbs are getting worked enough right now, or do I need a more specific "medium-width" pinch event in there?

Thanks,

Bobby

#20 OFFLINE   Anthony C.

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 06:26 AM

David,

Thank you for doing this. Moreso than anything, i'm focused on training for longevity. I am concerned about the effects grip training can have on the hands over the long term. How have you been able to avoid conditions like arthritis as you continue to train hard into your fifties? Are there any particularly harsh grip activities which you feel can cause more harm than good to the body over the long term?

Thank you,
Anthony
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