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Gripper Programming For Adjustable Grippers?


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#1 OFFLINE   truth1ness

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:39 AM

So I've been doing barbell rollups and pinching (from the beginner FAQ program) to build up a bit of strength base and have just been haphazardly squeezing an Ivanko super gripper adjustable gripper to start with grippers, basically doing something like 3x10 3x/week like the instruction sheet recommended. I'd like to start on a formal gripper program and was looking at maybe RRBT which seems to be well liked here. I'm not interested in closing TSG's at this point, just building up a strength base particularly for weightlifting grip and getting my tendons strong, though I'd like to get as high as I can with my ISG closes. Based on my goal and me using an adjustable gripper instead of TSG's which most programs seem to be based on I have a few questions on what I should do regarding a program: 

 

1) I assume RRBT and most gripper programs mentioned here were designed for fixed torsion spring grippers like COC's where there are big jumps between resistances (and variable resistance in the close). Since my ISG has small increments (and a flatter resistance curve) would a fixed gripper based program like RRBT make any sense for someone like me with an adjustable extension spring Ivanko gripper (or similarly a Vulcan or other adjustable gripper)? Would it make sense to follow some kind of simpler more linear program because of the small increments available and pick up RRBT later only after I start hitting plateaus and need more complex programming? And if so what would you recommend? 

 

2) Has anyone come out with a gripper program specifically for Vulcan/Ivanko adjustable style grippers? What are those of you training mainly with Vulcans or ISG's doing? 

 

3) Are the exercises in RRBT all done on the gripper? Or does it lay out thumb/pinch/extensor/block/thickbar/other accessory training to do alongside with the grippers? Am I responsible for continuing to do other training to round out my gripper training or am I supposed to only focus on grippers while running the program? In other words is it something that replaces my entire grip routine or something I plug in just for the gripper portion? 

 

 



#2 OFFLINE   climber511

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:39 AM

Grippers aren't really that much different than anything else.  A progressive resistance program of your choosing will work just fine.  No program is perfect for everyone.  One person needs reps - another singles.  Most of us do best with some combination of high and low reps plus singles and perhaps negatives down the road.  Really only you are in a position to figure out what works best for you.  Keep a good log of what you do - stay the course if you are making progress - change things up if you are not.

 

PS I feel the ISG is very good for more general strength gains with the more parallel handles - TSGs need to be trained as a skill as much as a strength builder. 


Edited by climber511, 14 September 2013 - 09:41 AM.


#3 OFFLINE   truth1ness

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 11:07 AM

Grippers aren't really that much different than anything else.  A progressive resistance program of your choosing will work just fine.  No program is perfect for everyone.  One person needs reps - another singles.  Most of us do best with some combination of high and low reps plus singles and perhaps negatives down the road.  Really only you are in a position to figure out what works best for you.  Keep a good log of what you do - stay the course if you are making progress - change things up if you are not.

 

PS I feel the ISG is very good for more general strength gains with the more parallel handles - TSGs need to be trained as a skill as much as a strength builder. 

 

Thanks Climber, I actually chose the ISG based on your comment about them in my other post about the general strength and more parallel handles. I really like it so far and I definitely think it was the right choice for me. Thanks!

 

I found some interesting training variations I can do with the ISG, too. The wide grip area is enough for two hands so I can practice two hand crushes (which you usually need a grip machine for) which is great because it feels very specific to double overhand deadlift grip strength (I flip the gripper around each time since it's not completely parallel to even out the slightly different rom). I was thinking of combining this with a loading pin hung from the frame so I could combine the crush with support strength (imagine closing a grip machine and then picking it up, but with this you can vary the crush and support challenge independently) to simulate pulling weight while trying to keep the gripper closed the entire time. 

 

The other cool thing is the more parallel action makes it pretty good for dynamic pinching/thumb training, no thumbscrews needed. I do two thumbs for now, one hand each side and thumbs on the inner handle. Great thumb pad pump!

 

The ISG definitely adds some interesting training options that are difficult with normal grippers or without extra equipment in one compact package. 

 

Climber, do you use grip tape or anything on your ISG? I do notice the finish is pretty slick. 



#4 OFFLINE   climber511

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:10 PM

 

Grippers aren't really that much different than anything else.  A progressive resistance program of your choosing will work just fine.  No program is perfect for everyone.  One person needs reps - another singles.  Most of us do best with some combination of high and low reps plus singles and perhaps negatives down the road.  Really only you are in a position to figure out what works best for you.  Keep a good log of what you do - stay the course if you are making progress - change things up if you are not.

 

PS I feel the ISG is very good for more general strength gains with the more parallel handles - TSGs need to be trained as a skill as much as a strength builder. 

 

Thanks Climber, I actually chose the ISG based on your comment about them in my other post about the general strength and more parallel handles. I really like it so far and I definitely think it was the right choice for me. Thanks!

 

I found some interesting training variations I can do with the ISG, too. The wide grip area is enough for two hands so I can practice two hand crushes (which you usually need a grip machine for) which is great because it feels very specific to double overhand deadlift grip strength (I flip the gripper around each time since it's not completely parallel to even out the slightly different rom). I was thinking of combining this with a loading pin hung from the frame so I could combine the crush with support strength (imagine closing a grip machine and then picking it up, but with this you can vary the crush and support challenge independently) to simulate pulling weight while trying to keep the gripper closed the entire time. 

 

The other cool thing is the more parallel action makes it pretty good for dynamic pinching/thumb training, no thumbscrews needed. I do two thumbs for now, one hand each side and thumbs on the inner handle. Great thumb pad pump!

 

The ISG definitely adds some interesting training options that are difficult with normal grippers or without extra equipment in one compact package. 

 

Climber, do you use grip tape or anything on your ISG? I do notice the finish is pretty slick. 

 

 

I don't use anything on the handles but have seen people use just white adhesive tape - I just dry my hands on a towel and don't seem to have any trouble.  Try some tape and see what you think - easy enough to take it off if you don't like it. 



#5 OFFLINE   John McCarter

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 02:31 PM

The RRBT question, if you can use the ISG with the program, is yes you can. I have the program (not going to mention what is in said program) but never began, because of the amount of volume that is included; not saying I couldn't do it, just way to much for me. Plus, it's only for grippers and maybe a little pinch grip training...so thick bar, work is out of the question. Extensor work would help but that would have to be on certain day with the program.

 

Plus, look at what the name mean. It's not a normal grip program by any means and you will be doing things outside of your comfort level. I don't know how long you have been training grip, but if you're new, the program could overwhelm you, I suggest waiting a year if you're new to grip then give RRBT training a go, but if you've only been at it for a short period of time, it will be too much for you.



#6 OFFLINE   climber511

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 04:04 PM

In my opinion the biggest mistake being made in grip is not building a big enough "base" before starting into the specialty programs.  I guess the same could be said for all areas of training.  If you start with the advanced programs where do you go from there when you plateau? 


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