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Should I Avoid Deadlifting If I Have Anterior Pelvic Tilt?


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#1 OFFLINE   alexjones234

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 10:40 AM

although ive never done deadlifts im aware that they work the glutes and hamstrings, and you need stronger glutes and hamstrings to fix APT..

but every time ive tried deadlifting ive never feel it in my glutes/hams and the next day i can tell that ive strained my back. my ankle flexibility is very poor aswell and i find shoes with a 1" heel really help with getting down to the bar.

i would just like some of your thoughts for a bit of feedback. i really want to get into deadlifting but without the risk of ruining my back.

 

 

 

thanks in advance.



#2 OFFLINE   jchap

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 10:42 AM

although ive never done deadlifts im aware that they work the glutes and hamstrings, and you need stronger glutes and hamstrings to fix APT..

but every time ive tried deadlifting ive never feel it in my glutes/hams and the next day i can tell that ive strained my back. my ankle flexibility is very poor aswell and i find shoes with a 1" heel really help with getting down to the bar.

i would just like some of your thoughts for a bit of feedback. i really want to get into deadlifting but without the risk of ruining my back.

 

 

 

thanks in advance.

Find someone knowledgable to coach you in the deadlift.  You are using incorrect technique if you are straining your back.



#3 OFFLINE   climber511

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 11:14 AM

Funny - I'm reading McGills Low Back Disorders at the moment and he covers this subject.  He calls it "crossed pelvis syndrom" - it is basicly that your glutes are not working correctly and the hamstrings and spinal erectors are doing all the work because of that.  There are several artciles available on this - try a Google search or get McGills book from the library and read it.  There are thing you can do to correct this.  I have the same issue and will be working on it as well. 



#4 OFFLINE   Electron

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 11:16 AM

^Seconded.
Read the section on DLs from Starting Strength. I will send it to you right now if you need it.
Make sure your back is extended properly, and your spine is aligned. Your abs must be fully contracted to protect you from the weight.
Start low, but with wheels at least. 60kilos is good.

Also, I have similar flexibility issues and just bend at the knees more to get down there.
Hit me back.

#5 OFFLINE   hellswindstaff

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 11:48 AM

 

although ive never done deadlifts im aware that they work the glutes and hamstrings, and you need stronger glutes and hamstrings to fix APT..

but every time ive tried deadlifting ive never feel it in my glutes/hams and the next day i can tell that ive strained my back. my ankle flexibility is very poor aswell and i find shoes with a 1" heel really help with getting down to the bar.

i would just like some of your thoughts for a bit of feedback. i really want to get into deadlifting but without the risk of ruining my back.

 

 

 

thanks in advance.

Find someone knowledgable to coach you in the deadlift.  You are using incorrect technique if you are straining your back.

 

1++ Rack Pulls are good too.



#6 OFFLINE   A__G

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 12:24 PM

-Work on hamstring flexibility

-stretch/roll your glutes beforehand

-learn how to extend your hips. A lot of people just bend over from their mid-back when they start deadlifting... not good. I pull roundbacked myself, but it's a choice and the movement is *still* primarily hip extension

 

Also, ankle flexibility shouldn't really be needed in the deadlift. Any chance you could get a video? Your body leverages will greatly impact your ideal form, for one thing, and it's hard to tell exactly what you're doing right/wrong without a vid....



#7 OFFLINE   alexjones234

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 01:21 PM

Funny - I'm reading McGills Low Back Disorders at the moment and he covers this subject.  He calls it "crossed pelvis syndrom" - it is basicly that your glutes are not working correctly and the hamstrings and spinal erectors are doing all the work because of that.  There are several artciles available on this - try a Google search or get McGills book from the library and read it.  There are thing you can do to correct this.  I have the same issue and will be working on it as well. 

 

ye thats right. its basically from sitting down too much and your hip flexors get too tight, and the glutes shut off. from the research ive done it seems that the best things you can do for APT is

 

-Foam roll

-Stretch

-Strengthen glutes and hamstrings.

-Strengthen transverse abdominis (planks and rollouts are the best options.

 

and apparently you shouldnt stretch the hamstrings or do quad dominant exercises while trying to fix APT as it can make it worst.

 

i posted on the bodybuilding website aswell to see what others had to say, and theyve given me some good articles which i think will help.

here they are for anyone whos interested.

 

http://bretcontreras...ack-extensions/

http://bretcontreras...or-pelvic-tilt/

 

it also has these two articles within the articles i listed above.

 

http://www.t-nation....ike_donald_duck

http://bretcontreras...d-glute-bridge/

 

 

that pretty much covers everything were gonna need to know. im gonna go and watch some tv then come back and read all four of those links. their not too lengthy which helps.



#8 OFFLINE   jchap

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 01:49 PM

So you are going to do the glute bridge to get better at deadlifts?



#9 OFFLINE   wojo

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 12:28 PM

I wouldn't overthink it too much....you know what they say about paralysis through analysis....just make sure you're using proper technique and have at it. 

 

I second the notion that you post a video so we can see what you may or may not be doing form-wise.


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#10 OFFLINE   Stephen Ruby

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 07:25 PM

Have you tried working rack pulls below the knee? That could help you work on using the glutes but having a much better starting position. Then once you are comfortable with that you can try working from the floor. I have really awful leverages for the deadlift-long longs, short arms- so I struggled to get a good position and I worked rack pulls a lot to get the motion down better. I actually find them to be harder since I can't build momentum from the floor as easy.

 

 


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#11 OFFLINE   Mike Sharkey

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 11:12 PM

personally, i would investigate lots of different types of deadlifts, and even modifications that may make your movement feel more comfortable.  imo, people get too into the idea of looking for the 'right' form, and instead should be asking the question, "what can I do". i.e. how can I make the exercise meet my body, rather than forcing the body to do something it doesn't really want to do.

 

just as an example of things you can test out, there are jefferson deadlifts, one handed deadlifts (for instance on a loading pin with a ring), suitcase deadlifts, all sorts of different stances you can use with a bar.  one hand on a bar.  bear hug deadlift a heavy sandbag.  limited range deadlifts with eagle loops around a bar.  or one handed on a loading pin. someone already mentioned rack pulls.  partial ranges of motion are excellent to train, despite conventional rejection of them among strength enthusiasts.   kettlebell swings or better yet cleans (especially with two bells- do 50 cleans with the 32kg and you will see what i mean) are an excellent way to condition this movement.  the axle.  everybody here knows the axle!  anyway.  lots of options.  just my 2 cents.  


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#12 OFFLINE   A__G

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 02:28 AM

personally, i would investigate lots of different types of deadlifts, and even modifications that may make your movement feel more comfortable.  imo, people get too into the idea of looking for the 'right' form, and instead should be asking the question, "what can I do". i.e. how can I make the exercise meet my body, rather than forcing the body to do something it doesn't really want to do.

 

just as an example of things you can test out, there are jefferson deadlifts, one handed deadlifts (for instance on a loading pin with a ring), suitcase deadlifts, all sorts of different stances you can use with a bar.  one hand on a bar.  bear hug deadlift a heavy sandbag.  limited range deadlifts with eagle loops around a bar.  or one handed on a loading pin. someone already mentioned rack pulls.  partial ranges of motion are excellent to train, despite conventional rejection of them among strength enthusiasts.   kettlebell swings or better yet cleans (especially with two bells- do 50 cleans with the 32kg and you will see what i mean) are an excellent way to condition this movement.  the axle.  everybody here knows the axle!  anyway.  lots of options.  just my 2 cents.  

 

Great post. One of the best things about deadlifts is that most of the variants are pretty useful, I keep finding new ones that are actually really good. Just earlier this week I discovered that I'm pretty naturally suited for jefferson lifts: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=8_YeJhWEgYA

 

And if you don't plan on competing in the deadlift, the variant that you can do progressively and pain-free, and enjoy the most, is the best choice. However, if OP has ankle flexibility issues in the deadlift (?!), can't feel his glutes and hams, and feels like he's strained his back every time... well... some extra flexibility is probably needed before trying most if not all deadlift variants from the floor. Rack pulls from just below the knees, or as low as he can go, might be good to start out with. I'd still like to see a video, sounds like a lack of midsection tightness and/or hip drive, idk. 



#13 OFFLINE   ScottW

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 11:42 PM

Normally a good way to correct an anterior tilt is to stretch the tight anterior anterior muscles (rectus femoris/quads, to a lesser extent other hip flexors) and strengthen the posterior muscles (hamstrings). It's hard to diagnose over the internet but if you are in an anterior tilt you probably don't need to stretch the hamstrings right now because they're already in a lengthened position.

 

I've personally found some muscle energy techniques (much less mystical than it sounds) to work very well for pulling my pelvis back into alignment. That could be something worth looking into.

 

Finally if you're looking for some glute/hamstring exercises that don't fry your back, arch-back good mornings and glute ham raises are always a good choice if you do them properly.



#14 OFFLINE   Scott Styles

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 08:44 AM

Put all this energy you're spending on analysis into finding experienced lifters to learn from, in person.